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TEN CENTS 





VARIETY 



50,000 Votes for Sarah Bernhardt 

And 50,000 more clamored for the same privilege in New York last week 

Votes of appreciation from an audience that marvelled at the achievement of the divine Sarah 

WHO SHALL IT BE? 



IT 

YOU OR YOUR COMPETITOR? 

That will be progressive enough to give your patrons the opportunity they are craving for to see the divin* 



' 



The Most Perfect Photo Play Ever Produced 



Queen 



IN 4 PARTS 









abeth" 

LICENSED BY THE MOTION PICTURE PATENTS CO. 





FOR OPEN TIME WRITE TO THE FOLLO WING OFFICES IN YOUR TERRITORY: 



NEW YORK 

PEOPLES VAUDEVILLE CO., AMERICAN THEATRE BLDG., N. Y. CITY 

CALIFORNIA 

FAMOUS PLAYERS FUJI CO. OF CALIFORNIA, PHELAN BLDG.. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

NEW ENGLAND 
FAMOUS FLAYERS FILM CO. OF NEW ENGLAND. 597 WASHINGTON ST., 

BOSTON, MASS. 

SOUTHERN STATES 

(ALABAMA, LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI. FLORIDA, GEORGIA* TENNESSEE 

JET, 



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FAMOUS PLAYERS FILM CO., Se» MORTON BLDG., CHICAGO. VUL. 

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KENTUCKY, NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, AND 

WEST VIRGINIA) write to 

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BLDG.. ATLANTA, GA. 

FOR ALL OTHER INFORMATION AND BOOKINGS IK STATES NOT LISTED, WRITE OR WIRE MAIN OFFICE 



KANSAS CITY FEATURE FILM CO., 81S WALNUT ST., KANSAS CITY, MO. 



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CULLEN 






wish to announce that they are now under the personal direction of 



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WHO PLACED THEM FOR 






40 WEEKS ON THE LOEW CIRCUIT 



■J wnfMWMa MM fly BM B MMI TAJUWTT 







Vol. XXVIII. No. 5. 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1912. 



PRICE 10 CENTS. 






LONG ISLAND "WHITE CITY" 

SCHEM E OP IR ME KIRALFY 

Earl's Court, London, Promoter, Interesting Pennsylvan- 
ia Railroad in the Project. Estimated 10,000,000 
Visitors Will Be Drawn to Proposed 
Resort at Jamaica 



If suitable financial arrangements 
can be made, New York City will have 
in one of its suburbs a huge "White 
City," under the direction of Imre 
Kiralfy, originally of the Kiralfy 
Brothers of "Black Crook" and Niblo's 
Garden fame and of later years achiev- 
, ing fortune conducting Earls' Court, 
London. 

While in America recently, Imre se- 
cured an aption on one hundred or 
more acres running down to the water- 
front at Jamaica Bay, Long Island. He 
endeavored to interest the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad officials (who control 
the Long Island) into financing the 
scheme. It will require $5,000,000 to 
put the Kiralfy ideas into execution. 
The figures put before the railroad 
magnates placed the estimated num- 
ber of visitors to be carried over the 
Long Island Railroad to the proposed 
amusement park at ten million annu- 
ally. The railroad company is now 
erecting a new $3,000,000 terminal de- 
pot at Jamaica. 

Imre Kiralfy's son, Albert, who whs 
here with his father to promote the 
scheme, has returned to England, leav- 
ing Mr. Craft at work endeavoring to 
close up the negotiations opened with 
the Penn. railway people. 

Plans for the proposed park were 
drawn by another son of Imre, which 
call for structures built on lines similar 
to the St. Louis Fair edifices, with a 
magnificent Court of Honor, and the 
general lighting scheme to be fash- 
ioned after the last Buffalo Fair. 



OAMERON-McCRACKEN. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 2. 
The unofficial report has been pub- 
lished here that Grace Cameron and 
Sam McCracken, former general man- 
ager of the Barnum-Bailey Circus, will 
become husband and wife, if they are 



successful in freeing themselves from 
their present marriage bonds. 

Proceedings are pending in San 
Francisco by which Miss Cameron 
seeks ^o divorce H. W. Kenworthy, 
while the present Mrs. McCracken is 
an applicant in the Indiana Courts for 
a similar decree! 

Miss Cameron did not deny these 
rumors when called upon by a Variety 
representative. 



NAT WILLS* SECRET. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

Nat Wills is confiding to his friends 
these days that the stork is hovering 
over his home on Long Island. 

Mrs. Wills is better known to the 
profession and the public as La Tit- 
comb. 



CHICAGO CRITIC BARRED. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 
Eric Delamatcr, dramatic editor of 
the Inter-Ocean, is not making the 
rounds of the Shubert houses. He is 
persona non grata since his recent 
criticism of "The Whirl of Society." 



BIG BILL AT FRISCO. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

The program at the Orpheum next 
week will be an expensive one, prob- 
ably costing around $5,000, although it 
is not the biggest show in salary the 
Orpheum has given. 

Ethel Barrymore will headline it, 
with Owen McGiveney also on the pro- 
gram. 

Sioux City, Oct. 2. 
The biggest and most expensive vau- 
deville show yet offered at the Or- 
pheum will be on view next week, when 
David Belasco's "Drums of Oude" is 
to headline the program. 



FIELDS STARRING RUSSELL? 

Rumor had it Wednesday that Lew 
Fields would shortly place in rehearsal 
a new comedy, without music, in which 
Lillian Russell was to be starred. No 
verification of the- report was to be 
had. 

Mr. Fields was out of town and no 
one in his office knew anything of such 
a plan. Miss Russell, who is still 
honeymooning at Ventnor, N. J., with 
her new husband, Alexander P. Moore, 
was also inaccessible. 



WOODRUFF IN FAIRBANKS ACT? 

The piece that will bring Harry 
Woodruff to vaudeville is said to be 
the sketch employed by Douglas Fair- 
banks while in the twice-daily for a 
short while. 

The Fairbanks comedy playlet was 
"A Regular Business Man," by John 
Stokes. 



FROHMAN ACT DISBANDED. 

Daniel Frohman's company appear- 
ing at the Union Square two weeks 
ago in "The Diamond Necklace/' has 
been disbanded. 



u* 



FRITZTS ANGER FLAStt. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. 

'The Love Wager" with Fritzi Scheff, 
will leave the Chestnut Street Opera 
House this week, also the memory of 
Miss Scheffs remark on the opening 
night, when in response to continuous 
applause for an encore, the prima 
donna, with something approaching 
contempt in her look, said, as she 
glanced at the audience, "All paper out 
there." The noise in front immediately 
ceased. It did not make itself again 
heard during the performance. 

There was some paper given out for 
the premiere of the Jos. M. Gaites show, 
but how the artistic Fritzi could so 
quickly connect with the box office 
hasn't been answered by any of the 
retired theatrical folk who reside in this 
town. 

Miss Scheff made it very apparent she 
was of the regular three-star brand 
upon entering the Opera House. Of 
the trio of dressing rooms on the stage 
(two on one side and another on the 
other) Fritzi simply remarked she 
wanted only all of them — and she got 
'em. 



HAMMERSTEIN SALE BLOCKED. 

Any sale of the Victoria theatre by 
Oscar Hammerstein has been blocked, 
it is said, until such time as Mr. Ham- 
merstein may clear off a lien of $182,- 
000, alleged by the attorney for the 
Hammerstein children, to exist in the 
form of an annuity settlement to the 
late Mrs. Oscar Hammerstein. 

The bidders for the Victoria were 
notified by mail late last week of the 
existing condition, the lawyers advis- 
ing that the purchase of the property 
would be made at the buyer's peril 
unless the stock of the Hammerstein 
Amusement Co., held in escrow to se- 
cure the total (payable at $200 weekly), 
should be formally released. Mrs. 
Hammerstein is said to have disposed 
of her annuity by will, making her 
daughter, Stella, the principal benefi- , 
ciary. 

Managers of the United Booking 
Offices, Martin Beck and the Shuberts, 
received the letters of warning. Ne- 
gotiations were reported to have been 
abruptly broken off upon the receipt 
by the intending purchasers. The high- 
est bid made up to that time had been 

{50,000, Mr. Hammerstein asking • 
),000, with $200,000 of it in cash. 

A controversy in the papers, started 
by William Hammerstein, finally re- 
sulted in Oscar Hammerstein issuing a 
statement. His son, William, alleged 
unjust treatment at the hands of his 
father, whose statement read in part 
as follows: 

"During the last few days I have 
been made a target by various people 
in relation to my rights to dispose of 
my Victoria theatre and also as to the 
financial results of my directorate of 
grand opera during the last five years. 

"The references made to the finan- 
cial results of my conduct of grand 
opera forces me (and for the first time 
in my artistic as well as business ca- 
reer) to give out the following state- 
ment: * * * 

"The published business affairs of 
the Victoria are grossly exaggerated. 
The competition of the multitude of 
theatres, the ever-increasing taxes, and 
the enormous cost of the performances 
leave but medium profits." 



DOC O'NEIL. next to closing-. 
Shubert. Vtlcm. thin w«^k— A bit 

( A<lvfrtl«««Miiont.) 



VARIETY 



KEITH ORDERS BIGGER SHOWS 
FOR HIS N EW YOR K THEATRES 

Alarmed Over Depressing Patronage at Percy G. Williams 9 

Former Houses, Instructions are Given to 

Iri crease Quality and Cost of Bills. 

Commence with Colonial. 



The few remaining "regulars" among 
the audience at the B. F. Keith New 
York vaudeville theatres will shortly 
see a better brand of programs than 
have been on view in the former houses 
of Percy G. Williams since the season 
opened. 

Last Friday instructions were given 
out in the United Booking Offices to 
improve the quality of the bills in the 
Keith New York theatres. A start was 
made at the Colonial. The weekly sal- 
ary limit, rumored to have been set at 
$4,000 for the week at that house, was 
raised to $5,000, it is said. 

Immediately calls were sent out to 
the vaudeville agents to submit at once 
their biggest available material. The 
Colonial shows for the future, as far as 
filled in on the routing sheets, were 
propped up with more costly acts, it is 
said. 

The depressing business at the Keith 
houses (excepting Orpheum, Brooklyn) 
is said to have been the cause of the 
better-show order going out. Follow- 
ing the warm spell of a few weeks ago, 
the patronage at the several local 
Keith's did not improve. The policy 
of a cheap program, much below the 
total price Mr. Williams paid, had to 
be abandoned. 

When Cecilia Loftus opens her re- 
turn American engagement at the Col- 
onial, Oct. 21, her stay there will be 
termed "Society Week." An extra ef- 
fort will be put forth by the 1 manage- 
ment to draw a classy list of patrons 
for the engagement. It is said Melville 
Ellis has been approached to take part 
on the "Elite Bill." 

Since the time Percy G. Williams 
opened the Colonial, on Broadway, no 
one can recall any week when the 
night admission to the orchestra was 
fifty cents. With the B. F. Keith; 
reign there, a scale of 50-75-$l in the 
orchestra section has been made. 



MAX LINDER COMING OVER. 

Paris, Oct. 2. 

The very well advertised Pathe mov- 
ing picture actor. Max Linder, will go 
to America with Mile. Napierkowska. 
They are now appearing «t Barcelona 
in the sketch that is to open with them 
at the Palace, Chicago, January 27 next. 

C. M. Ercole, representing the Braff 
Agency, which placed the act with Mar- 
tin Beck, will accompany Napierkowska 
to the other side as her personal repre- 
sentative. 



BARD WILL LOCALIZE. 

London, Oct. 2. 
Two weeks in New York before open- 
ing in vaudeville will be spent by Wil- 
kie Bard in localizing or adapting his 
material to the American taste. 

There is said to be some difficulty 
over completing final details of the Wil- 
kie Bard contracts with the United 



Booking Offices through Bard objecting 
to appearing on Sundays while over 
here. It is expected to be adjusted, al- 
though Bard is reported as having 
taken a stand in London against Sun- 
day shows in the present agitation over 
there on that subject. 



MAY BECOME MONEY MAKER. 

Berlin, Oct. 2. 
At the Komedienshaus is "De Zarin," 
by Michel Lengyet (author of "Tai- 
fun") and Ludwig Biro. Its literary 
merit is little, but there is a possibility 
of the play being built into a money 
maker. 



BETTER OUTSIDE BERLIN. 

Berlin, Oct. 2. 
Birinski's tragic-comedie, "Narren- 
tanz," aiming to ridicule Russian offi- 
cials, only partly successful at thei 
Lessing theatre, but reported as go- 
ing well in other cities. 



"HELENA RITCHIE" DISCUSSED. 

London, Oct. 2. 

Olga Nethersole produced "The 
Awakening of Helena Ritchie" in Bir- 
mingham (played in America by Mar- 
garet Anglin). 

The subject is creating a lot of dis- 
cussion here. 



IRVING PUTTING ON ••TYPHOON." 

London, Oct. 2. 
Laurence Irving will produce "The 
Typhoon" at Newcastle, Oct. 3. 



"JOHN GANTON*S'* NEW ACT. 

London, Oct. 2. 
A new last act has been written for 
"The Great John Ganton," as a con- 
cession to the London public 



PATSY DOYLE DOES WELL. 

London, Oct. 2. 
Patsy Doyle opened at the Hippo- 
drome Monday in next to closing posi- 
tion. Despite a bad spot, he did well. 



"LITTLE CAFE" IN LONDON. 

London, Oct. 2 
"The Little Cafe" at the Playhouse, 
with Cyril Maude as the waiter, makes 
a good performance. The piece is 
lather extravagant. 



TURNING POINT MELODRAMATIC. 

London, Oct. 2. 

"The Turning Point" at St. James's 

has a slow first act, with melodramatic 

second and third acts. Alexander and 

Ethel Irving scored personal successes. 



"UNCLE SAM** TOO LENGTHY. 

London, Oct. 2. 
"Uncle Sam," a three-act farce by 
Herbert Shelley, produced at the 
King's, Hammersmith, is a success, but 
would probably be better condensed 
to one act. 



LAUDER'S NEW NUMBERS. 

London, Oct. 2. 

Harry Lauder is going big at the 
Tivoii with two new numbers, "She's 
the Lass for Me" and "The Bonny 
Lassies Love the Kilty Lads." * 

Lauder has duodinal ulcer and is 
consulting Dr. Herschell today. He 
had been off the stage several weeks 
suffering great pain, though playing, 
the Tivoii at present 



KILLED BY GENTLEMAN FRIEND| 

London, Oct. 2. 

Florence Dudley, an ex-pantomime 
principal boy, was shot dead in a 
taxicah by a non-professional "gentle- 
man friend.** 

Several letters were found from oth- 
er men making appointments and a 
telegram proposing marriage. 

Miss Dudley had just received con- 
tracts for three tours of the Syndi- 
cate halls through the Harry Burns 
agency. 



"QUAKER GIRL** IN FRENCH. 

Paris, Oct. 2. 

A French version of "The Quaker 
Girl," by P. Ferrier and C. Quinel, al- 
ready played in the provinces, was 
produced at the Olympia, Oct. 1, and 
went very nicely. 

It has been well mounted by Dod- 
son, stage manager of the London 
Adelphi, who came to Paris for that 
purpose. 

The dances were arranged by W. C. 
Jackson, who has a good troupe of 
girls. 

The leading roles are held by Alice 
O'Brien, Lawler, Rosny Derys, Messrs. 
H. Leoni, who has a fine voice, Dor- 
ville, Harry Mass, and Albers. 

Mass as Tony is very good and 
Dorville as Jeremiah, amusing, but a 
trifle coarse. 

It is only intended to run this show 
until the season's revue by Rip and 
Bousquet is ready in November. 



CHAIRMAN AT FOLIES BERGERE. 

Paris, Oct 2. 
During this month at the Folies 
Bergere, the old English system of run- 
ning a variety show has been installed. 
Manager Bannel has empowered Jules 
Moy as the "chairman." He will sit in 
the orchestra, announcing each number, 
with comment. 



THEATRICAL FOOTBALL PLAYERS 

Paris, Oct. 2. 
During this week a football game will 
be played by the Olympia eleven against 
the Folies Bergere team. The Olym- 
pians are mainly Americans. 



WINTERGARTEN*S OCT. BILL. 

Berlin, Oct. 2. 
In the Wintergr.rten program for Oc 
tcber, Yvette is a good success, wi'ii 
part of the audience understanding t'ns 
kind of act. It is objected to lyr others. 
Mado Minty in dancing scenes from 
"Sappho" and "Harlequin," supported 
by the "Sunshine Girls," well liked. 
Louis Hardt in an athletic production 
received great applause; Collins and; 
Hart and Three Rubes, going well; 
Carlton, getting over; Maria Bordin 
and partner going big. Other numbers 
are James Teddy, Carlyle Kawbaw- ; 
gam, Grassi Bros., Merveille Co. 



OFFENBACH'S "ORPHEUS** GOOD. 

Berlin, Oct. 2. 
At the Theatre Nollendorf, Platz 
Charles, the production of Offenbach's 
"Orpheus in Unterwelt," successful, 
with good staging. 



FRENCH SOUBRET DOESN'T FIT. 

London, Oct. 2. 
Yvonne De Fleuriel, a French sou- 
bret, opening at the Hippodrome Mon- 
day, proved unfitted to the clientele 
of that hall. 



MARIGNY CLOSED. 

Paris, Oct. 2. 
The Folies Marigny closed Sept. 28. 



YORK'S TRIPLE BILL. 

London, Oct. 2. 

"Overruled," by Bernard Shaw; 
"Rosalind," by J. M. Barrie, and "The 
Widow "of Wasdale," by Arthur Wing 
Pinero, will form the triple bill at the 
Duke of York's two weeks hence. 

J. M. Barrie, on finding that a play in 
the triple bill had a similar scenic 
effect to one in his, has substituted an- 
other playlet. 



FEMALE STARS* SAILING DATES. 

Paris, Oct. 2. 
Bernhardt sails for New York Nov. 
23; Bordoni, Oct. 5; Gaby Deslys, Oct. 
12. 



NOT SAME DICK TEMPLE. 

Dick Temple, former husband of 
Evie Greene, now with John Cort's 
"Rose of Panama" company playing 
in the west, is not the Richard Temple 
for whom a fund is being raised in 
London, as reported last week. 

"Dick" is in receipt of a good sal- 
ary and is now happily married to 
Kathryn Miley. 



EDWARDES* NEW SHOW OCT. 12. 

London, Oct. 2. 
George Edwardes' "The Dancing 
Mistress" will be produced at the 
Adelphi, Oct. 12. 



"INFERIOR SEX" ANNOUNCED. 

London, Oct. 2. 
"The Inferior Sex" is scheduled for 
the Criterion to follow "A Youhr 
Man's Fancy." 



"EVERYWOMAN" FALLING OFF. 

London, Oct 2. 
There are already signs of the busi- 
ness of "Everywoman" falling off, the 
indications being that the piece wilt 
barely run to Christmas. 



FOSTER BREAKS HIS LEG. 

London, Oct. 2. 
George Foster fell, near the Hippo- 
drome, a few days ago and broke his 
Icr in two places. 



HOUGHTON PRODUCING HERE. 

London, Oct. 2. 
Stanley Houghton will visit America 
to produce "HinOle Wakes" and 
"Fancy Free." 



WELCH TAKES "SEVEN DAYS." 

London, Oct. 2. 
The English rights to "Seven Days" 
have been secured by James Welch. 



VARIETY 



ABOLISH STAGE HANDS' TIPS 
INTENT OF BURDEN ED ARTISTS 

Say Union's Enforcement of Ruling That Extra Stage 

Hand Must be Carried Cuts Down Profits and Makes 

Tipping Extra Hardship. I. A. T. S. E. President 

Shay Pleased to Hear it. 



Vaudeville artists made to carry a 
stage hand through having two or 
more drops in their act, are talking of 
abolishing tips to stage crews of the 
theatres played in. 

The movement has been started by 
Gardner Crane, after conferring with 
other artists, who claim to be burden- 
ed unnecessarily with an expense of 
around $50 weekly through the en- 
forcement of the I. A. T. S. E. (stage 
hands union) regulation. 

The additional and unexpected 
charge to an act is materially reduc- 
ing the profit, say the artists, until 
they find themselves unable to tip the 
theatre's stage crew at the end of the 
week, as has been the custom. 

An estimate of the probable number 
of acts that will be affected by the 
ruling gives around fifty per cent, of 
all turns playing as near the correct 
percentage. 

The non-tipping plan is expected by 
the artists to bring the subject of the 
extra stage hand to the attention of 
the various locals, through members 
who may feel the loss of the fees they 
have grown to look for. Through 
this it is hoped by the artists the next 
annual convention of the stage hands 
unions will near about it. 

A committee of artists may be an- 
nounced within a week. Acts having 
the extra stage hand thrust upon them 
will be invited to write the commit- 
tee and enroll themselves among the 
non-tippers, while the regulation re- 
mains in force. 

The Alliance intends to continue its 
enforcement of the ruling that an ex- 
tra man be carried by vaudeville acts 
carrying enough scenery and sets to 
come under its ban. 

President Charles C. Shay, of the 
Alliance, says it is up to the local 
branches throughout the country to 
enforce the ruling. Any negligence 
on their part will result in drastic ac- 
tion by the Alliance. 

Regarding the proposed abolition of 
tipping by acts compelled to pay for 
the extra stage hand service, President 
Shay told a Variety! representative 
he was bitterly opposed to stage tip- 
ping and would like nothing better 
than to see the evil abolished alto- 
gether. He says that tipping places 
the men in the same category as that 
of a lackey and works an injustice on 
small acts unable to afford tips. 

President Shay says that for the 
past two years the New York union 
(No. 1) had a section in its by-laws 
prohibiting its members from accept- 
ing any kind of tips. According to 
this ruling a member is first liable to 
a fine, then suspension and later ex- 
pulsion. 

While it is a known fact, that acts, 
especially the big time artists, have 
for a long time been pretty generous 
with their tips in the New York 



houses, so far no union stage employe 
has been yanked onto the carpet for 
violation of the union's by-laws. 

It is contended by Alliance members 
that acts in carrying the required 
union help will get the same service 
and attention that the legitimate shows 
are rendered and that their produc- 
tions will be handled just as perfectly 
without any tips forthcoming. 



JOHNSON AND DEAN APART. 

Johnson and Dean, a well-known 
colored, act for several years, have 
separated. Dora Dean will play in an 
act with four men. Mr. Johnson an- 
nounces his intention of going South 
to operate theatres. 



GAME OVER FOR HIS MONEY. 

The length of Jock McKay's visit 
to America this time is to be but three 
weeks, says Mr. McKay, who added 
he only came over to draw out his 
money from the Greenwich Bank. He 
holds music hall contracts in England 
for the next two years. 

Mr. McKay, who is a Scotch com- 
edian, is at the Fifth Avenue this 
week, and has been held over for next 
week. 



PAYTON'S CABARET DEFINITION. 

Corse Payton says a Cabaret is a 
place of small oysters and, big lemons. 



BERNARD & WESTON AGAIN. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

Mike Bernard and Willie Weston will 
resume partnership again for vaudeville 
engagements immediately after Wes- 
ton closes with "The Whirl of Society." 

Bernard is filling an engagement at 
Rector's, topping the features engaged 
for the Cabaret performance. 

"The Social Whirl" opened at Kan- 
sas City Sunday night, with Al Jolson 
returned to the cast. Jolson was out 
of the Chicago engagement for a few 
performances through a cold. 



ALBEE REPORTED RICK. 

The absence of E. F. Albee from New 
York has lengthened from one week to 
three. He is not expected to return un- 
til Oct. 12. 

At the United Booking Offices it is 
given out the general manager is at 
Hut Springs, Va., having gone there 
to rest. 

J. J. Murdock, Albcc's assistant, 
away for a week or so, returned to 
the Putnam Building Monday. 



"GIRL FROM CHILD'S" SKETCH. 

Archie Colby will respond to the 
call of "author" when Inez McCauley 
presents a new sketch, entitled "The 
Girl from Childs.'" 

The leading role is that of a serio- 
comic waitress who finds herself a 
servant in the home of her ex-husbai:J. 



BRAY AT HIS DESK. 

The former desk of Charles E. Bray 
in the Orpheum Circuit Offices near- 
ly bowed as Mr. Bray sat himself uo 
on it Monday morning. 

From that moment onward, Charles 
E. Bray was re-established in the 
position he had occupied for many, 
years in the Orpheum service, before 
having been detailed by Martin Beck 
to assume the general direction of the 
Western Vaudeville Manager; Asso- 
ciation, Chicago. 

An offer received by Mr. Bray to 
take charge of the concessions at the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition in San 
Francisco (1915) was not accepted. 



AL VON TILZER SELLS. 

The York Music Co. is now controlled 
by Jack and Jules Von Tilzer, who 
bought out their brother, Al, in the con- 
cern last week. 

Jack will remain at the New York 
headquarters. Jules left for Chicago 
Sunday to look after the western in- 
terests of the firm. Harry Rogers is 
still in charge of the professional de- 
partment for the York Co. 



BIO ACTS BREAK EVEN. 

There was an even break among the 
big vaudeville acts shown in New York 
this week, for the first time. 

At the Colonial Mrs. Langtry with 
an English company and sketch, is 
voted a failure, though drawing fairlv 
well early in the week. Th;* J»rsey 
Lily came back to America for $2,500 
weekly, and has been engaged for 
twelve weeks in. vaudeville over here 
at that figure. A great quantity ot 
'publicity was secured for her just prior 
to the New York opening. 

At the Orpheum, Brooklyn, L ul i 
Glaser, in her variety debut, is success- 
ful in a musical comedy skit. Miss 
Glaser receives $1,750 weekly, while 
playing in the B. F. Keith New York 
houses. 




LOEW AFTER DELMAR? 

The "small time" is beckoning to 
Jule Delmar, from a story about which 
says that Jos. M. Schenck, general 
booker for the Loew Circuit, would 
like to have Mr. Delmar in his de- 
partment. 

It was reported the Loew Circuit 
wanted the ex-United Booking Offices 
man to take charge of the New Eng- 
land department that will be reestab- 
lished. Another report was that with 
the influx of big time acts to the small 
agency, a position would be created* 
for Mr. Delmar there. 

Delmar and Jos. Shea opened an 
agency this week in the Shubert build- 
ing. Delmar is subject to the direc- 
tion of the Shuberts, owing to a con- 
tract he holds with them. Whatever 
overtures have been made for Delmar's 
services by the Loew people, havef 
been tendered to the Shuberts, it is 
said. 



RALPH POST DETAINED. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

Ralph Post, musical comedy actor, 
heir to a $30,000 estate here, who came 
on from New York six weeks ago 
with his wife (Nellie Clinton), is de- 
tained at the Detention Hospital, 
pending an examination as to his san- 
ity. 

Post got into the toils through a 
threatening letter which he is claimed 
to have written an attorney. Post is 
very well known in burlesque and 
vaudeville. 



J. MATTHEWS* MOTHER-IN-LAW. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 2. 
Jack Matthews and his wife (Nadje) 
at Pantages' week before last are re- 
ported to have separated, with Mat- 
thews declaring it a case of too mucn 
mother-in-law. He will probably re- 
main on the coast for a while and do 
some vaudeville producing. At pres- 
ent Matthews is rehearsing a "school 
kid" act, featuring Eddie Harris, late 
singing comedian at the Adolphus. 



MIDWAY OWNER ROBBED. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 
George W. Kelly, owner of the Mid- 
way, the best known of the Barbary 
Coast music halls, was held up at his 
home at an early hour yesterday and 
robbed of $4,000. No arrests havet 
been made. 



POKER MONEY. 

Apple orchards were invested in Sun- 
day at Cumberland, Md., by Dan Hen- 
nessy, James E. Plunkett and Maurice 
Rose. 

Dan got in for ten acres, Jimmy 
plunged for twenty, and "Rosey" piked 
for an acreage of ten, he having let 
Lew Golder in on his buy for a split. 



ETHEL WHITESIDE 

and Pick* 
In Vaudeville 



LEFT NEARLY A MILLION. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 2. 

Through the death of Mrs. Arcadia 
Bandini Dc Barker, Judge J. J. Car- 
rillo will inherit around $800,000. The 
estate of the deceased is estimated at 
$20,000,000. She was one of the pi- 
oneer settlers and owns about all of 
Santa Monica. 

Judge Carrillo was her nephew He 
is 70 years old. His son, Leo Car- 
rillo, is playing in eastr-rn vaudes ille. 



VARIETY 



BOOKED ON DRESS REHEARSAL: 
CANCELED AFTER APPEARING 

Louise Dresser Instructs Attorney to Bring Damage Suit 

Against B. P. Keith Company for $5,000. How They 

Fooled Her. One Actor Has Nervous Prostration, 

Alleged to Have Been About Through Trying 

to Do Business With Agency. 



Louise Dresser and company, play- 
ing the Colonial last week, were billed 
for the Alhambra this week and ex- 
pected five weeks of vaudeville en- 
gagements following the Colonial. 

Mist Dresser gave a full dress re- 
hearsal of the act, but alleges she was 
not then quite ready to open. Despite 
this, owing to the postponement of the 
Lulu Glaser engagement at the Colo- 
nial for last week, Miss Dresser says 
she was told to open there. Believing 
that for the six weeks she was to re- 
ceive a salary of $1,000 weekly, 
through a verbal understanding, when 
the contract arrived for the Colonial 
calling for $750 Miss Dresser did not 
sign it, but accepted that amount Sun- 
day evening. 

Meantime the singer was informed 
that the Alhambra and the remaining 
weeks were off, but evidently acting 
on advice of counsel, Miss Dresser 
sent her trunks, etc., to the Alhambra, 
where they were refused. Later, on 
Monday morning, she reported for re- 
hearsal and was informed by the stage 
doorkeeper he could not admit her. 

Franklin Bien, attorney, admitted 
Tuesday he had been consulted by 
Miss Dresser, but said no papers had 
been served on the Keith people. He 
refused to talk until they had, which 
he expected would be in a few days. 

Miss Dresser will appear under the 
management of H. H. Frazee in Jan- 
uary. 

The dress rehearsal was given by 
Miss Dresser at the Elliott theatre. 
Several of the men who select acts 
for the United Booking Offices attend- 
ed it, and waxed quite enthusiastic. 
Edward Darling, in charge of the bills 
at the larger Keith New York houses, 
was one of them. 

The amount the damage suit will 
ask for will be $5,000. Several in- 
stances of acts being juggled about by 
the United are daily talked of. There 
is in New York at present an actor 
who has been ill for eight weeks with 
nervous prostration, his collapse being 
attributed to the worries and annoy- 
ances suffered by him in attempting to 
transact business at the U. B. O. 



MORRISEY LEAVES FOR HOME. 

Sunday saw the departure from New 
York of John Morrisey, formerly man- 
ager of the Orpheum, San Francisco. 
Before leaving Mr. Morrisey said he 
expected to have his own vaudeville 
theatre on the Coast in the near future. 



'ETERNAL WALTZ" OPENS. 

Buffalo, Oct. 2. 

The Martin Beck-Jos. Hart's produc- 
tion of "The Eternal Waltz," an im- 
portation from London, was first shown 
Monday, at Shea's. 

A large number of people are in the 
company, which is a very large one 



for vaudeville. It takes about $3,250 
in salary weekly to operate it, it is said. 

The act is headed westward, and will 
play the Orpheum Circuit houses be- 
fore returning east. 

After the opening performance 
Monday, when the production was en- 
thusiastically received, Manager M. 
Shea wanted to hold over the act. 



YOSCARRY8 DIDN'T SIGN. 

Following the trouble the Yoscarrys 
found. themselves in last week with the 
United Booking Offices through having 
appeared the previous Sunday night at 
the Shuberts' Winter Garden, and the 
proposition from the Shuberts that fol- 
lowed, which included a contract to ap- 
pear with "The Social Whirl" in their 
act, the acrobats refused to sign the 
agreement, owing to it calling for a 
salary $25 less than had been asked. 



WALTER KEEFE HERB. 

The C. H. Miles bookings in the 
Consolidated Booking Offices will be 
looked after by Walter Keefe, who 
reached New York Tuesday. Mr. Keefe 
organized the Theatre Booking Cor- 
poration in Chicago. It handles middle 
western vaudeville houses including the 
Miles Circuit. 

Wednesday all the circuits booking 
through the Consolidated had their 
books and booking men in the same 
room for convenience. 

Mr. Keefe said Tuesday he expected 
to divide his time between New York 
and Chicago, still retaining the per- 
sonal general direction of the T. B. C. 
in Chicago. 



SMALL TIME PROFITABLE. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 
The House of David Band, with twen- 
ty-five pieces, booked by Lee Kraus 
over the Interstate time will receive 
$800 weekly which amount includes 
transportation in a private car. 

Comparing salaries on the split-week 
time, the booking of Thomas Jefferson 
and Co., in "Rip Van Winkle" at $750 
weekly gives one the impression small 
time is profitable. This is the amount 
Jefferson will receive at the Wilson 
and Williard where he plays a week in 
each house. 



3-A-DAY IN HOT SPRINGS. 

Hot Springs, Ark., Oct. 2. 

The New Lyric, built on the site of 
the old Lyric, is announced as ready 
for opening Oct 7 with vaudeville play- 
ing three shows a day. It will be 
operated under the management of 
Hall & Jacobs. C. E. Hodkins will 
handle the booking end. 

After a summer of pictures tjie Prin- 
cess here has gone back to the split 
week vaudeville policy, booked by 
the Interstate Circuit. 



PROCTOR'S 50 OT. VAUDEVILLE. 

Newark, Oct. 2. 

When the vaudeville theatre F. F. 
Proctor will shortly start to build 
opens here, Newark will be able to see 
the biggest vaudeville shows for fifty 
cents. That is to be the top orchestra 
seat admission price. The new Proc- 
tor's will seat about 2,800. It can 
not- open before next season. 

The present Proctor house (big 
time) did not start the season to sat- 
isfy its managers, and there was some 
talk of changing the policy to stock, 
if business didn't pick up. The change 
came within the past two weeks. 
Vaudeville will be continued, it is said. 

Newark doesn't seem to believe dol- 
lar vaudeville is worth a dollar or sev- 
enty-five cents even. The smaller 
houses here that play three shows* 
daily draw the biggest share of the 
vaudeville patronage. 

The F. F. Proctor big time vaude- 
ville houses (5th Ave., New York, and 
Proctor's, Newark) have been added to 
the list of houses enrolled in the United 
Booking Offices-Orpheum Circuits 
joint press bureau. 



WORCESTER'S POLTS IS OPEN. 
Worcester, Mass., Oct. 2. 

The new S. Z. Poli theatre, seating 
about 2,800 people, opened Monday 
with a Poli vaudeville program. 

A stock company has possession of 
the other Poli theatre here. 



TRIPLE ALLIANCE REPORT. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The affiliation of the Fisher-Levy- 
Webster circuits running between Chi- 
cago and the Pacific Coast is in the 
wind again. It is said the trio of agents 
will incorporate under the laws of 
Illinois, and appoint a central represen- 
tative with headquarters in Chicago, 
who will supply the three circuits with 
desirable attractions. 

Neither of the circuits is represented 
here at present. 



MIDDLETON IN BLMIRA. 

George W. Middleton, formerly as- 
sociated with Mozart in the conduct of 
a chain of "pop" vaudeville houses in 
Pennsylvania, is going it alone. He 
has taken over the lease of the Family, 
Elmh*a, and will run it as a vaudeville 
house. Walter Plimmer has under- 
taken to supply the attractions. 



H. R. JACOBS PICKS VODE. 

H. R. Jacobs has arranged with 
Walter J. Plimmer to book in an eight- 
act vaudeville bill representing about 
$1,500 to fill in between* legitimate at- 
tractions at Jacobs' new Albany, N. Y., 
theatre. 

The house will open Oct. 14, pre- 
senting vaudeville as the initial attrac- 
tion. 



GIVES UP IN ONEIDA. 

Oneida, N. Y., Oct. 2. 

The Madison, a new theatre recently 
opened and which played pop vaude- 
ville booked by the Family Department 
of the United Booking Offices, has 
given up the variety policy. The house 
will cling to the combination shows 
until another vaudeville booking con- 
nection may be made. 

The Madison started off without op- 
position of any kind. 



KELLERMANN IN BAI/TIMORE. 

Baltimore, Oct. 4. 

Although J. L. Kernan, owner of the 
Auditorium, and who leased it to the 
Shuberts, objected to William Morris' 
Annette Kellermann Road Show play- 
ing there this week, Miss Kellermann 
and her company opened Monday. 
From here the show goes to the Bel- 
asco, Washington, for next week, con- 
tinuing over the Shubert city time. 

Kernan runs the Maryland with high 
class vaudeville. He did not want the 
Kellermann Show in opposition. 

Monday morning F. C. Schan- 
berger, manager of the Maryland, and 
Mr. Kernan's closest business associ- 
ate, stated the Kellermann show would 
appear unmolested. Said Mr. Schan- 
berger, "The Auditorium is under 
lease to the Shuberts with two more 
years to run — and the agreement ex- 
pressly forbids them playing vaude-> 
ville attractions. While strictly speak- 
ing the Kellermann show is a vaude- 
ville attraction, still there is, I am 
informed, a story or slender plot run- 
ning through the entertainment that 
technically places it in the musical' 
comedy category. We took the mat- 
ter up with the Shuberts and upon 
their promise to adhere strictly in the 
future to the terms of the lease, Mr. 
Kernan decided to waive further ob- 
jections." 

A report in New York had it the 
United Booking Offices induced Mr. 
Kernan to forego his intended injunc- 
tion proceedings against the Shuberts 
and the Kellermann show. No one 
exactly understood the whys and 
wherefores of the United's sudden 
friendliness, but the story appearedl 
authentic. 



RAY RERGER INSANE. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 
Ray Berger, who played here as a 
comedian three years ago, was ad- 
judged insane at Fresno and commit- 
ted to the State Insane Asylum. 
Berger imagines he is a Salvation 
Army colonel. 



CANCELLING "OPPOSITION ACTS." 

Philadelphia, Oct 2. 

The restriction against acts playing 
the "opposition" small time in this city 
is being enforced, more so than ever. 
Last week Neil McKinley played the 
Nixon, one of the Nixon-Nirdlinger 
houses, and he lost a route booked by 
the United Booking offices. Another 
act is reported to have suffered a like 
fate. 

The report, of the cancellations 
caused considerable unrest about 
town. The Liberty and Keystone, 
booked by M. W. Taylor, are also be- 
ing closely watched by the United and 
acts have been ordered out of both 
houses. It was understood that both 
Nixon-Nirdlinger and Taylor had been 
negotiating with the United. The 
Nixon is in opposition to the William 
Penn, booked through the United. 

Next week the first of the Sullivan- 
Considine booked bills will play the 
Nixon under the recent booking ar- 
rangement entered into. 



The Four Huntings, with Harry Fern 
replacing Tony Hunting, break in their 
new act "out of town." 



VARIETY 



VAUDEVILLE ACTORS TALK 

OF "OPPOS ITION FUND" 

Movement to Raise Money by Subscription to Insure 

Opposition on Big Time. William Morris Reported 

Approached to Take Charge. Nearly All Artists 

Said to be Very Much Dissatisfied With 

Present Conditions. 



Vaudeville actors are now talking 
about raising a fund by subscription for 
the support of an "opposition circuit" to 
the present big time vaudeville circuits. 
Several of the better-known artists, who 
have savings stored away, are said to 
be promoting the movement. They see 
no hope of betterment in the near fu- 
ture, unless big time vaudeville is re- 
vived by "opposition." 

A report had it William Morris has 
been approached with a view of having 
him head the "opposition." Morris gave 
no decided answer, it is stated, saying 
his plans for the season were mapped 
out, and he couldn't say how he would 
stand if the proposition to instill new 
life into the first class vaudeville field 
took definite form. 

Shortly before Morris transferred his 
vaudeville theatres to the Loew Circuit, 
thereby removing them from the "op- 
position" to the big time in vaudeville, 
Variety in an editorial called upon the 
White Rats to investigate current con- 
ditions, and if necessary bolster up the 
Morris Circuit, to prevent "opposition" 
from disappearing. Poorly advised at 
the time, the Rats tried to laugh away 
the suggestion. This, with many other 
things of those days, became an error 
of judgment on the part of the actors' 
Organization. When the Morris Cir- 
cuit failed to longer exist as the big 
time opposition, nothing else in the way 
of real combatants to the big time ap- 
peared. 

Conditions have grown from bad to 
worse in that division, until now they 
are at about the point Variety often 
predicted they would be with no op- 
position. 

The standard vaudeville artists, even 
those playing just now on the big time, 
recognize the situation. All are very 
much dissatisfied with the prospects. 
It is said that this has been causing 
small groupes of artists here and there 
over the country to talk matters over, 
with the result the movement appears 
to be gaining some headway. 

No one excepting Mr. Morris has 
been named in connection with the re- 
ports. It is unlikely a big vaudeville 
man could be induced to take the lead- 
ership of an opposition in vaudeville 
unless a stock company with a large 
paid-in capital were to be formed, with 
an agreement giving the general man- 
ager full freedom in'ruhning its affairs. 



GOMPERS MAY INVESTIGATE. 

The whole controversy of the 
White Rats Actors' Union and labor 
may be presented to President Samuel 
Gompers, of the American Federation 
of Labor, for review. At its last meet- 
ing the General Executive Committee 
of the New... York Central Federated 
trfnin, itecided to request- the national 
officer to investigate the whole matter 



This action was taken after the read- 
ing of a letter from O'Brien & Male- 
vinsky, counsel for the W. R. A. U., in 
which the charge is made that the C. F. 
U. has violated the mandate of Presi- 
dent Gompers who ruled that the W. R. 
A. U. was a self-governing body. The 
lawyer's letter bringing up a charge of 
disobedience to the national labor or- 
ganization, brings the whole issue up 
anew. 

* 

The grievence of the White Rats 
Actors' Union No. 5, a branch 
of the White Rats Actors' Union of 
America, was presented to the meeting 
of the New York federated Union a 
few days ago. Harry DeVeaux who 
was expelled by the W. R. A. U., but a 
member in Local No. 5, presented the 
case. Mr. DeVeaux mentioned in his 
protest that he represented 200 mem- 
bers in good standing of the organiza- 
tion. Local No. 5, it was represented, 
paid into the White Rats Actors' Union 
$700 a year, but was denied admittance 
to the meetings of the W. R. A. U. 
board of directors. "When they desired 
to report a grievance at a certain East 
Side theatre," says the minutes oiF the 
meeting, "The Board of Directors told 
them not to bother, but to settle it 
themselves." 

Following is the letter which was 
referred to the General Executive Com- 
mittee: 

.. M „ . « v „ "September 13. 1912. 
'Mr. Ernest Bohm. Secretary to Central Fed- 
erated Union, 210 B. Btb St., New York. 
"Deur Sir:— 

'The Wblte Rats Actors' Union of Amer- 
ica baa referred to ua a clipping of a re- 
port circulated by you on behalf of the Cen- 
tral Federated Union through the malls, pur- 
porting to contain statements made by Harry 
DeVeaux. the contents of which are malicious- 
ly untru.hful and clearly libelous. Although 
the executive council of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor has clearly decided that 
your organ. nation has no lurlsdlctlon what- 
soever and the by-laws and the constitution 
of that body plainly and specifically states that 
your organization has no authority to enter- 
tain any charges or complaints by an ex* 
member of a national organisation, yet you not 
only openly violate the mandate or the pa- 
rent organisation *~om *-hlch you take your 
being, but also lis by-laws, and permit ma- 
licious and libelous statements that are un- 
true and unfounded to be made before your 
members and then to be circulated by a 
printed report of the proceeding. 

"Whereas, the disposition of our clients has 
been to co-operate with Its associate organl- 
zatlons that are members of the American 
Federation of Labor and to rellelously live 
UP to its obligations as regards these or- 
ganisations and the parent organization and 
respect ordinary rules of decency and cour- 
tesy In their business relations with asso- 
ciated organizations, yet the persistent, illegal 
an1 unjustifiable attitude of your organiza- 
tion in Dubllshlng scandalous, libelous and 
maliciously untruthful statements, charging 
the officers with dishonesty and looting the 
treasury of the White Rtas Actors' Union 
of America, and that the finances of the 
organization were In such a condition as to 
justify receivership, must stop, even if it b« 
necessary for our clients to seek legal re- 
dress in all Its forms against your asso- 
ciates and yourself who are participating in 
the circulation of these libelous statements. 

"The Object of this letter is to notify 
vou. on** th^ou^h von. earn and every mem- 
ber of the Central Federated Union, that my 
clients will promptly seek legal redress for 
anv transgression of their rlahts that the Cen- 
tral Federated Union or ajy of its member* 
may be guilty of. 

"Very trulv vours 

■•DENNIfl F.-O'BRIBN • 

and 
"M. L.. MALEVTNSKY. 
"Per Dennis F.' O'Brien. 
"Atty. for W. R. A. U. of A." 



INSURGENTS NOTIFIED. 

Performers with the Selli-Floto Cir- 
cus who refused to walk out a short 
time ago on orders from the White 
Rats Actors' Union headquarters in 
New York, have received formal let- 
ters • "notifying" them to appear for 
trial before the Board of Directors 
within thirty days. The letter sets 
forth: 

"New York, Sept. 17, 1912. 

"Charges have been preferred against 
you by Brother Abner Ali for viola- 
tion of your obligation as a member 
of this organization in that you re- 
fused to obey the orders and remain 
loyal to the Order at the time of the 
trouble with the Sells-Floto Circus at 
Omaha, Aug. 50. 

"These charges were pi iced before 
the Board of Directors at their meet- 
ing in accordance with the by-laws, 
and the Board of Directors instructed 
me to notify you to appear before 
them for trial of these charges with- 
in thirty (30) days. 

"At the regular Tuesday night meet- 
ing of the Lodge, the further reom- 
mendation of the Board of Directors 
that you be suspen-lcJ for thirty days, 
pending trial, wis approved ami 
adopted by a unanimous vote. 

"You will, therefore, note that you 
are . suspended fr >m all privileges of 
the organization for thirty <iay« from 
trial of the charges preferred against 
you by Brother Ali. Th.» meetings of 
the Board of Directo.s are held regu- 
larly each Tuesday at noon, therefore 
you will please state to us when it 
will be convenient for ycu to appear 
or to have the brother siting as at- 
torney for you present your case. 
"Yoori fraternally, 
(Signed) "W. W. WATERS, 
"Secretary Board of Directors" 



AFRAID OF SMALL TIME. 

The United Booking Offices man- 
agers are watching the small timers 
just now very closely in the bookiags 
Several big time acts in receipt of a 
large salary are known to be negotiat- 
ing with the smaller circuits. Last* 
week the United "pulled" an act away 
from the Loew people, just as it was 
about to be signed by giving it a route. 

The big time acts not working con- 
tinuously are openly saying nowadays 
they will accept the best offer in sight, 
on any time, if the United does not 
furnish them with a satisfactory route 
shortly. 

It is expected that when Sullivan- 
Considine and Loew booking agencies 
move into their new offices in the Hei- 
delberg Building, several announce- 
ments of important bookings will float 
Broadwayward. The joint agency ia 
due to start business next wee*. 



BROWN'S CIRCUS REOPENS. 

Frank Brown's circfis opened Sept. 
23 at Buenos Aires, for a ten-week en- 
gagement under the management of 
Roy Chandler. Brown was the victim 
of incendiaries several years ago. The 
leading newspaper, La Prensa, con- 
ducted a propaganda agafnst Brown 
being allowed to show on one of the 
main streets. It ended by a mob burn- 
ing the circus to- the ground: Br Own 
later gained a verdict -against La Pren- 
sa, but it has not been satisfied. ' 



TRAINOR ARGUMENT SET. 

The application of Val Trainor for 
a mandamus compelling his reinstate- 
ment as a member of the White Rats 
Actors' Union, from which he was ex- 
pelled, was set for argument yester- 
day morning in Part 1, Special Tertfi 
of the Supreme Court where Justice* 
Greenbaum is presiding. Summer & 
Murray represented Trainor. 

Xha. hearing was postponed from 
Wednesday by agreement between 
counsel. 



YOUNG BUT AMBITIOU8L 

The new act of Rawson and Clare's — 
to be billed as "Frances Clare and Her 
Eight Girl Friends, in 'Mary's Party* 
with Guy Rawson," has advertised for 
chorus girls of the pony class. The 
following letter is one of the . many 
humorous replies received: 

»*—_ Hutchinson. Kan., Sept. 26. 1M2. 

Rawson and Clare, 

Now York. 
Gentlemen. 

I saw your ad In tho VARIETY paper 
-wanted chorus girls. I am Just crasy to 
ajp on the stage. I hoy a VARIETY every 
other week. Wen. I don't suppose you would 
let me he one. Let me tell you why. I am 
a boy of 14 years old and would like to 
get on the stage. But, listen, I am going 
to tell the truth, as wen •« truth can bo 
told. I won ten dollars for being an ama- 
teur chorus girl. I expect you wlH laugh at 
me for doing this, but I know how to dance 
end sing. I have a form just like a girt. 

But in some ways I am not like a jprt, 
but when I get all dressed up In short, fluffy 
skirts and paint and powdered I can't be told 
from a chorus girl. 

I have been asked why don't I go on the 
ptage. but I didn't know how to get on. I 
can kick higher than my head and 1 am 
5 feet 2 Inches tall. My leg shore my knee 
measures 12 Inchee «round and I can dance 
as well as any old chorus girl. 

Oentlemen, I would surprise you. I wish 
you could see me once when I am all dressed 
up. I know I would make a hit But, oh, 
could you tell me a place I could get It 
makes no difference what part I play. 

Well, I suppose I hare got you to laugh? 
lng or saying what does he amount to. Oh. 
1 wish I could be a ohorus airl tin t am 
seventeen an*now. 

Well, this Is atl I got to say but please 
let me hesr from you soon. 

MR. ERNEST CRAIO. 

The new Rawson and Clare number 
opens Nov. 11 at the Empress, Cincin- 
nati, having been booked as a headline 
attraction by Chris O. Brown for the 
Sullivan-Considine Circuit. 



FUR FLIB8 IN OKLA. 

Reports reached New York this 
week of the hottest circus billing fights 
in recent years in Oklahoma, where 
Sells-Floto, Buffalo Bill and the Bar- 
nam-Bailey circus are in close oppo- 
sition. The Barnum-Bailey people, 
it was reported, went as far as tear- 
ing down and covering opposition 
paper. 

Modern circus men agree that coher- 
ing up billing fights were a source of 
serious loss to both parties, and It 
had become one of the recognized 
amenities to refrain from the practice. 



OORBETT8 CONDITION GRAVB. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. 

James J. Corbett was operated on 
for appendicits in the Jefferson Hos- 
pital yesterday afternoon. At, that 
time his condition was reported as ex- 
tremely grave owing to the hold the 
disease had taken on the patient. 

Corbett was taken ill Tuesday at his 
hotel. Jim Daly, a former sparring 
partner, had him removed to the hos- 
pital. An immediate operation was 
necessary, as the physicians discov- 
ered the appendix had been ruptured 
and" peritonitis had already developed. 
The former champion was the feature 
act- of the- bill at the People's this 
week. 



VARIETY 



CABARET PEOPLE ARE WISER; 
DEMAND OPEN C OMPETITION 

Turning Down Attempted Control of Cabaret Business by 

United Offices New Booking Department. Cabaret 

Bills Increasing to Large Amounts in Salary. 



According to circumstantial stories 
in circulation this week, the Cabaret 
Department of the United Booking Of- 
fices is going out after the restaurant 
show business, after the same manner 
as that employed by the main branch 
of the agency concern. 

The Cabaret Department has even 
declared an embargo on acts playing 
eating* places booked through independ- 
ent agents. A singer was notified that 
she could not appear at the Cafe Boule- 
vard (booked by the Metropolitan 
Booking Office). It was represented 
the singer was wanted to appear at the 
Cadillac, and was taken from the Boule- 
vard show for that reason. The singer, 
who has been playing club engagements 
for the United, retired from the bill. 

Thereupon the Metropolitan agency 
notified the Cadillac if it played any 
U. B. O. acts, all Metropolitan book- 
ings would be discontinued. The Cad- 
illac manager replied that there was no 
intention on his part to switch to the 
United. 

The United is trying every means to 
reach for this Cabaret business. The 
United is said to have represented to 
the manager of the Boulevard that con- 
tracts had passed between the United 
and half a dozen of the principal res- 
taurants, including Shanley's, Maxim's 
and the Folies Bergere. This was 
proven to be untrue. 

A possible reason for the energy of 
the U. B. O. is the fact that with the 
approach of the winter season, Cabaret 
shows are assuming astonishing pro- 
portions. Louis Martin is reported to 
have paid $300 for Josephine Sabel last 
week, while Kaiser & Morton, pro- 
prietors of the Folies Bergere, offered 
$1,000 for a week's services of Ethel 
Levy. Martin has declared that at the 
height of the season he will be ready 
to test out a show costing as much as 
$3,000 a week. The Shanley Cabaret 
bill is understood to cost not much un- 
der $1,400 and Churchill's, $800. 

It is also reported Cabaret managers 
around New York have been informed 
if they will book exclusively through 
the United, they can select any act 
wanted from the large vaudeville the- 
atres in town, and the act will be fur- 
nished them for after-theatre perform- 
ances. This seemed so obviously a bait 
the offer carried no influence with the 
Cabaret people. 

One restaurant manager stated to a 
Variety representative he had been ap- 
proached by a U. B. O. representative 
to handle the Cabaret feature of his 
restaurant, but had declined to enter 
into any agreement. 

"It would be foolish," said he, "for 
me to make that kind of an arrange- 
ment. I want all agents to submit acts. 
I will take what I want, getting them 
much better and cheaper than by being 
tied down to one agency that can put 
stuff in here of any kind at any price 
it may want to. I may not know much 



about acts, but I know enough to rea- 
lize that open competition will give me 
the best show at the lowest price. 

"The United is promising restaurants 
everything in the world," said a book- 
ing agent who specializes in Cabarets, 
"But we are not at all disturbed. It is 
true that by means of their specious 
promises they secured two small places 
in Brooklyn from an agent over there 
not long ago, but its experience at the 
Cadillac was most discouraging. The 
U. B. O. could not (or at any rate it 
did not) deliver, and if any deal had 
been made, it was called off after a very 
brief trial, 

"They fell down at the Folies Ber- 
gere. The first act they sent to the 
restaurant was an xylophone. It work- 
ed once and then was retired. 

"A Cabaret specialist would have 
known better than pick such an act for 
such a restaurant. It takes experience 
and an intimate knowledge of Cabaret 
audiences and performers to handle this 
class of business successfully. It's a 
different business from booking vaude- 
ville theatres. The specialists have 
* built up their business slowly and the 
big stick methods of the United will 
have no effect." 

An interesting feature of the Cabaret 
craze developed a few days ago, when 
several restaurants began to bid against 
each other for the services of a popu- 
lar singer who had established herself 
as a favorite at a Broadway restaurant. 
She was finally secured at an advance 
of salary by a rival boniface. 

This is the first important instance 
of competitive bidding for attractions. 
The tendency, in consideration of the 
active bidding for "name" attractions, 
is bound to send Cabaret prices soaring 
in a short time. 

The inevitable result will be that they 
will have to still further raise menu 
prices and this process involves the 
grave danger of driving away patron- 
age, by the very means taken up origin- 
ally to attract it. 



WHEEL SHOW SHIFTS. 

The Eastern Burlesque Wheel Cen- 
sor Committee made its report to the 
Columbia Co. directors early this week 
after its return from a swing around 
the wheel. One of the committee- 
men said no radical changes had been 
ordered in the shows, although minor 
shifts had been ordered. 

A new cast of principals joined the 
Orientals (Western Wheel) in Chi- 
cago this week (not the "Stars of 
Stageland," as previously reported). 
The latter show is playing Newark 
this week with several new people in 
the cast and with a new scenic and 
costume production. Odiva is with the 
show as strengthener. 

"The Girls from Reno" is under- 
going some minor changes in Philadel- 
phia this week under the supervision 
of George Totten Smith. 



STAGE PURIFIER CONVICTED. 

Toronto, Oct. 2. 

The crusade in this city directed; 
against suggestive stage performance 
came to a smashing climax in the con- 
viction of Rev. R. B. St. Claire, secre- 
tary of the local purifiers' league, on 
a charge of circulating improper lit- 
erature. He was released under sus- 
pended sentence. Mr. St. Claire caused 
to be circulated a printed description 
of one of the Western Burlesque 
Wheel shows which played the Stan 
last season. 

Following his conviction, the police 
notified Dan Pierce, manager of the 
Star, that hereafter there would be no 
police censorship of his stage. The 
shows must "clean up" before they 
open. If the first performance con- 
tains anything offensive, said the police 
official, every performer concerned as 
well as the house and show manager 
will be arrested forthwith. 

Pierce appears to take the warning 
seriously. He and W. C. Cameron, 
manager of "Zallah's Own Company," 
which occupies the Star's stage this, 
week, collaborated on the following 1 , 
letter of instructions to the people of 
the organization: 

"A peculiar situation exists at pres- 
ent in the city of Toronto, which af- 
fects the Star theatre in particular, and 
the Police Department is drawn into 
the matter in a manner that has caused 
the Chief of Police to issue orders that 
the first offence against the standard 
of morals laid down by the law is to 
be followed by the arrest of the of- 
fender and every member of the com- 
pany with which the guilty party is 
connected. Hitherto it has been cus- 
tomary for the censor to view the first 
performance Monday afternoon and! 
suggest 'cuts' and changes, now the 
cuts must be made before the first 1 
show. 

"Damn and Hell must go. No double 
entendre will be permitted. The girls 
must not lift their skirts in any num- 
ber. The song, "Keep Away from the 
Fellow That Owns an Automobile,^ 
was cut out of the Orientals after the 
first show. It is not permitted here. 
"Cut out 'ragging.' 'turkey trotting* 
or any of that class of dancing. The 
girls must be particular not to do the 
least thing that the severest critic 
could construe as a suggestive move- 
ment. 

"We cannot put in written words 
how much depends on what is said and 
done by the Zallah company during 
this engagement. Sacrifice laughs, 
omit situations that could possibly give 
offence, or actions that people who are 
sore on the house could describe as 
immoral. 

"Remember, what goes even to a 
lady audience in the States does not 
go in Toronto. 

"We desire Mr. Nichols to read this 
to the entire company, to confer with 
Mr. Pierce, the house manager, and 1 , 
in every way to defeat the enemies of 
the Star theatre and assist our sensible 
friends of the Police Department, who 
are in self-defence driven to extreme* 
measures." 



rRiftmiFAM* j.pt out. 

Charles Burkhardt, principal come- 
dian, and the majority of the members 
of Max Spicgl's "Winning Widows" 
company (Eastern Burlesque Wheel), 
received "notice" Saturday night. 
Spiegl retained the leading woman and 
some of the choristers. New people 
have been engaged. 

Burkhardt has a three years' con- 
tract with Spiegl. 



STARTING NEW GAYETY. 

Cincinnati, Oct. 2. 
The start of the new Eastern Bur- 
lesque Wheel theatre, Gayety, in this 
city has been started by the tearing 
down of the old buildings on the site. 
The new house will likely not open be- 
fore the season of '13-'14. 



ONE EASTERN LAY-OFF. 

With the opening of the New Gayety, 
Detroit, the only lay-off week on the 
Eastern Wheel comes during the 
jump from Omaha into Chicago. 



REHEARSE ONLY IN NEW YORK. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. 

The Jacobs & Jermon shows on the 
Eastern Burlesque Wheel will rehearse 
each summer hereafter in New York. 
The attempt to prepare the productions 
in Philadelphia have proven a failure, 
through chorus girls refusing to live 
over here at the extra expense during 
the rehearsal time. 

This past summer Jacobs & Jermon 
were obliged to take any girls they 
could find for choristers, after having 
engaged a regular set of choristers in 
New York, who would not leave their 
relatives or friends over there. 



BRACING "TROCADEROS." 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

Chas. H. Waldron's "Trocaderos" 

show is being braced up this week by 

Dan Dody, who came on Sunday to see 

the production at the Star and Garter. 



TAKES OFF BURLESQUE STOCK. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The Dewey, Minneapolis, and the 
Star, St. Paul, formerly Western 
Wheel houses, have decided to give 
up stock burlesque. 

The small time and big time vaude- 
ville in both cities proved to be too 
strong an opposition force. 



EUGENE KERNAN LOW. 

Washington, Oct. 2. 

At the age of 80 Eugene Kernan is 
suffering from Bright's disease. At 
the George Washington University 
Hospital, where he has been placed, 
the physicians give little hope for his 
recovery. 

Mr. Kernan is manager of the West- 
ern Burlesque Wheel theatre, Lyceum. 



Loie Frances Coleman, wife of Har- 
ry Coleman, an actor, gave birth to a 
rwelve-pound boy Sept. 19. 



"AMERICAN BEAUTIES" OPENING. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

J. C. Marshall will open his regu- 
lar season with "The American Beau- 
ties," Oct. 10. The company will carry 
thirty people and special paper. 

Sam Leavitt will manage. Edwin 
Lang retains his interest in the organi- 
zation. 



Geo. F. Hall and Mort Fox sailed on 
the Baltic Sept. 26, for the other side. 



VARIETY 




niETY 



Published Weekly by 
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LONDON 

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PARIS 

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II Karl St. 
R. A. LETT 



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Entered as second-cla ss matter at New York. 
Vol. XXVIII. October 4, 1912 No. 5 

Walter Jones has taken his old role 
in "Baby Mine." 



Harry Jolson returned Sunday from 
the other side. 

Alexander and Scott will sail for 
England shortly. 

"The Madcaps" are with "Tantalizing 
Tommy," booked by Max Hart. 

Gretchen Lowe is in New York. She 
is a "single" from the other side. 
Jenie Jacobs has the booking direction. 

Princess Rajah sails Oct. 8, to open 
at the Wintergarten, Berlin, Dec. 1. 
Until that date she will rest. 

The Avon Comedy Four will have 
a new act next season, intended as a 
sequel to their present offering. 

Clifford Fischer returned to New 
York last Friday, and will sail again 
for England Oct. 8. 



Manny and Roberts have been book- 
ed for the Alhambra, London, by Max 
Hart, opening in the spring. 

Nevins and Gordon open for a Euro- 
pean tour in June. They were booked 
by B. A. Myers. 

Karl Emmy's Pets have been booked 
at the London Alhambra next April, 
by Will Collins and Claude Bostock. 



Tell Taylor is hack from a month's 
•tay in the West, spending some time 
in Chicago. 

John T. Murray, after touring the 
complete Sullivan-Considine Circuit, 
has returned to New York. 

Thomas Jackson and Co. (three 
people) have a newly written sketch 
by John Stokes, entitled "Special De- 
livery." 



Edward Weil, general press repre- 
sentative for H. H. Fraxee, is writing 
the dramatic reviews of the New York 
shows for the College Magazine. 

Felix Adler has been placed to open 
on the Moss' Empires, England, com- 
mencing June 2, 1913. The Marinelli 
New York Agency did it. 

Raymond W. Jones, manager of the 
Royal Marine band, and Elma Worthy 
of Los Angeles, were married Septem- 
ber 17. 



»» 



Max Witfs "Melody Lane Girls" 
are not with Lasky's "Some Banjo 
act. They open their regular season 
on the United time, October 7. 

"Peck's Bad Boy" is slated for reviv- 
al on the road. Charles Alphin will 
direct the production. Bud Duncan 
will be featured. 

Emma Francis, in her new act with 
three Arabs, is reported considering 
an offer for Europe that will mean an 
absence from this side of over a year, 
if accepted. 

"Gypsy Love," with Phyllis Par- 
tington and Arthur Albro in the prin- 
cipal roles, opens in Trenton, Oct. 12, 
going thence to Philadelphia for a 
run. 

"Circumstantial Evidence," the Har- 
rison Armstrong dramatic piece, with 
the original cast, including Harry 
Burkhardt, opens on the Sullivan- 
Considine Circuit at Cincinnati Oct. 6. 



The West End, New York, resumed 
its combination policy under the Shu- 
bert management Monday, when 
"Bunty Pulls the Strings" opened for 
a week. 

The Wilson and Marshall Theatrical 
League has headquarters in the Cadil- 
lac Hotel, presided over by Mason Pe- 
ters, Edward E. Pidgeon and Blair 
Fraser. 

Helena Phillips Evans has replaced 
Mrs. Stuart Robson in "The Woman 
Haters Club." Flo Irwin, at first se- 
lected for the substitution, remains 
with "Mme. Sherry." 

Maybelle Fisher, the lyric soprano, 
has signed a five weeks' contract with 
the Western States Circuit through' her 
husband, Fred Zobedie, for a consecu- 
tive engagement in San Francisco. 

Jack Clifford may go with the new 
Ziegfeld "Follies." Pending the closing 
of the contracts, he has declined Cab- 
aret dates. Clifford was formerly at 
Shanley's. 

Louis A. Hirsch, the composer, who 
has been engaged to write the music 
for the Hippodrome, London, revues, 
will sail for the other side late in No- 
vember. 

Harry Ferns, who has eschewed the 
resined ring for the footlights, is ap- 
pearing with Allan Benedict and Co. in 
a vaudeville act that deals with a race- 
track episode 



May Ward opens Monday as the 
headline at the Miles', Minneapolis, 
with the other Miles theatres at Mil- 
waukee, Detroit and Chicago following. 
The booking was made through Free- 
man Bernstein. 

Mrs. James B. Donovan is at her 

home in Cleveland. The Rena Arnold, 
billed at the Academy of Music, Buf- 
falo, is not Mrs. Donovan, who is pro- 
fessionally known as Rena A. Arnold, 
of Donovan and Arnold. 

Bart Barle, the banjoist, has been 
engaged to act in "talking pictures" for 
the Gaumont Co. He will leave for 
Europe in February. The engagement 
was arranged through Leo Masse of 
the Marinelli office. 

Charlotta Hurdos celebrated her 
second ' anniversary Monday as Paul 
Durand's secretary, hookeeper and 
stenographer. Miss Hurdus says she 
has learned at lot since minding Mr. 
Durand's office. 

Leo Hayes, the original Mr. Newly- 
wed of "The Newlyweds and Their 
Baby," has been engaged for Leffier- 
Bratton's "Merry Go Rounders" (East- 
ern Wheel), joining the show next 
Monday at the Bastable, Syracuse. He 
replaces Jack Dempsey. 

The Lyceum, Amsterdam, N. Y., has 
changed hands. George H. Van De- 
mark has taken it over. The former 
lessee was Joseph Galaise. The vaude- 
ville policy will be continued. Walter 
Plimmer will book the acts instead of 
the U. B. O. 

Mrs. A. Fuller Golden, widow of 
George Fuller Golden, has opened the 
Fuller-Golden apartments at 715 Bixel 
street, Los Angeles, where she expects 
to house members of the profession. 
Mrs. Golden has a brand new place 
with reading and billiard rooms. 

The company which toured this 
country last season in "The Passing of 
the Third Floor Back," is due to arrive 
in New York Sunday. Ian Robertson, 
who is to head the organization again 
is already in the city, having arrived 
from London late last week. 

The date of the opening for Hurtig 
& Seamon's new Colonial, in Toledo, 
has been set for Oct. 14. The head- 
liner of the opening bill will be Vic- 
tor Moore. The Colonial has a ca- 
pacity of 1,800. Oren Donovan will 
occupy the post of house manager. 

In William Faversham's revival of 
"The Merchant of Venice," Julie Opp 
plays Portia, and Jane Wheatley 
Cleopatra in "Julius Caesar." The 
male support embraces Tyrone Power, 
Frank Keenan, Fuller Mellish and Lio- 
nel Belmore. 



R. R. Roberts was in New York last 
week getting things in readiness for 
the opening of his new musical play, 
"The Pink Mask." The show, with 
eighteen people, was originally sched- 
uled to get going Sept. 21 but Roberts 
has now arranged for the company to 
open about Oct 7 somewhere in the 
South 



Pearl Neilson, after an enforced lay- 
off, has resumed her soubret role with 
"The Goddess Of Liberty" tour. 

John E. Henshaw and Grace Avery 
have gained so much popularity on 
their western tour of the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit, it is said, a local demand for a 
return date by the couple has been 
sent in to Orpheum theatre managers 
at various points. 

Thos. A. Ballantyne, of Newport, 
Ky. is seeking some trace of two of 
his children. One of them married 
Charles Vincent in Cleveland in 1873. 
Her mother and she went on the stage 
under the name of Morrell Sisters. 
The other, Jos. Ballantyne, probably is 
appearing under the name of Bayne. 

Jos Aliens, trainer of the monkey, 
"Peter the Great," is in Roosevelt 
Hospital with both collar bones brok- 
en, the result of an automobile acci- 
dent. It was at first feared that the 
trainer had suffered a fracture of the 
skull, but after an examination Sun- 
day, the doctors declared that there 
was no danger to be feared from this 
source. 

Carlton Hoagland mentioned the 
other dsy to a crowd of his intimates 
that an apartment in a hotel on Times 
Square he had looked at did not suit. 
"The atmosphere of the place wasn't 
right," added Mr. Hoagland. "That's 
*just the trouble with my flat, too," 
said Lee Muckenfuss. "Between the 
steam pipes and the gas, I don't like 
it either." 

Ths Four Harveys will return to 
New York Oct. 7. With them will 
arrive Josie Rooney, who is return- 
ing with her two children. Miss Roo- 
ney married Percy Harvey about four 
years ago, while the Rooney Sisters 
were appearing abroad. Later Josie 
did a single on the other side. The 
Harveys are engaged for the Orpheum 
Circuit. 

Alf Reeves is due in New York 
Monday next on the Oceanic, which 
sailed Tuesday from Liverpool. He 
brings with him two vaudeville offer- 
ings. One of them is "The Village 
Sports," which has never been seen on 
this side. The other is "The Wow- 
Wows." Alf will arrive in time to 
"catch" his brother, Billie Reeves, in 
his new act, opening at the Fiftn Ave- 
nue Monday. 

When the C. D. Willard "Temple of 
Music" act opened at Liverpool Sept. 
3, it had been off the boat just five 
hours. Enroute Willard lost three 
trunks, one full of costumes. The act 
expected to open Sept. 9, but the con- 
tracts were changed for the 2d and by 
arriving the 3d the act opened a day 
late. There was no orchestra re- 
hearsal. The electric voltage was 230 
volts instead of 110 (as used in Amer- 
ica), the motors and electrical effects 
being put out of commission as a re- 
sult. The act is now working in good 
shape but it will take time to repair 
the damage done at the opening. Wil- 
lard plays the Empire, Glasgow, next 
week 



10 



VARIETY 



STORM SIGNALS FLYING 

IN BI O TIME VAUDEVILLE 

Leander Richardson Says the Powers of Vaudeville In Try- 
ing to "Hog" Are Working Against Themselves. How 
Lew Dockstader and Jeff De Angelis Were Treated. 
Bill Posters Hard Hit. New Lederer Piece. 



By LEANDER 

The group that is pleased to call itself 
The Powers in the vaudeville branch 
of the amusement business seems in- 
tent upon destroying the goose of the 
golden egg, by the process inelegant- 
ly but picturesquely known as "hog- 
ging it." That is to say, the men who 
have been most successful in the mat- 
ter of building up their fortunes in 
the two-a-day world, are not satisfied 
to let their wealth and power go on 
in the natural course of increase, but 
insist on trying to squeeze out every 
penny there is in the game, at the ex- 
pense of everybody else, including the 
performers. 

The other day in Boston Paul Keith 
was telling friends of a particularly 
smart piece of repartee that serves as 
an illustration of the situation as it 
exists at present. According to this 
story, Lew Dockstader was thinking 
seriously of devoting the present sea- 
son to vaudeville, before he made his 
minstrel alliance with George Prim- 
rose. 

"We will be glad to have you with 
us again," said the representative of 
The Powers. "What is the salary?" 

"Same as before, $1,000 a week," re- 
sponded the burnt cork artist, cheer- 
fully. 

"You will get $200," rejoined the 
vaudeville man — and that tells the 
story. 

The Powers wanted that other $800 
a week, or its equivalent in services, 
and they want the balance between 1 , 
the sums they previously gave other 
artists and what they propose to pay 
now. 

There was a great newspaper how- 
de-do recently about the accession of 
Jeff De Angelis to vaudeville. The 
Powes gave him a couple of weeks 
or so around Chicago, where his name 
was strong as a star of musical com- 
edy, and sidetracked him. It was the 
same thing with Jack Gardner, to 
whom was held out a glittering pic- 
ture of what was going to happen but 
didn't. 

Last season a prominent producing 
manager — one of the very foremost — 
was induced to spend a fortnight of 
time and some money in getting a| 
one-act play of known quality rcady v 
for vaudeville on the understanding^ 
that it would be booked. It went to 
Union Hill as "a favor to the man- 
agement," and received $100 for the 
week, which was a great deal less v 
than the cost of preparation. After 
some weeks of "stringing," the act was 
turned down, in the face of its former 
success and the most glowing reports 
upon its quality. 

These and a number of other in- 
stances whjch I have in mind are of 
no great importance taken one by one, 
but as a whole they serve to show 



RICHARDSON 

a condition , that is extremely vital to 
the moment. 

Many of the known standard acts 
are being allowed to work for short 
periods and then, laid off : long enough 
to nullify their profits. There is a] 
state of dissatisfaction that is very, 
close to rebellion — and that means 
something beyond muttering. Pretty 
soon, in all likelihood, there will be\ 
a new circuit in vaudeville, or an old 
one reorganized upon a new basis. 
Some able men, who have been toy 
the wars before, and have learned the 
art of battle, are talking things over 
and storing ammunition. The air is 
full of the scent of combat. The Pow- 
ers are very close to having a formid- 
able scrap on their hands. 

Meanwhile, the "legitimate" man- 
agers who can use vaudeville artists 
in their business are quite happy, for 
offers of a continuous season's en-l 
gagement at considerably less thanl 
vaudeville prices command serious at- 
tention in the present crisis/ 
Bill Posters Hard Hit 

The big bill posting concerns in 
and around New York have been find- 
ing some pretty lean pickings ot late, 
as anyone may see by a passing glance 
at the "choice" boards. The theatres 
thus far this season have not been bill- 
ing at anything like the customary rate, 
and as a consequence the observer will 
notice an unusual number of the stock 
commercial posters which pay little or 
nothing for their display and are used 
as fillers when the profitable patronage 
is not plentiful. 

I notice that Mr. Belasco's "The 
Governor's Lady" and "The Case of 
Becky" appear on the billboards, al-( 
though this manager long ago discard- 
ed this form of advertising and in- 
creased his newspaper space. Inquiry 
in places supposed to be well informed 
in such matters brings the assertion 
that the Belasco stands are carried, 
gratis by the posting companies; with 
the idea that their sudden prominence 
along our thoroughfares will act as an 
incentive to managers in general to 
follow suit, on a cash basis. 

If this really is the idea, it has not 
been noticeably efficacious, for it did 
not take the theatre advertising men 
long to learn what was happening,) 
with the immediate result that a num- 
ber of orders were canceled and cer- 
tain theatres are being billed free of 
cost to the managers. I personally 
know of two of these. 

Perhaps the facts in the foregoing 
narrative may indicate that the bill- 
posting business in New York has' 
been overdone, and that the uplifters 
who think our city is made ugly by 
the display of illuminated printing may 
be on the verge of getting relief from 
an unexpected source. 



Woods Out of "Taxi." 

Al Woods usually is pictured as get- 
ting into theatrical ventures all over 
the place — rarely as getting out of 
them. Thus the news from an au- 
thoritative source in London that Mr. 
Woods has ceased to be interested in 
the English run of "The Girl in the 
Taxi" will surprise most readers here, 
the more so as the piece has made a 
great hit in the British capital. 

"They are selling seats to the mid- 
dle of January," writes my informant, 
"and the show is turning out to be 
another 'Merry Widow.' It now be- 
longs exclusively to Hugo Baruch & 
Co., and George B. McLellan, Mr. 
Woods having drawn out before the 
opening." 

McLellan is an American, who has 
been promoting various schemes in* 
London for the past dozen years. He 
is a brother of C. M. S. McLellan, 
who wrote "The Pink Lady" and "Oh! 
Oh! Delphine," and he formerly was 
George Lcderer's partner for a time 
in the Casino, New York. He also 
brought Emmy Wehlen to America. 

McLellan's final success with "The 
Girl in the Taxi" shows what a man 
is pretty sure to accomplish in Lon- 
don ultimately, if he keeps on plug- 
ging and doesn't get discouraged. 
Some London Hits. 

Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree seems 
to have put over a very strong suc- 
cess with "Drake," in which Lyn Hard- 
ing has scored so very heavily that it 
is hard for him to come away to his 
season's engagement with David Be- 
lasco. The receipts of the first week 
were 3,006 pounds sterling, or about 
$15,000, which is enormous business 
for London. 

"Everywoman," at the Drury Lane, 
is drawing much greater audiences 
than might have been looked for after 
the critics gave it their mixed verdict. 
The London letter 1 have receivedi 
says that Mr. Irving, as Nobody, gives 
a dreadfully bad performance, for 
which he receives $1,000 a week. On 
the othc hand, Alexandra Carlyle, in 
the title role, has made a profound 
impression and is hailed on every side 
as the best actress in London. "Every- 
woman" seems sure to continue pros- 
perously until the Christmas panto- 
mime season, which is a London insti- 
tution so firmly grounded that noth- 
ing short of an earthquake could move 
it. 



»» 



Hackett Wrote "Jim Blunt' 

The veil of mystery surrounding the 
authorship of "Honest Jim Blunt" 
must be ruthlessly torn away. The 
man who wrote this play is Walter 
Hackett, formerly dramatic editor of 
the New York American. It must be 
said for Mr. Hackett that "Honest Jim 
Blunt" has the making of a really good 
play and an excellent vehicle for the 
very qlever character actor, Tim 
Murphy. 

It is rather a pity tba,t the piece 
could not have been played for a 
month or so outside New York before 
being submitted to this community. In 
that case its shortcomings would have 
made themselves apparent and a profit- 
able run might have ensued. As it is, 
the play will be laid off until the al- 
terations are complete. It just missed 
fire through a weak last act, which 



probably will be replaced and "Honest 
Jim Blunt" seen again later on. 
Abie and His Monocle. 

I perceive that Abie Kaffenbergh, 
who used to illumine New York first 
nights with the splendors of his rai- 
ment, has a moving picture theatre in 
Paris, and I confess that I should like 
to look him over to see how the! 
French capital has affected his per- 
sonal embellishments. When Abie had 
been in London for a short time on hii 
first visit, Billy Fleishmann encount- 
ered him one morning in Piccadilly/ 
with a large black rimmed monocle in 
his eye, and Billy could not conceal a 
smile. 

"What are you laughing at — this?" 
inquired Kaffenbergh, pointing to the 
glass disc. 

"Not at all," said Fleishmann, "I am 
laughing at you. 1 * 
Woods Shows Wisdom. 

It is the part of wisdom in the A. H. 
Woods camp to close up the Western 
Within the Law" company. The coun- 
try at large is not strong for under- 
world plays — does not know what they 
are driving at, and evidently has no 
desire to find out. This was true of 
"Arsene Lupin," "The Deep Purple" 
and others, the notable exception be- 
ing "Alias Jimmy Valentine." 

In New Yorfr "Within the Law" is 
doing a smashing big business, and ev- 
idently is in for a long run, as shown 
by the advance sale. This naturally 
will help the play when it goes out af- 
terward. 

There is a story around town that 
Mr. Woods' new Eltinge Theatre sets 
him in only $22,000 a year for rental 
charges. If this is the fact, the house 
will be a veritable mint. 
Changes at Playhouse. 

When "Bought and Paid For" leaves 
New York at the end of the week, it 
will play Newark, Hartford, and then 
Boston. Up around the Playhouse, 
where the Broadhurst work has been 
in possession for a year, the task of 
getting ready for a new attraction is 
a strange experience, but is eased 
somewhat by the closing of the house 
for a general brushing up. "Little" 
Women" comes in a week from Mon- 
day, and will play Pittsburg in the in- 
terval. There are few changes in the 
company since last Spring. 
Stood Them Up. 

For the opening night of "Oh! Oh! 
Delphine," at the Knickerbocker Thea- 
tre, the advertisements warned the au- 
dience that the curtain would go up at 
8.10 and that those not in their seats 
would have to remain standing until 
the end of the first act. The curtain 
did not ascend promptly on the min- 
ute, but a whole lot of the regular, 
dawdlers were left, just the same, and 
did not get to their places till the act 
was finished. 

Some of these were pretty hot about 
what they considered an impertinence, 
and those who kicked got their money 
back and went their way. The main 
body, however, growled more or less 
audibly and took their medicine. Ap- 
parently they had thought the warning 
was neither a threat nor a promise, and 
that the play would await their pleas- 
ure as other plays had done so often 
in the past. 

The audience in general liked the 
(Continued on page 14.) 



VARIETY 



11 



SHOWS AT THE BOX OFFICE 

IN NEW YORK A ND CHICAGO 

Theatrical Year of '12-M3 Starting Madly off With Succes- 
sion of Hits. Many Shows Playing to Capacity at all 
Performances. "Bought and Paid For" Closing 
Long Metropolitan Run, $135,000 Winner. 



What a difference between the open- 
ing of last and the current theatrical 
yearl 

Here we are with the regular season 
not much over a month old and New 
York in the throes of over a dozen en- 
ormous successes, not counting the 
openings for the week. 

Several things are responsible for 
this condition of affairs in the metrop- 
olis — the principal one probably being 
a fortunate selection of good plays. By 
Oct. 1, 1911, there were nearly a score 
of failures as against less than half 
a dozen for the same period in 1912. 

Of the successful runs still here, but 
two are hold-overs from last season — 
"Bought and Paid For" and "Officer 
666." The former leaves Saturday night 
and is doing a good final week's busi- 
ness, as the original cast is being ad- 
vertised. In its run of a little over one 
solid year at the Playhouse it has made 
between $130,000 and $135,000. "Officer 
666" is still enjoying a profitable stay. 
Its run was broken by the hot weather, 
while "Bought and Paid For" ran right 
through the summer. 

"Broadway Jones" (Cohan). George 
M. Cohan, each year accused of being 
"written out," has put over another big 
success for himself at his own theatre. 
Playing to nearly as much as the house 
will hold— $12,000. 

"Fanny's First Play" (Comedy). Con- 
trary to all predictions, is drawing up- 
stairs business as well as in the or- 
chestra, and playing to $10,000 weekly. 

"Hanky Panky" (Broadway). About 
$12,000 a week, which, while profitable, 
is far from capacity. The weekly low- 
est takings during the nine weeks' stay 
have been $10,800. Has had about an 
average sale of $5,000 a week from the 
hotel ticket stands. Show leaves 
Nov. 2. 

"June Madness" (Fulton). Unquali- 
fied failure. 

"Man and Superman" (Hudson). Re- 
vival. Merely a filler in for time. 

"Mileatonea" (Liberty). Third week. 
Not enjoying capacity audiences. Ex- 
cellent newspaper notices, but show 
hasn't the draw shown on its Lon- 
don engagement. 

"The 'Mind the Paint* Girl" (Billie 
Burke, Lyceum), doing a fine business, 
running between $9,000 and $10,000. 
• "My Beat Girl" (Clifton Crawford, 
Park). Probably doing about $7,000 a 
week. Popularity of star helping 
greatly. 

"Ready Money" (Elliott). Fine, 
steady business, but not capacity. City 
so full of hits and each succeeding one 
exciting new interest, this show, open- 
ing early, is suffering where it might 
not under other conditions. Now play- 
ing to around $8,000. 

"The Attack" (John Mason, Gar- 
rick). Frost. Mason is being praised 
fulsomely, but .he play won't do. 



w 



'The Count of Luxembourg" (New 
Amsterdam). One of the latest hit6, 
doing between $18,000 and $20,000. 

"The Girl from Brighton" (Acad- 
emy). Coming off in a few weeks, for 
the road. Had a bad start, but picked 
up with the addition of the-. Cabaret 
scene. Must play to $7,000 to break 
even, and probably doing more, which 
would be close to capacity in a small 
theatre and look like nothing at the 
Academy, now William Fox's home of 
musical comedy stock. 

"The Governor'a Lady" (Republic). 
Capacity is about $11,000. Drawing 
all the theatre can hold. 

"The Master of the House" (39th 
Street). Has held its own against ad- 
verse criticism. Playing to between 
$5,000 and $6,000. Doing well enough 
to satisfy management, which is build- 
ing up what is believed will be a good 
piece of road property. Moves to the 
Lyric, a larger house, next Monday. 
"The Brute" opens in the 39th Street 
Tuesday. 

"The Merry Countess" (Casino). Will 
probably stay all season. New playing 
to between $16,000 and $17,000, the Ca- 
sino's capacity. 

"The Ne'er Do Well" (Lyric), Com- 
ing off. Did a little business on pop- 
ularity of book, but receipts have gone 
all to pieces. 

"The Passing Show" (Winter Gar- 
den). Not a sell-out, but business very 
big. About $18,000 for the six week- 
days, with from $2,500 to $3,000 for the 
Sunday concert, making total close to 
$21,000. A hit held over from the sum- 
mer. 

"A Perplexed Huaband" (John Drew) 
(Empire). Best Drew business in sev- 
eral seasons. Drawing upstairs houses 
for the first time in years, with big 
Saturdays, which run near $3,500 on the 
two performances. Doing about $10,- 
000 weekly. 

"Oh! Oh! Delphine" (Knickerbocker). 
Opened Monday night. Went very 
big, received splendid notices. Times 
said: "Another 'Pink Lady,' but scar- 
let." Large demand for seats, and as- 
sured success. 

"The Case of Becky" (Frances Starr) 
(Belasco). Opened Tuesday. Engage- 
ment for three months. Good start se- 
cured. 

■ "Steve" (Arnold Daly) (Harris) 
opened last Saturday night. Will close 
this Saturday. Good speculation that 
failed to pan out. Notices ruined all 
chances of business. $^00 in the first 
ni^ht. 

"Henry V" (Lewis Waller, Daly's). 
Heavy play. Well received. Big busi- 
ness doubtful. Opened Monday. 

"A Scrape o* the Pen" (Weber's). 
Fair advance sale. Show received ex- 
cellent notices, and is generally well 
liked, but doesn't look strong enough 
to draw downtown. Playing to Scotch- 



men principally. Believed that further 
uptown it might have proven another 
"Bunty." 

"Under Many Flags" (Hippodrome). 
Between $25,000 and $30,000, with par- 
ticularly large matinees, on several oc- 
casions requiring the services of police 
to preserve order. 

"Within the Law" (Eltinge). Prac- 
tically capacity at every performance, 
which totals around $11,000 on the 
week. Held $1,785 one Saturday night, 
over capacity by a considerable amount. 

"Little Miss Brown" (48th Street). 
Starting off about as "Over Night" did, 
.reported growing steadily and will re- 
main indefinitely. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The season may be said to be fairly 
well on in Chicago now that every 
"loop" house is running. Weather con- 
ditions have been peculiar. The sum- 
mer was cool and the theatres open 
did good business. With the regular 
season a hot wave swooped down, 
knocking business into a cocked hat. 
Just now there seems to be a tendency 
to hold back a little. 

There are some good attractions in 
town, but business has not been satis- 
factory except in one or two instances. 

"The Garden of Allah" (Auditorium). 
Playing at $1.50, top prices. Doing the 
business of the town. Receipts have 
reached $3,300 on the day. Show bill- 
ed all over the country, and drawing 
as "Ben Hur" did. 

"Milestones" (Plackstone). Play of 
novel construction. Has been mildly 
successful. Indications are it may pick 
up. 

"Girl from Montmarte" (Chicago Op- 
era House). Opened Sunday. "Tantal- 
izing Tommy" left for New York. 

"A Polish Wedding" (Cohan's Grand 
Opera House). Clean but quiet little 
comedy with music. Small houses. 
Piece lacks the vim and verve usually 
associated with a Cohan production. 
Will give place to "The Red Widow" 
Oct. 6. 

"A Winaome Widow" (Colonial). 
Typical Ziegfeld show. Has not cut 
the swath expected. Sold out but one 
performance during engagement. Book- 
ed in for seven weeks, with option on 
four more. Will not use the option. 

"Fine Feathers" (Cort). First big hit 
of the season. Has been doing good 
business. First two weeks not an 
empty seat. Hot weather cut receipts 
down a little, but they have picked up 
and the show will remain four weeks 
longer, with a possible extension. 

"The Bird of Paradise" (Garrick). 
Has done well at matinees, night busi- 
ness disappointing. Closed with a nice 
run of business. Margaret Anglin 
opened* in "Egypt" Tuesday with a 
small advance sale. 

"Kiamet" (Illinois). One of the hits. 
Doing healthful business. 

"The Girl at the Gate" (La Salle 
Opera House). Business picking up 
and statements show good condition. 
Some changes have been made in the 
opening scenes. The piece has caught 
the usual La Salle gait and promises 
to have a long run. 

"Blue Bird" (Lyric). Opened Mon- 
day with flattering advance sale. 

"Get Rich Quick Wallingford" (Mc- 
Vicker's). Opened Sunday night. Dol- 
lar prices. 



"The Man Higher Up" (Olympic). 
Good play of modern times, doing just 
a fair business. Receipts not big but 
encouraging. Manager Lederer doing 
good publicity work. News bulletin in 
front of theatre attracting much atten- 
tion. 

"The New Sin" (Powers). Highly 
praised by the reviewers but not well 
attended by the public. Receipts have 
been picking up a little, and will prob- 
ably grow with engagement. Show 
pleases the studious. 

"A Modern Eve" (Princess). Musical 
show. Has passed 200th performance. 
Fair to successful business. Cast prac- 
tically new with exception of William 
Norris and Georgie Drew Mendum. 

Boston, Oct. 2. 

No complaint can .be registered 
against Boston by the theatrical pro- 
moters so far this season. The good 
shows have been getting the money. 
Just now the record stands about as 
follows for current attractions: 

"Quaker Girl" (Colonial). Doing a 
big business, at least $12,000 weekly. 
Showing strength to warrant assertion 
it will be here for three months longer. 

"Robin Hood" (Boston). Opened 
Monday. Followed "The Greyhound" 
which remained four weeks, not taking 
over $10,000 gross on the entire visit 
from reports. Boston passed up the 
show. 

"Woman Haters' Club" (Tremont). 
Doing $11,000 each of its two weeks 
here. Pity to move the show. Leaves 
Saturday night. "A Polish Wedding" 
comes in the Tremont Monday, brought 
on from Chicago. 

"Maggie Pepper" (Rose Stahl) 
(Park). Doing practically capacity in 
rather small house. Upstairs sell out 
regularly. Downstairs big, probably 
$9,000 weekly. Here for ten weeks. 

"Butterfly on the Wheel" (Shubert). 
Third week. Doing nicely, nothing big. 
Between $5,000 and $6,000 week. 

"June Bride" (Majestic). Second 
week. Has started nothing. Any esti- 
mate of gross would be light. 

"The Talker" (Hollis Street). Open- 
ed Monday. May Robson's move from 
Park to Hollis Street brought no re- 
turns. 



»4< 



SEARCHLIGHT" IS POLITICAL. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. 

"The Searchlight," a newspaper play 
by Walter Fox Allen and Marvin A. 
Riley, opened at the Walnut, Monday 
night, marking the 105th season of 
this playhouse. 

The story is a political one, told in 
naive, simple straightforward fashion, 
with a human interest strain which 
strikes a sympathetic chord. 

It is not as good a play as "The 
Man of the Hour," but has a plot that 
is*cntertaining. The authors are news- 
papermen and much of the atmosphere 
of the trade runs through the play. 

It was well received by a large au- 
dience Monday night. 

"The Wall Street Girl," with Blanche 
Ring featured, opened to a crowded 
house at the Lyric. The piece was 
very well liked, Miss Ring winning 
warm favor by her magnetic person- 
ality and Will Rogers coming in for a 
liberal share of the laurels. "The Wall 
Street Girl" looks like a welcome 
visitor for a couple of weeks. 



12 



VARIETY 



OH 



BBBBHBSHBB 



CHICAGO FINE ARTS THEATRE 
DEDICAT ED BY H IGH SOCIETY 

Windytown's Best People Take Up the ,"New Theatre" 
Idea, After New York's Failure. House Well Sup- 
ported In Financial and Social Ranks* 



Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The Fine Arts theatre, formerly the 
Music Hall in the Studebaker theatre 
building, was dedicated Monday night 
with Wolf-Ferari's operette, "The Se- 
cret ot Suzanne," sung by members of 
the Chicago Grand Opera Co. Alice 
Zeppeli was the star. The operette 
was given last winter at the Auditori- 
um, where it created mild interest. 

The theatre has been handsomely 
fitted up. It will be used for offerings 
of varied style during the winter. Mrs. 
Harold McCormick is the honorary 
president of the Chicago Theatre Co., 
operating the little playhouse. Ira 
Nelson Morris is president; Kenneth 
Goodman, vice-president; Arthur Bis- 
sell, secretary, and Hamlin Garland, 
corresponding secretary. 

It is the aim of the organization to 
offer new plays, and work along the 
lines of the New theatre, formerly in 
New York. 



GLENMORB DAVIS WORKING. 

The local press department of the 
A. H. Woods office is in charge of 
Glenmore Davis. Jake Rosenthal is 
in Boston with Woods* "Woman 
Haters' Club," which opens at the 
Astor Oct 7. 

Mr. Davis will have charge of pub- 
licity for "Within the Law" at the 
Eltinge, and "Tantalizing Tommy" at 
the Criterion, two more of the Woods 
string now in the city. 

Jake is going ahead of "Gypsy Love" 
on the big city time, and is happy 
over the prospect. He returned to 
New York Sunday for a day. Mon- 
day the bijou lift in the Eltinge build- 
ing made special trips for Mr. Rosen- 
thal. 



LONGEST WOMAN'S ROLB. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 2. 
"Mrs. Hennaberry's Christmas Eve," 
a comedy in three acts by Laurence 
Eyre, a Philadelphian, is to be the first 
of the season's attraction at the Little 
Theatre, scheduled to open in Novem- 
ber. Arnold Daly owns the rights to 
produce the play and has been en- 
gaged to personally direct it. "Sweet 
Will Shakespeare," also by Eyre, will 
be produced later with Daly in the title 

role. 

Mrs. Beulah E. Jay, director of the 
Little Theatre has secured Florine Ar- 
nold to play "Mrs. Hennaberry," one* of 
the longest character roles ever written 
for a woman. Hilda Englund, Louise 
Muldener, Gilda Varesi and Nellie Fil- 
more have been engaged. 



CORT MEAN'S BUSINESS. 

Boston, Oct. 2. 
There's no doubt John Cort meant 
business when he announced a new 
Cort theatre for Boston. An order 
for steel for the construction has been 
placed. Mr. Cort was in Boston last 
week with Architect Houghton, of Se- 



attle. He designed the Moore the- 
atre, Seattle. 

The local site is in Park Square, the 
most central and fast coming part of 
the city. It is about one-half block 
from Boylston street. The house, 
when completed, will seat around 1,- 
500. It is expected to open early in 
the new year. 



"MY BEST GIRL'S" NEW PEOPLE. 

Maud Raymond and Frances Dema- 
rest are new to the cast of "My Bes: 
Girl" at the Park. They step intoj 
the roles in the musical comedy Har- 
riet Burt and Olive Ulrich created. 



*TWASN*T NO WAY TO DO. 

San Francisco, Oct 2. 

Thor Raje has been granted a di- 
vorce from Enez Raje, known to the 
light opera stage as Inez Francisco. 

The allegations specified flirtations 
by the wife. Raje declared that while 
he was in the house teaching music 
his wife was on the porch holding an* 
other man's hand. 



LIERLER'S "LANAGAN" RIGHT& 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

Liebler & Co. have brought the dra- 
matic rights to the "Lanagan" stories 
by Edward H. Hurlbut, now running 
in Collier's. 

Hurlbut is a San Francisco news- 
paper man. 



FORBES SHOWING NEW PLAY. 

Atlantic City, Oct 2. 

A new play by James Forbes opens 
at the Apollo Monday night, remain- 
ing three days. 

It is "A Rich Man's Son," a comedy 
drama. The cast includes: Paul Ever- 
ton, Jessie Ralph, Ralph J. Morgan, 
Gideon Burton, John Cumberland, 
Mary Morgan, Walter Allen, Fania 
Marinoff, Jos. Reider, Jane Corcoran, 
and others. 



LONDONERS IN TOWN. 

Ernest D'Auben, stage director of 
the Drury Lane, London, and Herbert 
Magher, electrical engineer from the 
same playhouse, arrived in New York 
Wednesday on the Carmania. 

At midnight Wednesday the men 
started the work of getting the Man- 
hattan stage ready for the forthcoming 
Comstock & Gest production of the 
big spectacle, "The Whip." 



MANNERS AND STANLEY DIFFER. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 2. 
Differences are reported here be- 
tween J. Hartley Manners, playwright, 
and Forrest Stanley, leading man of 
the Burbank, over the alleged partial 
eclipse of the halo with which Lau- 
retta Taylor had been invested. 

The warm reception accorded Stanley 
in Barbarasea is generally bcl'cvcd to 
be primarily responsible ior whatever 
difficulties may exist. 



CLARA LIPMAN'S SHOW OFF. 

Rehearsals have been called off for 
the forthcoming production by Werba 
& Luescher of Clara Lipman and Sam- 
uel Shiftman's comedy drama, "It all 
Depends on the Woman." 

Miss Lipman was to have been per- 
sonally starred, but so many argu- 
ments arose over the selection of the 
cast and the manner of the manage- 
ment's conduct of rehearsals, the au- 
thors took their manuscript and de- 
parted, leaving no alternative for 
Werba & Luescher but to dismiss the 
company. 



DRAMA LEAGUE APPROVES. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The Drama League, that austere 
Evanston body that sits in judgment 
on things theatrical in Chicago, has 
given its endorsement to "The New 
Sin," "The Bird of Paradise," "Kis- 
met" and "Milestones." 

This means the members will plug 
hard for the success of the four at- 
tractions. 



SEVERAL EXTRA STAGE CREWS. 

Last week after General Organizer 
Hugh Frayne had decided as an arbi- 
trator that the Shuberts would have 
to add an extra stage crew in the El- 
liott and 39th Street theatres, the I. A. 
T. S. E. discovered there were other 
shows in New York that came under 
Mr. Frayne's decision. 

The arbitrator's opinion was that all 
pieces produced before August 5 were 
obliged to carry a crew, giving the 
theatre playing it house and show 
crews, though but one set of stage 
hands would have been sufficient 

The enforcement of the ruling 
against the other New York houses is 
said to have placed the Shuberts and 
Klaw & Erlanger on a platform of 
sympathetic regret that may lead to 
some future understanding between 
them relative to the matter of the 
theatrical unions. 



RITCHIE IN BERNARD SHOW. 

Monday the Sam Bernard show 
commenced to rehearse in the hall 
which is a part of the office suite of 
A. H. Woods, in the Eltinge theatre 
building. Adele Ritchie has been en- 
gaged and was among the principals. 

Woods is in partnership with the 
Shuberts on the Bernard piece, "All 
for the Ladies." The selection of 
principals and chorus and the build- 
ing of tlje show seem to have been 
left to Woods. 

Besides this partnership the Shu- 
berts and Woods are jointly concerned 
in "Within the Law," at the Eltinge. 
The Shuberts have 25 per cent, of the 
piece, Woods 25 and the American 
Play Company 50 per cent. 

The close association of the Shu- 
berts and Woods in the two produc- 
tions has led to reports of late that 
once again drew in the name of Co- 
han & Harris. Investigation failed to 
reveal any more basis for the rumors 
than has existed for the past six 
months. 



CURIOSITY ADVERTISING. 

Boston, Oct. 2. 
Gertrude Hoffmann's show, coming 
to the Shubert next week, is being ad- 
vertised "bringing the night life of 
Paris to the very doors of Puritan 
Boston." 



LEASE FRISCO'S AMERICAN. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 
The American has been sub-leased 
for a year by Ed. Armstrong, owner 
and manager of the Armstrong Musi- 
cal Comedy Co. The house opens* 
Oct. 20 with musical comedy at popu- 
lar prices. 



HAS AUDITORIUM RECORD. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 
"The Garden of Allah" at the Audi- 
torium has broken the month record 
for standard play receipts in Chicago. 
Since Sept. 1, and for the four weeks 
ending Saturday, the total receipts havo 
been $99,545.75, an average of nearly 
$25,000 per week. This is the record 
for the house. 



258-POUND ACTOR. 

Countess Olga Hatzfield has been 
assigned one of the principal roles 
with "The Dingbats" which went in- 
to rehearsal Monday. 

Bobby Wagoner, aged 20 years, 
weighing 258 pounds, joined this week 
for the fat boy's part. "The Ding- 
bats" opens Oct. 28 at Paterson. 



'•JUNE BRIDE" BULLT UP. 

Boston, Oct. 2. 

"The June Bride" has been bolster- 
ed up considerably since the opening 
night. A Russian ballet has been put 
into the first act and some new danc- 
ing numbers in the second. The third 
act was the best of the three and the 
first two have been built up to it. 

Lew Fields spent the greater part of 
last week here, looking after the piece. 



MAY BE ER. LAWSHE. 

A report was around that Er. Law- 
she will succeed to the position of 
general press representative for Klaw 
& Erlanger, vacant through the sud- 
den death of John Murray. 



MUSICAL VERSION OF "NEXT." 

"The Girl and the Miner" is rehears- 
ing, preparatory to a road tour that 
is to start October 14 at Albany. 

The piece is said to be a musical 
version of "Next," presented last seas- 
on at Daly's. The Shuberts are mak- 
ing the production. 



O. U. STILL AT IT. 

O. U. Bean is planning to send out 
"An Aztec Romance" under a new 
name, with new people, for a trip 
through the New England States. He 
expects to get the show started soon 
after election. 



"LITTLE WOMEN" ROAD CO. 

The road company of "Little Wo- 
men" opens October 14, at Cleveland, 
after a short test of one nighters the 
week before. Julia Varney, one of 
the original players in the Alcott piece, 
will be with this company, as also will 
be Edna Walther, the child actress. 

On the same day the Cleveland com- 
pany starts, the New York premiere 
will take place at William A. Brady's 
Playhouse, supplanting "Bought and 
Paid For." 



VARIETY 



13 



MAY APPROVE SUNDAY SHOWS 
UNDER NEWEST CLUB PLAN 

William A. Brady's Playhouse To Give Performance Sun- 
day October 20, "For Members Only." First Series 
of Regular Sunday Legitimate Shows. 



William A. Brady's prospectus for 
the new Playhouse Sunday Club is 
now being distributed. It calls for an 
initiation fee of $10, with regular 
weekly dues. 

The first production under the new 
order of things takes place October 20. 
The piece selected is Jules Eckert 
Goodman's "The Point of View/' with 
a cast which includes Emily Stevens, 
Lucille Watson, Madge Kennedy, 
Grace Griswold, May M alloy, William 
Morris, Howard Estabrook, George 
Pauncefort. 

This plan of Mr. Brady's now bids 
fair to develop into a universal propo- 
sition. It has been so organized to 
avoid any reasonable possibility of 
conflict with the Sabbath observance 
laws. Heretofore all attempts to give 
regular legitimate performances in the 
metropolis have been squelched before 
they matured. 



"OUTSIDERS" IN JANUARY. 

The Authors' Producing Co. is get- 
ting under way for the production of 
Charles Klein's new play, "The Out- 
siders," which has had much of it re- 
written by the author. 

"The Outsiders" was given a trial 
production last season by "The Gamb- 
ler" Company, at Boston. As a result 
Klein withdrew it and started to doc- 
tor up the piece. It will be produced 
some time in January. 



44 



NE'ER DO WELL'* GOING OUT. 

"The Ne'er Do Well" is leaving the 
Lyric this Saturday, bound for the road 
stands on the Shubert time. In its 
place Monday next will be "The Master 
of the House," removed from the 39th 
Street theatre. At the latter house of 
amusement, opening Tuesday, is to 
come "The Brute," dramatized from the 
novel, and produced under the manage- 
ment of Comstock & Gest. "The 
Brute" was tried out in stock this sum 
mer by the firm, at Cleveland. 

The removal of "The Master of ihe 
house" to a larger theatre is proof of 
the Shuberts belief in the piece, al- 
though that it goes next door to the 
Republic, where David Belasco's "The 
Governor's Lady" is installed for a long 
run, may be significant in a way. There 
are said to be points of similarity be- 
tween the two pieces. 

Concise information relative to the 
author of "The Master of the House," 
Edgar James, was furnished this week 
by Julius Steger, who started off Mon- 
day in vaudeville at Atlantic City in 
"Justice." Mr. Steger says only Mr. 
James wrote the play, and that he re- 
sides in Boston, is a graduate of the 
Harvard dramatic class, besides having 
written many well-known bodks. Mr. 
Steger was moved to rise in protest 
over a story that Charles T. Dazey had 



been responsible for "The Master." As 
a matter of fact most people along 
Broadway held a suspicion Mr. Steger 
himself more closely resembled the real 
writer, notwithstanding the Harvard 
man having been programically 
credited. 

"The Brute" will give its first per- 
formance to-night (Friday) at Yonk- 
ers. 



TWO OF GAITES' AT HAND. 

"A Man's Way" is the title of Thomp- 
son Buchanan's new piece which Jos. 
M. Gaites has accepted for production 
around Nov. 15. Several seasons ago 
Buchanan wrote "A Woman's Way" 
in which Grace George appeared. 

Gaites' production of "Our Wives," 
with J. Henry Kolker and Janet Beech- 
er as its principal players, now in re- 
hearsal, will have its road premiere next 
week. This show may have its first 
long engagement in Boston. 

Before the Buchanan play is pro- 
duced its present title may be changed. 



"POLISH" NAME NOT LIKED. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

It is said tne title of Cohan & Harris' 
"The Polish Wedding" show will be 
changed. It doesn't suit the managers. 

In connection with the piece is told 
how Stephen L. Kolanowski, editor of 
the Daily Polish Herald, was invited to 
a rehearsal Tuesday morning, Sept. 10, 
and asked to express his views on what 
should be eliminated as contrary to the 
Polish customs. 

When the editor had entered all his 
objections, he was told the rehearsal 
was over. None of his suggestions was 
followed, for he objected to nearly 
everything in the play. Kolanowski had 
criticised the performance in the Tri- 
bune on its premiere. 



LONDON PROGRESSIVE HERB. 

New York has one of the most pro- 
gressive of the theatrical progressives 
in Maurice Elvey, stage director of 
"Fanny's First Play" at the Comedy, 
and American representative for Gran- 
ville Barker. 

Mr. Elvey, in his home town, Lon- 
don, is a prominent figure in the Adel- 
phi Society, a congregation of literary 
lights over there who like to see the 
pieces that cannot pass the Play Censor. 
These have been produced at the Little 
and Rehearsal theatres in London, usu- 
ally put on by Mr. Elvey. He is cal- 
culating the chances for forming a simi- 
lar society to the Adelphi over here, and 
may look about for a Broadway house 
without Sunday night engagements to 
present the stage realism things in New 
York during the season, before a select 
few. 



BULGER ENDS LONG TOUR. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 
Harry Bulger closed "The Flirting 
Princess" in Grand Rapids this week,, 
after playing fifty-eight consecutive 
weeks through the middle west and 
west. The show, one of Mort Singer's, 
will go to the storehouse. It wilf 
be seen in stock next season. 



"VIRTUE*' PIECE SHOWN. 

Montreal, Oct. 2. 

Cosmo Hamilton's "Blindness of 
Virtue" received its premiere in Amer- 
ica Monday, before a large sympathe- 
tic, but not critical, audience. 

The thesis of the play is that girls 
are led astray through ignorance. 

Curtain calls were frequent and at 
the finale the author made a speech. 

The Star says it is "a sermon in 
Marionettes." 



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WEBER CIRCUIT CHANGES. 

"The Wrong Way" by Owen Da- 
vis, formerly presented under the title 
of "Drifting," under Dave J. Kraus' 
direction, started its way over the* 
Weber "pop" circuit at the Gayety* 
Hoboken, Monday. The show is head- 
ed by Thurlow A. White and George 
Drouet Hart. Next week the Gayety 
reverts to stock. 

"The Fatal Wedding" is to be re- 
vived for the Weber pop time by Dave 
Marion, the Eastern Burlesque man- 
ager. Rehearsals commenced Tuesday. 

George Jacobs, who controls the 
Columbia, Newark, has notified the 
Weber circuit managers his theatre 
leaves the chain Oct. 12. The further 
policy of the Columbia has not been 
announced. "A Parisian Model" is 
the attraction in Newark this week. 
None of the circuit shows has done 
anything worth mentioning since the 
opening. 

"The Prosecutor," a piece put out 
by the Mittenthals for the Weber 
time, closed after an engagement at 
the Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, 
last week. 

The Mittenthals will also withdraw 
"The Melting Pot." They expect to 
produce two other shows to replace it 
and "The Prosecutor" on the wheel. 
New ones may come after election. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 
The Alhambra closed Saturday nighc 
after three weeks of b«d business. The 
house opened on the Weber pop cir- 
cuit It is now dark. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

"Redhead," one of the attractions 
playing the Weber Circuit, dropped off 
that time last week in St. Louis after 
a week at the La Salle theatre there. 
The gross weekly receipts were $1,- 
314.15. 

The show was booked to play Kan- 
sas City following the St. Louis date. 
"The Woman in the Case" was jumped 
from Toledo to Kansas City to sub- 
stitute. 

Louis Stern, who owns "Redhead," 
is booking the troupe over the one- 
nighters from Kansas City. 

Montreal, Oct. 2. 
The engagement here last week of 
Edna May Spooner in "The Price She 
Paid" was the last for the Royal the- 
atre as a spoke in the Weber-pop Cir- 
cuit. Poor business forced the house 
out of the wheel. 



Isabell DArmond and Frank Carter who were such a riotous success at the Victoria 
Palace. London, that Mr. Alfred Butt Immediately signed th»m for the Palace. Shaftesbury 
Avenue. The Managers have generally offered D'Armond and Carter time extending two 
rears ahead. 



HAVAGB IS HOME. 

Henry W. Savage returned Tues- 
day to New York from London, where 
he saw "Everywoman" successfully 
launched. Savage brought back several 
new plays and immediately made ar- 
rangements for the production of 
Rupert Hughes' new comedy, "Well, 
Well, Well," which has been renamed. 
The Hughes piece will be brought out 
in November. Another company of 
Excuse Me" and the "Boy Blue" shows 
started their road tours this week. 
With Savage's return will come the 
launching of the American company of 
"Everywoman" which commenced re- 
hearsals this week. 

Chris Pender, English character 
comedian, has returned from London. 



14 



VARIETY 



FOR SIGNALS FLYING 

(Continued from page 10.) 
change and between acts took oc- 
casion to say so. The first night crowd 
in New York has been going later and 
later to the theatre, some of its mem- 
bers arriving as far along as a quarter 
to nine, when the show was in full, 
swing, and disturbing whole rows of 
early spectators. It required some 
nerve on the part of Klaw & Erlanger 
to throw down the gage to these peo- 
ple, many of whom apparently cherish 
the idea that first nights are run for 
their benefit exclusively. 
They Won't Make Up. 

I hear it stated upon what seems to 
be the very best of authority that there 
is no chance of a reconciliation be- 
tween Fritzi Scheff and her husband. 
John Fox's relatives — some of them 
that is to say — live in Chicago, and. 
they recently made a strong effort to 
patch up the differences between the 
opera star and her lord. 

Miss Scheff for a time was a guest 
of mutual friends in Lake Forest, just 
outside Chicago, and all sorts of pres- 
sure was brought to bear upon both 
husband and wife to mend their shat- 
tered conjugality. It is declared byf 
those in a position to understand the 
situation that Mr. and Mrs. Fox are 
further apart than ever. 
Fox Will Run Stock. 

There has been some curiosity as to 
what William Fox would do with the 
theatre which he is to build next door 
to his Riverside house in upper Broad- 
way. As is quite well known, Mr. Fox 
bought the plot upon which this resort 
is to be erected, with the sole idea of 
protecting himself against intimate op- 
position. 

The new theatre will have a seating 
capacity of 2,500, and it comes out that 
a big stock company will occupy it 
under the Fox management. Down in 
Fourteenth street Mr. Fox appears to 
have solved the problem of competing 
with himself in several theatres that 
draw from the same patronage, and it 
looks very much as though he intended 
to carry his plan uptown with him. 
New Lederer Piece. 

George W. Lederer is at work upon 
the details of a new musical comedy to 
carry the general form of "Madame 
Sherry," although not resembling that 
work in story or action. The piece) 
will be produced before the end of the 
year, and Mr. Lederer regards its 
chances with the utmost optimism. 

"These are the things tlpat get the 
money," said the manager yesterday. 
"Neither in cost or production nor run- 
ning expense do they involve anything 
like the big musical undertakings, 
while on the reverse, when they are 
successful they draw just as big re- 
ceipts, and the promoter gets the same 
percentages as though he employed a 
company of 100 and carried two or 
three car loads of scenery and cos- 
tumes. Another point is that the pro- 
ducer can stand a failure or two in this 
branch without going to the wall — 
which is worth considering." 

The profits of "Madame Sherry" still 
run on. The company which played in 
Detroit last week cleared the neat lit- 
tle sum of $1,800, while Cincinnati 
showed net earnings of nearly $500, 
and Abbeyvflle, Spartansburg and sim- 
ilar centres known only to Jules Mur- 



ray and Mr. Lederer's official path- 
finder, cleaned up $940. 
Marcus Maytr'a Patents. 

Since Marcus Mayer retired from the 
amusement business, he has been de- 
voting his time and energies to the 
exploitation of various patents, one of 
which is a new type casting device 
that almost got there, but didn't. Mr. 
Mayer now has two inventions in hand 
which probably will be floated in Eu- 
rope. 

One of these is a meter that meas- 
ures gas, electricity and taxicab service 
upon a basis that gives the consumer 
a chance for his life, and the other is 
an electrical attachment that turns cold 
water into hot water in considerably 
less than no time. 

The companies that produce gas au<i 
electricity do not view Mr. Mayer with 
the. extremest favor nowadays, and the 
chauffeurs regard him with a fixed and 
vindictive scowl, but he is quite cheer- 
ful under the circumstances. 
Some Random Notes. 

Amusements in Chicago are rather 
tough again following a streak of hot 
weather that occurred some time ago 
and has not been recovered from. 
There needs to be some big, rousing 
success to awaken the Illinois metrop- 
olis from its lethargy. 

Victor Hollaender, the German com- 
poser of light opera, sailed yesterday 
from this port with Berlin as his point 
of ultimate destination. 

Robert Hilliard's tour in his new 
play, "The Argyle Case," is to open in 
Atlantic City Oct. 16. The drama looks 
well in its present state of preparation. 

Alice Brady has been recalled from 
the Gilbert and Sullivan all-star com- 
pany to resume her original role of 
Meg, in "Little Women," in which she 
made a pronounced hit last spring. 

Sallie Fisher and Walter Lawrence 
probably will be the ones to score most 
heavily upon the first New York pro- 
duction of "The Woman Hater's Club," 
now imminent at the Astor theatre. 
This piece has created a veritable sen- 
sation in its preliminary season away 

from ' Broadway^ 

*~t » 

In "The Brute," Frederic Arnold 
Kummer's new drama made from his 
own novel of the same name, youny 
Ernest Glendinning plays a serious 
part with a bf^. and savage scene as its 
climax. This^ actor has been associ- 
ated principally with comedy roles, but 
is said to have developed conspicuous 
force in the new play. 

Stuart Acheson, dramatic editor oil 
the American, has returned to his desk 
after a period of nervous breakdown, 
which M 'confined him for several weeks 
to a private sanitarium. 

Richardson. 



"JIM BLUNT" WITHDRAWN. 

Tim Murphy closes shop in "Honest 
Jim BJunjf" " at . Wallack's tomorrow 
night! • Alfr attraction will be booked 
in by rajptfer producing firm with the 
Lieblef% "ptarrtifssion. 

The last act of the "Blunt" show 
may be rewritten and Murphy sent out 
in the piece later. 



"HOME PLATE** FORCED OUT. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 2. 

"The Home Plate" suddenly ter- 
minated Saturday night at the Lyceum 
Theatre on account of the agreement 
with Morosco in the Orpheum lease 
prohibiting stock there. The house is 
dark this week, with nothing billed 
ahead. 

Ferris' negotiations for the lease are 
still pending with the Orpheum, ami 
the Fischer Co. is reported willing to 
transfer if owners can be persuaded* 
to agree. 

The play will most likely go to Chi- 
cago soon, if it is possible to get time 



"STEVE" IS THROUGH. 

"Steve" gets through to-morrow 
night at the Harris. Arnold Daly, the 
star of the piece, has agreed to again 
appear in vaudeville, and, will play 
Hammerstein's Oct. 14 in "A Comedy 
for Wives." 

No one is hurt much by the failure. 
Arthur Hopkins undertook the man- 
agement of the piece for New York. 
The company other than Mr. Daly 
was inexpensive comparatively, and 
consisted of six people, the highest 
salary being $125 weekly. The parlor 
set used for the three acts at the Har- 
ris cost $800 to build. 

When the show opened in Boston 
it is said to have had a set that cost 
considerably less. H. H. Frazee, then 
manager, sold an interest in "Steve" 
("The Wedding Journey") to Arthur 
Klein for $2,500. Mr. Klein turned 
over $1,000 in cash. According to the 
experts, that was enough to get every- 
body out even up to that time. The 
show remained a week in Boston. 



ALIENATION SUITS STARTED. 
Fitchburg, Mass., Oct. 2. 

Dexter W. Fellows, press agent for 
the Barnum and Bailey circus, was 
sued last week for $25,000 by J. Al- 
bert Sodestrom, a local druggist, who 
charges Fellows with the alienation of 
Mrs. Soderstrom's affections. 

Fitchburg is Fellow's home city. The 
suit set the town wild with gossip. 
Fellows is out of the city at present. 

Mrs. Soderstrom was Signe Von 
Breitholtz, the daughter of a Swedish 
nobleman. She was the belle of Wor- 
cester society before her marriage. 
Fellow's family is very prominent. 
His brother, John B. Fellows, is a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts legislature 
and another brother is a member of 
the police department 

Mrs. Soderstrom denies the allega- 
tions of her husband and says that 
when she left him some months ago it 
was with the understanding that she 
was to secure a divorce. She stamps 
the action of her husband as slander- 
ous. 



SHOWS CLOSING. 

"The Other Man," Eugene Prcs- 
brey's play, in which George Nash has 
been featured since its recent pre- 
miere, has no further time booked 
after its Washington engagement. 

The show has not come up to ex- 
pectations. Cohan & Harris will 
shelve it for the present. 

Another road show, "The Yankee 
Prince," with Tom Lewis featured, 
* financed by Charles and Joseph F. 
Vion, came to a sudden stop at Al- 
toona last Friday night. The play re- 
verts to Cphan & Harris, who had let 
it on royalty. 



Louis J. Winsch, former husband of 
Dorothy Regal, has started an action 
in the Supreme Court against John J. 
Collins for alienation of affections. 
Miss Regal recently obtained a divorce 
from Winsch in Chicago. Sept. 19, 
she married Mr. Collins at Stamford, 
Conn. 

A day or two after the announce- 
ment of the marriage of Miss Regal 
to Collins, Winsch appeared in town 
iind declared that he knew oi" no d.- 
> tree. His counsel, Bennett E. Sicgcl- 
stein, now says in addition to tlid 
alienation suit, he wil bring an action 
in Chicago to set aside the divorce. 



TWO MORE HITS. 

Two more hits were placed on top 
of New York's already long list, when 
"Oh, Oh, Delphine" started Monday 
at the Knickerbocker, and "The 
Case of Becky" opened Tuesday at 
the Belasco. 

Others may be charged up to the 
success column for the week, from the 
two Metropolitan openings Wednes- 
day night. 

At the premiere of "Delphine," no 
one was ushered to an orchestra seat 
after 8.10. About 200 belated patrons 
were caught, and obliged to stand in 
the rear during the first act. 

"Becky," with Frances Starr, is an- 
nounced to remain twelve weeks, a 
new Belasco production taking the' 
stage of the Belasco theatre Dec. 25. 

"Henry V," presented by Lewis 
Wallers Monday night at Daly's, is 
not listed among the theatrical sen- 
sations. 



SAN FRANCISCO SHOWS. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

Maclyn Arbuckle, after an absence 
from the local legitimate stage of two 
years, returned to the Columbia Mon- 
day in a revival of "The Round Up." 
Arbuckle, rather than the vehicle in 
which he stars, was accorded a dem- 
onstrative welcome. 

The American premiere of "Conchi- 
ta" received a remarkable ovation Sun- 
day night at the Cort. A packed house 
greeted the Lambardi Co. in "Madame 
Butterfly" Monday night. The critics 
unanimously praised the work of the 
prima donna, Tarquini. Yesterday 
she received a wire from Andreas Dip- 
pel asking her to accept an engage- 
ment for January and February. 

The opening of stock for the fifth 
week at the Savoy was marked with 
a continuance of good houses. 

"Mother,"" presented by the Alcazar 
stock, headed by Sarah Truax and 
Thurlow Bergen, made a good impres- 
sion. Lola Fisher debutted as ingenue 
and pleased. 



ENGAGES BEATRICE MORGAN. 

Beatrice Morgan has been engaged 
by David Belasco for his next produc 
tion, in December. 



UTICA'S NEW THEATRE. 

Utica, N. Y., Oct. 2. 
The theatre being built here by a 
Dr. Pender will he in readiness to 
open January 1. No policy has been 
announced. 



VARIETY 



15 




STOCK 




JOHN CURLEY TAKEN ILL. 

John Curley, who has been acting 
thirty years, last with the Phillips' Ly- 
ceum stock, Brooklyn, suffered severe 
hemorrhages of the lungs last Fri- 
day. Curley's condition was brought 

to the attention of the Actors' Fund 
by Paul Scott. Inside of an hour the 
society had a doctor and a nurse at 
Curley's bedside. 

Curley's condition is critical. As 
soon as able, he will be removed to 
a sanitarium. Curley nursed his wife 
for nine years, the latter dying about 
six months ago. 



THE PITTSFIELD COMPANY. 

Pittsfield, Mass., Oct. 2. 

Harold Franklin, of the Franklin- 
Baggott Co., which launches winter 
stock at the Empire next Monday, - 
came from New York this week and 
started rehearsals for the opening bill 
of "The Fortune Hunter." 

In addition to Victor Brown and 
Phyllis Rankin, leads the company in- 
cludes Harry Hockey, Joseph Creag-i 
han, David Walters, Oline BlaRely, 
Everett Murray, Ann Hollinger. 



DOWN IN SAVANNAH. 

Savannah, Oct. 2. 
Tedd Brackett and his Associated 
Plays have announced a winter en- 
gagement at the Liberty. A full com- 
pany was recruited through the Betts- 
Fowler agency, New York. 



SEATTLE HOUSE IN STOCK. 

Seattle, Oct. 2. 

Seattle has been without a stock 
company for some seasons past but a 
new home company will be installed 
at the Seattle Oct. 13 by Messrs. Bai- 
ley & Mitchell. Popular prices will 
prevail. 

The Seattle, John Cort's theatre, has 
been playing traveling combinations. 



MISS PHILLIPS MOVES. 

Minna Phillips, leading woman with 
Corse Payton for six years, has re- 
placed Adra Ainsworth as leading 
woman at the Greenpoint stock the- 
atre. 



MORTIMER SNOW LEADS. 

Lynn, Mass., Oct. 2. 
Mortimer Snow is now leading man 
of the Lindsay Morrison stock com- 
pany. 



COLLEGE REOPENING. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The College will reopen with a stock 
company under the management of 
T. C. Gleason, Oct 7. 

The following have been engaged: 
Edward Haas Robbins, Edith Lylc, 
Martha Bouchier, Camille D'Arcy. 
Thomas F. Swift, Harry Manners. 



ALTERNATE LEAD. 

Boston, Oct. J. 
Wilson Melrose, at the Castle Square 
next week, will alternate in the leads 
with John Craig. 



HARLEM O. H. STOCK 

The B. F. Keith Harlem Opera House 
stock is still running but is not doing 
the business it would were the prices 
10-20-30. After looking the present 
combination over one will readily ad- 
mit the house has something of a nerve 
in charging prices that hit the dollar 
mark for box seats at an evening per- 
formance. 

Last week the company put on "Alias 
Jimmy Valentine." Three men had to 
carry the show through. They were 
George Soule Spencer as Valentine, 
Gerald Harcourt as Red, his pal, and 
Thomas Mills who played Doyle, the 
detective. This trio interpreted their 
roles cleverly and effectively and were 
the props that held up the performance. 

Warda Howard, playing Miss Lane, 
the woman who stands responsible for 
Jimmy leaving prison, fills the stage but 
not the role, which is more suited to an 
ingenue lead and not to an actress of 
the Howard type. 

The Harlem company could have put 
this show over with telling effect had 
it been rightly casted. A few dollars 
judiciously placed with a regular dra- 
matic agent for "specials" during the 
big productions would work wonders 
up Harlem way. 

Thursday night, the house was only 
partly filled downstairs with the fifty 
cents seats in the back the most popu- 
lar. The gallery and balcony had a big- 
ger crowd. Something is wrong. The 
company opened several weeks ago, 
but no one received applause as he or 
she first appeared. 

Stock is not a new venture in Har- 
lem but without considerable patching 
and perhaps a "name," the present H. 
O. H. Company will not turn the trick. 

Mark. 



BACKER GETS ENOUGH. 

Ottawa, Can., Oct. 2. 

The Colonial theatre stock closes 
Oct. 5. A society woman who has 
been backing the company decided: 
she has had enough for the present. 
Last year the company under her di- 
rection ran twenty-eight weeks. 

Edna Archer Crawford has been fea- 
tured with the local company which 
presented a new play without any 
name this wek. 



GIVE UP IN JOISfiY. 

West Hoboken, N. J., Oct. 2. 
Raymond Whittaker and his stock 
company, playing the New Amsterdam 
here, have given up. Poor business. 



FOR THE FAR WEST. 

"A Gentleman Of The City," a new 
play by Percy Sargent, will be pro- 
duced through the far west by Sar- 
gent's own company, headed by Con- 
nors and Kearny. 



REPAIRING "CASEY JONES." 

Dayton, O., Oct. 4. 
Arthur Gillespie, the New York 
writer, came on here to repair "Casey 
Jones," the Rowland & Clifford show 
on the Stair & Havlin time. 



NEW VICTORIA OPENS. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The Victoria opened Sunday after- 
noon, in "Don't Lie to Your Wife," 
a farce with music by Campbell B. 
Casad. The lobby was filled with scaf- 
folding and there were many other 
evidences of the unfinished condition 
of the house. 

The theatre is roomy and modern. 
The decorative scheme is gray and 
gold. The steel curtain carries a west- 
ern scene. The curtain is in black; 
and gold with Japanese designs. 
On the mezzanine floor there is a 
promenade, and a rest room with a 
soda fountain and other features that 
make it unique. 



AMERICAN GETS AWAY BIG. 

Chicago, Oct. 2. 

The American Music Hall opened 
Saturday night to a big and enthusias- 
tic crowd, with "The Military Girl" 
which has been current at the Ziegfeld 
theatre. It was received with much 
warmth. 

The piece has had a hard struggle, 
but there are indications that it will 
now gain prosperity. 

Sam P. Gerson, manager of the 
American, did some strenuous work 
placing the house in shape, and also in 
keeping the company together for the 
venture. 

New features will be added to the 
show from time to time in the way of 
burlesques on attractions in town. 

Cecil Lean and Florence Holbrook 
are featured in the offering. 



FIRST ATTRACTION BOOKED. 

San Francisco, Oct. 2. 

Kolb and Dill will be the first occu- 
pants of the new Grauman theatre on 
Market, near Seventh street. They 
close the engagement at the Savoy in 
three weeks, then spending a fortnight 
on the road, returning for the dedica- 
tion of the new house, remaining two 
weeks there. 

While no definite announcement has 
been made, it is generally understood 
musical comedy stock will be the pol- 
icy of the theatre. 




JOHN MURRAY DEAD. 

John ("Jack") Murray, general 
press representative for Klaw & Er- 
langer, died Monday morning at 2 
o'clock, in a hospital, where he had 
been removed after an automobile had 
struck him. A fractured rib pene- 
trated his lungs. Mr. Murray was 
conscious until the end. He left in- 
structions for his funeral services and 
selected the pall-bearers. 

In perfect health, he attended a din- 
ner at the Hotel Astor Saturday night. 
Leaving there he started across Broad- 
way, when a machine unseen by him 
swiftly coming down the street, hit 
him. 

Very popular in the theatrical dis- 
trict, Mr. Murray's death was genu- 
inely mourned. He had been a news- 
paper man ever since graduating from 
Princeton. Before taking the position 
with K. & E. Murray had been out 
with "Wildfire" for Frederic Thomp- 
son. Mr. Thompson was influential in 
securing Mr. Murray the K. & E, 
berth. 



OBITUARY 

Boston, Oct 2. 
Peter H. O'Neil, Jr., known as 
"Happy" O'Neil, the minstrel man, 
died Friday, at the home of his par- 
ents, 153 Princeton street, East Bos- 
ton. He gave up a career as a lawyer 
after he graduated from the Boston 
University Law School, to take up 
stage work. Later he went into the 
music publishing business with Oliver 
E. Story. He was the son of Peter 
H. O'Neil, superintendent of the con- 
struction of bridges for the city of 
Boston. 

Pittsburgh, Oct. 2. 
Robert S. Clements, widely known 
in the theatrical business, died in the 
Punxsutawney Hospital here. He was 
born in Brookville, Pa., 52 years ago. 
After his retirement from the circus 
field he was manager of the American 
House, Pittsburgh, and treasurer of 
the Trocadero, Chicago. 

Henry Willie Blair, father of Harry 
J. Blair and Jane Blair Curtis (Curtis 
Trio) died Sept. 26 at Schenectady, 
N Y. 

George Turner, an English actor in 
the fifties, who was rehearsing a small 
part in a forthcoming New York pro- 
duction, died suddenly in bed at his 
apartments in Stapleton, S. I., last 
Sunday. He left a widow and children 
in straitened circumstances. 



Hazel Morrison, a professional for 
many years, died at her home, 232 E. 
26th street, New York City, Sept. 16, 
after a lingering illness. She is sur- 
vived by a step-sister, whose stage 
name is May Fisher. 



Viola Jerome, in private life Mrs. 
Thomas Walsh (Jerome and Morrison) 
died in Brooklyn last week while under- 
going an operation. 



P. W. MILKS 

(Officer McNabb) 

with Kr«Ml Ircland'B "Cunlno Girls" 

Ulrfction, UEEHLKK BROS. 



Mrs. Anna Ford, mother of Joie 
Canada, playing in the Ktnpirr Stock- 
Co. Crand Rapids died recently in Dc 
troit. 



16 



VARIETY 



■9BM9BI 



am 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, Flrat Appaarnnra 
or Reappearance In or Aronnd 
New York # 

Billic Reeves, Fifth Ave. 

Blake and Amber (Reappearance), 

Fifth Ave. 
Gladys Vance, Fifth Ave. 
Jim Diamond and Sibyl Brennan, 

Colonial. 
McMahon, Dyment and Clemmons, 

Bronx. 
Peppino, Union Sq. 
Hal Davis and Co. (New Act), Ham- 

merstein's. 
Frank A. Mullane, Hammerstein's. 
Close Brothers, Hammerstein's. 

lulu Glaser with Thos. D. Richards 

and Co. (1). 
"First Love" (Musical Comedy). 
24 Mins.; Interior (Special Set). 
Orpheum. 

Lulu Glaser bows to vaudeville in a 
typical musical comedy vehicle. It has 
the Plot, the Soldier-Tenor, the En- 
genue and the doting, but grumpy, 
Ola Uncle. Young couple without 
knowing each other are betrothed. She, 
tc get a true line on husband-to-be, 
disguises as a maid. Right here would 
have been the place to write in a Lulu 
G.aser laugh, if that were possible, and 
ycu know the rest. Just to make it 
a story the maid gets over with the 
young man a mile. She returns to her 
original self and accuses the tenor! 
of being a flirt. He begs forgiveness 
and she falls into his arms. For 
Lulu Glaser (the first time) it is for 
vaudeville. There is plenty of oppor- 
tunity for her laugh*ter and the time 
limit is just right. In a maid's black 
dress, the comedienne did not look well 
but in a pretty pink frock Miss Glaser 
appeared as youthful as ever. The gay 
laugh didn't seem to be quite as gay 
a- of yore, but this may have been 
cue to a slight cold. Thomas D. Rich- 
ards played the soldier-tenor as though 
accustomed to it and gave the picture 
plenty of color in his gay uniform of 
red and gold. He also sang a number 
cr two as tenors always sing them. 
Lester Browne, the uncle, filled in the 
minor role. Mr. Browne is also pro- 
gramed as producer. Raymond W. 
Peck and Melville Alexander wrote the 
book and lyrics. M. S. Bentham is 
mentioned as directing the piece in 
vaudeville. No musical director is ear- 
ned. The Orpheum audience accepted 
the piece in a dignified manner, evinc- 
ing their liking for the star without 
any great demonstration. Dusf^ 



Perea Sextet. 

Instrumental. 

20 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Columbia (Sept. 29). 

The Perea Sextet (from Portugal) 
is a string musical organization, carry- 
ing also a piano and organ. There are 
three violins, a cello and bass viol. The 
music is concerted throughout, which 
makes it somewhat fatiguing, and might 
be varied with a violin or cello solo, 
one or more. The airs run from class- 
ical to popular. The program, with an 
exception or so, would not be com- 
plained of were the solos in it. As a 
musical number, the Perea Sextet will 
be welcomed in houses attracting high 
ar^de patrons — in the majority. 



Taylor Oranville, Laura Pierpont and 
Co. 

"The System" (Dramatic). 

32 Mint.; Poll Stage, One and Close 
Full 8tage (Special Sets and Drop). 

Union Square. 

"The System" secui9 to be a business 
gttter. At 8 o'clock Monday evening 
the Union Square box office rack was 
bare except for the boxes. There was 
a good deal of Monday night paper in 
the $1 sections, but even at that the 
boxes were sadly vacant. The police 
expose sketch, written, the program 
s;ys, by Taylor Granville in collabor- 
ation with Junie McCree and Edward 
Clark, is a story of twisted ethics and 
sadly distorted morals, making an ap- 
peal to the morbid interest that used 
Isj keep a crowd around the collection 
cf death masks and like exhibits in 
Huber's Museum. It's a pity the 
writers selected such nasty subjects, for 
the tale is most skillfully told and the 
dialog discloses a gift of literary ex- 
piession on the part of some of the 
three which is worthy of better things. 
Fourteenth street audiences may not 
rxd anything offensive in the portrayal 
of such characters as a woman of the 
streets and a crook who takes it for 
granted she will pay his fare to Chi- 
cs go, but it is to be doubted that gen- 
erally audiences will enjoy such a stage 
p'cture. Arnold Daly once played in 
"The Regeneration" and found this 
out. These intimate pictures of the 
Fcurteenth street sidewalk phase of 
the underworld do "advanced vaude- 
ville" no good. Of course, the pres- 
ent police mess in New York forms 
the groundwork of the sketch, and its 
application to current news may ex- 
plain its drawing power. The police 
' system" in the person of one Dugan, 
a Central Office detective, frames up 
a job on Billy Bradley, alias "the Eel" 
(Taylor Granville), in order to railroad 
him and win his girl, Goldie Marshall 
(Laura Pierpont). "The Eel" outwits 
the detective and at the final curtain 
stands purged of all his misdeeds, in 
possession of large wads of money 
(stolen from the grafting detective) 
ard headed for Chicago and a delight- 
fully comfortable reformation with 
Goldie, the girl of nameless trade. Now, 
honestly, isn't that out of order? In 
the telling of this story the authors 
have put several "punches" worthy of 
O Henry, and the curtain falls on a 
bully surprise. The sketch as it stood 
Monday night was too long. The en- 
tire second scene might be eliminated. 
It does not advance the story in the 
slightest, is discursive and is only in- 
teresting as a bit of "atmosphere." The 
discussion of newspaper ethics, besides, 
is a side issue. What Mr. Granville 
wants to discuss, if we understand 
l:is purpose, is "The System" and the 
messy love affairs of the crook. 

Rush. 



Adams and Terrell. 
I nstrumentalista. 
15 mins.; Two. 

Male "comedy" instrumentalists, good 
for the small time. The main comedy 
bit is the "straight" handing the "com- 
edian" a cornet to play, and on blowing 
into it, flour is projected into his face. 
Act could — and probably does — work 
in "one." Joh. 



afra. Langtry and Co. (3). 

"Helping the Causa" (Comedy). 

22 Mins.; Full Stage Interior. 

Colonial. 

Mrs. Langtry in "Helping the Cause" 
has a very good comedy sketch for 
London, but for New York it serves 
for twenty-two minutes to allow the 
audience to see the star. Mrs. Lang- 
try's success will only be judged by 
the number of people attracted to the 
box office. Tuesday night the ground 
floor and boxes were practically filled 
with the balcony and gallery about 
three-quarters occupied. This is bare- 
ly making good for Mrs. Langtry. The 
theme of her present sketch, to the 
average New Yorker, is foreign. The 
militant suffragette we don't know, so 
much of the satire is wasted. In Lon- 
don, where these progressive little 
women do anything from incendiarism 
to caving in the dome of a Prime Min- 
ister, the piece was funny. Here it 
means nothing except the by-play of 
the two men. With the satirical side 
lost, it becomes merely a farce and 
not a good one at that for America. 
Mrs. Langtry is sixty-three years old 
according to report. She's a wonder, 
and didn't even begin to look old along- 
side the Doctor who appeared about 
twenty-two. The company is compe- 
tent. It is simply a question of draw- 
ing power with Mrs. Langtry, and it 
isn't likely she can maintain the even 
break of the early week's business at 
the Colonial. v<*9h. 



Ruse Whytal and Co. (3). 

"Lui" (Dramatic). 

20 Mine.; Five (Parlor). 

Fifth Avenue. 

"Lui" as an episodical adaptation 
from the French is useless to vaude- 
ville. It broadly dilates upon a disa- 
greeable phase of life's undercurrents. 
There may be a place for this sort of 
stage realism — there should be in New 
York, tfut not in vaudeville. Legiti- 
mate players debuting in the varieties 
may as well shy away from the dra- 
matic sketch that at least is not whole- 
some in its lesson. "Lui" ("He") tells 
a story unfit for publication. Granted 
Mr. Whytal's character bit was we\\ 
done, that the revolver shots Monday 
evening became confused, and that 
Sarah Biala in the principal support 
gave one of the best performances 
ever seen in a tabloid, "Lui" has 
not a chance in any vaudeville 
house — unless the manager is aim- 
ing to have the receipts that may be 
drawn by the piece go toward the pur- 
chase of a padlock for his doors. 

Sitne. 



Stuyvesant and King Sisters. 

Singing. 

14 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Grand Opera House (Sept 29). 

Three women get away nicely with a 
quiet simple turn. The King Sisters 
are slim and youthful looking, while 
Miss Stuyvesant is of the plump, mat- 
ronly type. The combination gives her 
opportunity to play up to the others for 
comedy effect. They finish with a very 
pretty trio number, quietly and simply 
handled. Their easy, smooth methods 
and excellent singing gets t ncm away 
to a substantial success. Rush, 



NEW SHOWS NEXT WEEK 

iBttlal Paaaaatatlon •! Letftttamate 

Attracttoae la Naw York 

Tkaatras. 

•The Brute"— 39th~Street (Oct. 8). 
"The Daughter Of Heaven"— Century 

(Oct. 12). 
4 The Woman Haters' Club"— Astor 

(Oct. 7). 



Jock McKay. 

Musical Monolog. 

19 Mins.; One. 

Fifth Avenue. 

When Jock McKay first appeared in 
New York, the week of Dec. 27, 1908. 
at the Colonial, the New Act review 
(unsigned) of him in Variety (Jan. 2, 
1909) said, in part: "It's all up to Mr. 
McKay. He can make or break him- 
self as he may choose his style of 
work." Nearly three years since then. 
Mr. McKay is reappearing this week in 
New York, at the Fifth Avenue — and 
he is made. For a foreigner who has 
picked up the American idea of vaude- 
ville and shaped a turn accordingly, 
Jock McKay is cheerfully recommended 
as the model. Jock is a kidder. He best 
describes himself by remarking while 
on the stage (in a likeable and under- 
standable Scotch dialect): "You didn't 
think so much of me when I came on, 
did you? I knew that. When I am gone, 
you will say 'Wasn't that Scotchman 
clever? What did he do?'" But Mr. 
McKay does things nevertheless. He 
tells stories, plays ragtime on the bag- 
pipes and kids. Among his jokes were 
a couple of old boys. Jock knew that, 
so he said after telling one: "You have 
heard it before, but it's the way I put 
them over." That's so. Mr. McKay 
also highly ruminates on "curtains" or 
"bows." Speaking confidently to the 
audience, Mr. McKay told those in front 
how actors like to take bows, which 
they can only do when the audience 
applauds. "When I was at the Tivoli. 
London, this summer," said the bright 
Scotch comedian, "they made me take 
four bows, like this (illustrating by 
rapidly jumping in and out of the first 
entrance and smirking). Now I am 
going to play the bagpipes walking up 
and down the stage" he added. "The 
last time, when I get to here (marking 
off a point on the stage) I will turn 
my head to you sideways like this 
(turning) and you will know I am off. 
Then you commence to applaud and we 
will see if we can't beat that record." 
Monday night Mr. McKay did break 
that record, each time he left the stage. 
His rag on the pipes is the first played 
on this side. "Alexander's Band" was 
the air. It is probably very diffi- 
cult. Another solo, "I Love a Lassie." 
was also played by him, instead of the 
inveterate Scotch tune usually turned 
out by bagpipe manipulators. Jock ex- 
plains why the Scotch favor the pipes 
"It makes the Scotchman brave in war." 
he said. "They would rather be killed 
than hear it." Jock McKay is a dandy 
little vaudeville comedy number. Placed 
next to closing at the Fifth Avenue, he 
made the hit of a somewhat ragged pro 
gram that had preceded him, and whicli 
did not help his chances in the late spot 
He has that invaluable gift of simulated 
impromptu delivery, he looks funny. 
and he is funny, Swt, 



VARIETY 



If 



Frank Bryon and Louise Langdon and 

Co. (9). 
"Coyotte Gussie" (Comedy). 
35 Mine.; Full Stage (Special Drops). 
Fifth Avenue. 

Bryon and Langdon's new act has 
plenty of comedy, made through the 
contrasted effects of a big bluff west- 
erner with a gun, and Mr. Bryon's "Cis- 
sy" character. Eight nicely dressed and 
good looking chorus girls provide a 
lively background to three numbers, the 
most catchy being "Girl of the Golden 
West." Dressed in brown the young 
women of the chorus had appearance 
in the changes of costume. The story 
is of a cissified youth who goes west, 
lands on a ranch, riles the cowboy, nar- 
rowly escapes death at his hands sev- 
eral times, to finally discover the rough 
gunman is his father, from Trenton, 
N. J. As "Coyotte Gussie," Mr. Lang- 
don got laughs as easily as when Bryon 
and Langdon did their "Dude Detect- 
ive." The Fifth Avenue audience 
proved the couple were remembered by 
a reception upon their appearance. Miss 
Langdon has not a great deal to do, 
even with dialog, although her em- 
phatic "Dan!" often repeated to restrain 
the cowboy from killing the "cissy" 
was made very emphatic and explosive 
every time. Miss Langdon also looks 
well in her western habit. "Coyotte 
Gussie" might have stood another 
week's workout in the woods before 
coming into New York. In that time 
doubtless the "baby business" would 
have been taken out. Something is 
needed to fill in the time now taken 
by it, although perhaps the act could 
be cut down that much. The "baby" 
matter is hardly worth while, and less- 
ens the comedy importance of the 
character Mr. Bryon always handles 
so well. Bryon and Langdon will 
work this number into a recognized 
comedy turn, although a defect at pres- 
ent is that the westerner is not brusque 
nor bullish enough. He should be a 
very, very bad man, for his opposite 
(Mr. Bryon) is the limit of a legiti- 
mate "nance." Sime. 



Mr. and Mrs. A. Bascomb. 
The Awakening of Mr. Pipp" 

(Comedy). 
14 Mine.; Pull Stage. (Bedroom.) 
Winter Garden (Sept. 29). 

The title of the sketch played by Mr. 
and Mrs. Bascomb at the Winter Gar- 
den Sunday evening was neither pro- 
gramed nor carded. However it was 
"The Awakening of Mr. Pipp," or at 
least an English version of the comedy 
playlet Charles Grapewin played in 
vaudeville over here. Mr. Bascomb put 
on this same piece at the Tivoli, Lon- 
don, some weeks ago, as reported at 
the time by cable to Variety. The 
Sunday evening performance was but 
a. diversion for the players at the Gar- 
den. Mr. Bascomb is the principal 
comedian in "The Merry Countess" at 
the Casino, where his success has been 
so pronounced there is small chance he 
will become available for vaudeville 
anywhere for a long while. In the 
"Pipp" affair, he secured many laughs, 
and was well assisted by Mrs. Bascomb, 
a brunet of a decided English type, 
good looking, and with a wealth of hair 
that hung loose about her. The finale 
°f the sketch was said at the Garden 
hy those who saw it abroad to have 
been changed. The finish was quiet 

tnd »bmpt. Sime, 



Tom Nawn and Co. (2). 
"The College Coach" (Comedy). 
13 Mins.; Interior. 
Hammerstein's. 

Tom Nawn, one of the most artistic 
portrayers of the "tad" character in 
vaudeville, has a new vehicle, but one 
so thin he is compelled to resort to a 
few of his old-time soft-shoe steps. As 
terpsichoiean "convolutor" he can still 
give a few of the boys of this period a 
considerable handicap. "The College 
Coach" is a comedy skit built around 
an old melodramatic idea — that of turn- 
ing one's daughter out of the house be- 
cause she insisted on becoming an ac- 
tress. The girl returns and on learning 
from her mother that "the old man" is 
stubborn about taking her back, sug- 
gests she impersonate a dowager and 
try some of her "acting" on him. It is 
asking an audience to stretch its imagi- 
nation considerably to believe that a 
father would not recognize his own 
daughter disguised with a gray wig and 
dressed as an elderly woman. "The girl 
leaves her father's presence "unmasked" 
and returns a moment later as herself, 
begging her mother to take her home — 
that she is ill and the troupe stranded. 
Mother pretends to be cruel and bids 
the child "go;" whereupon the father 
rounds on mother and declares his child 
shall not be turned out of the house. 
The expression on Nawn's face when 
he, in the character of the father, dis- 
covers that he was tricked, is a con- 
summate bit of pantomimic art. The 
skit, however, is lacking in situations 
and the main argument against it being 
used as a vehicle for Nawn, is that he 
is merely a "feeder" for the daughter's 
part. All three characters were excel- 
lently interpreted. Jolo. 



Adelaide and Hughes. 
"Canoeing** (Dancing Pantomime). 
17 Mine.; Full Stage (Special Set-Wood- 
land). 
Winter Garden (Sept 29). 

"Canoeing" is Adelaide and Hughes' 
new act, first presented Sunday at the 
Winter Garden, where the principals 
are part of the weekly show. In "Can- 
oeing" there is a pretty glade setting, 
with Mr. Hughes sleeping on a log, 
while Miss Adelaide is seated upon a 
fence, at the opening. Following some 
pantomime by both, they dance, having 
one new style, a variation of the 
"no-clasp," followed by a sort of "Tan- 
go," with an exit in a canoe, far up- 
stage. The new act, with more of the 
couple's dancing would fit in nicely for 
vaudeville. It pleased the Winter Gar- 
den audience very much, and made a 
most pleasant number, not the least part 
of which was the appearance of Adel- 
aide. Dressed in a white outing suit, 
she could have been mistaken for Flora 
Parker. In the big improvement and 
advancement of Adelaide during the 
past few seasons, her looks have kept 
pace. Sime. 



Love and Height. 
Female Impersonators. 
10 Mins.; One. 

Two young men, one smaller than the 
other, essay female impersonations. The 
shorter chap appears first in soubrettish 
attire and specializing on ballet danc- 
ing The bigger fellow seems to have 
been paying close attention to Julian 
Eltinge. The boys should be able to 
get over in the pop houses. Hork- 



Vera Michelene. 

Songs. 

15 Mina; One. 

Colonial. 

Vera Michelena is from musical 
comedy. Featured in "Alma," she is 
using the "Alma" number as her open- 
ing song. It places her on an easy 
footing early. "Beautiful Dream" is 
the second selection. She makes it 
sound like a new number. Miss Mi- 
chelena has one of those soothing 
voices, and it's nice to hear a sooth- 
ing voice in a vaudeville theatre. A 
high class number is the third, al- 
though there are no vocal pyrotechnics 
nor vaudeville tricks utilized for ap- 
plause. The closing number is Ori- 
ental, with just a touch of rag. It 
makes a big finish. Dressing is an 
important item in Miss Michelena's 
offering. A purple gown is a wonder- 
ful creation and the singer can wear 
it. Two or three of those bewitchyig- 
ly attractive caps are also worn with 
the several costumes. The costume 
worn with the Oriental number is slit 
up the^aide and almost amounts to 
tightsr'<v£pening after intermission af- 
ter being moved from "No. 4" position 
(where she should have been, both for 
the good of the show and herself), 
Miss Michelena is a big time single 
of a type vaudeville needs at present. 
She fairly represents class, and class is 
becoming an asset in vaudeville that 
cannot be overlooked. Datih 



Tilford. 
Ventriloquist 

19 Mins.; Full Stage (Can Appear in 

one). 
Grand Opera House (Sept. 29). 

Tilford used a single grotesque 
dummy and requires as paraphernalia 
only a table, a telephone and a cigar. 
He smokes the cigar during a running 
fire of talk with his dummy and con- 
tinues to puff as he comes down into 
the audience. Even under the spot- 
light there is no perceptible movement 
of the lips. Tilford has by long odds 
the best singing voice noted in a ven- 
triloquist this long time. He employs 
it to good effect during the turn. He 
is in addition a person of excellent, 
easy stage presence. His talk is bright 
for the most part and won laughs from 
the Sunday afternoon audience at the 
Grand, where it was a substantial hit. 
He used a paroxysm of weeping by the 
dummy tellingly. Rush. 



Melville Ellis and Maurice Farkoa. 

Musicals. 

17 Mine.; One. 

Winter Garden (Sept. 29). 

To term Melville Ellis and Maurice 
Farkoa anything but a musicale num- 
ber, would be vaudevilly sacrilegious. 
Of all the classy numbers where the 
piano is combined with songs, vocally 
or recitative, Messrs. Ellis and Farkoa 
must take their place at the uppermost 
point. The number was impromptu for 
•the Garden's Sunday night show. Mr. 
Farkoa is playing in "The Merry 
Countess" at the Casino; Mr. Ellis lately 
returned to New York from "The Social 
Whirl." Could they continue as "an 
act" their value, if guaged by the class 
of the turn, in appearance, workman- 
ship and selections, would be measured 
only by the limit of the managerial 
pocketbook. Mr. Ellis first stepped 
upon the stage where his popularity 
may be best described as immense. 
Always a strong favorite at the Gar- 
den, applause preceded and followed his 
piano solo. Mr. Ellis again shone as 
accompanist to Mr. Farkoa, who de- 
livered "Two Dirty Little Hands" with 
an appreciable quantity of expression 
that is so often lacking in American 
male singers. His next was "I Like 
Love," a jerky little bit of a foreign 
lyric (probably) that he made much of. 
Another might have wasted it. "I Love 
a Lassie" was sung in French by Mr. 
Farkoa. The velvety language gave it 
another lilt from the broad and heavy 
Scotch of Harry Lauder (Mr. Farkoa 
mentioned Mr. Lauder in his announce- 
ment of the number). For the finale 
the singer sang "My Sumurun Girl," 
also in French, and was loudly encored, 
repeating the chorus. "Ellis and Farkoa 
in 'one' " looked «reat. 8ime K 



Ramsdell Trio. 

Dancing. 

12 Mine.; Full 8tage. 

Colonial. 

The Ramsdell Trio open the show at 
the Colonial this week and make about 
as good a number for the position as 
could be secured. It is a dancing act. 
but not of the usual sort. Two girls 
and a boy make up the trio. The danc- 
ing consists of solo. duo. and trio work 
of various kinds. The girls make a 
very good appearance, with two or 
three changes of costume, each pretty 
and becoming. The bny does toe work. 
not always accepted from a man. hut 
he is more like a kid and passes Tt 
is a pretty little act. with some class, 
for just the position it now occupies. 

path. 



Mae West. 

Songs. 

13 Mins.; One. 

Hammeratein'a 

Mae West is one of those girls you 
run into at a music publisher's, become 
interested in through watching her re- 
% hearse a new song, tip off your agent 
friend to "grab off" a "find," and feel 
that you have done both the girl and 
the agent a favor. Sometimes you even 
take a chance yourself and agree to 
"go good" for wardrobe, etc. Then you 
phone one or two "newspaper boys" 
and drag one of the booking managers 
over to a rehearsal. You communicate 
some of your enthusiasm to all with 
whom you come in contact and finally 
the woman'gets a week at either Ham- 
merstein's or the Fifth Avenue. Some- 
how or other tJk she doesn't project that 
remarkable "personality" across the 
footlights and you charge up a few 
hundreds to experience. Miss West 
was given a work-out at Hammerstein's 
a few months ago and "didn't have the 
material.'' To-day, profiting by that en- 
gagement, she is given a routine of good 
and new songs, a couple of travesty 
imitations, a little eccentric dance and 
she passes nicely. Her .new songs arc 
"Isn't She the Crazy Thing'" "It's an 
Awful Crazy Way to Make a Living. " 
"Good Night. Nurse." ' Fverybody'' 
Ragtime Crazy." Of the four "G«™d 
Night Nurse" is probably t lie best 

Job. 



VARIETY 






=5 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (October 7) 

la Vaudeville Theatres, Play Inrf Three or Less Shows Dolly 

(All house* open for the week with Monday matinee, when not otherwise indicated.) 
(Theatres listed as "Orpheum" without any further distinguishing description are on 
the Orpheum Circuit. Theatres with "S-C" following name (usually "Empress") are on the 
Sulllvan-Consldlne Circuit.) 

Agencies booking the houses are denoted by single name or initials, such as "Orph." 
Orpheum Circuit — "U. B. O.." United Booking Offices — "W. V. A.," Western Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Association (Chicago) — "8-C." Sulllvan-Consldlne Circuit — "P." Pantages Circuit — 
"Loew," Marcus Loew Circuit — "Inter," Interstate Circuit (booking through W. V. A.) — 
"Bern," Freeman Bernstein (New York) — "Clan," James Clancy (New York) — "M," James 
C Matthews (Chicago)— "Hod." Chss. E. Hodklne (Chicago) — "Tay." M. W. Taylor (Phil- 
adelphia) — "Fox," Ed. F. Kealey (William Fox Circuit) (New York) — "Craw." O. T. Crawford 
(St. Louis) — "Doy," Frank Q. Doyle (Chicago). 



' New York 

BRONX (ubo) 
"Trained Nurses" 
Ellnore ft Williams 
Felix Adler 
Tom Davies 3 
Dolan ft Lenharr 
Jessie Busley 
McMahon, Dyment ft 

Clemmons 
Lynch ft Zeller 
Belle Baker 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
Lulu O laser 
"Detective Keen" 
Cliff Gordon 
Woods ft Woods 3 
Cooper ft Robinson 
Macart ft Bradford 
Diamond ft Brennan 
Wllla Holt Wakefield 

ALHAMBRA (ubo) 
Clark ft Hamilton 
Arthur Deagon 
"Honor Among 

Thieves" 
Apollo Trio 
Avon Comedy 4 
Mayme Remington 

Picks 
Darrell ft Conway 
Sid Baxter Co 
Mrs Card Crane Co 

UNION SQ (ubo) 
Lillian Shaw 
Lou Anger 
Pepplno 

Cross ft Josephine 
Sophye Barnard 
Hill ft Silvtany 
Ergottl Lilliputians 
Chadwlck Trio 
Lambert! 

5TH AV (Ubo) 
Geo Beban Co 
Blllie Reeves 
Hart's 6 Steppers 
Jock McKay 
Blake ft Amber 
Frey Twins 
McDevlt Kelly ft Lucy 
Gladys Vance 
Carl Demarest 

HAMMBRSTEINS 

(ubo) 
Edna Goodrich Go 
Stuart Barnes 
"My Lady's Fan" 
Hal Davis Co 
Fay 2 Coleys Pay 
5 Sullys 
Puck ft Lewla 
Frank A Mullane 
Bell Boy Trio 
Adonis 

Close Brothers 
Brown ft Williams 
SEVENTH (loew) 
Lucy Tonge 
Jennings ft Bowman 
Herman Lieb Co 
Knight B ft Sawtelle 
Lansings 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Raymond, L ft Mono 
Herman Lleb Go 
Lew Brown Co 
Breakaway Barlows 

2 to fill 
YORKVILLE 
(loew) 
Grace Dixon 
McCarthy ft Mayor 
Frank Stafford Co 
Ward ft Smith 
3 Elliott Broe 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Kollins ft Klifton Sis 
Frank Stafford Co 
Lucy Tonge 
Zoeller Troupe 

NATIONAL (loew) 
Allan WIghtman 
Sbepperly Sisters 
Harry LeClair 
Sidney ft Townlcy 
"Arm of Law" 
Fiddler ft Shelton 
Yerxa ft Adele 

2d half 
Lambs' Manniklns 
Chas Irwin 
Edwin Keogh Co 
Marie Russell 
Van On Troupe 
(Two to fill) 

GREELEY (loew) 
Holmes ft Rellly 
Raymond. L ft Morse 
Frank fonks 
Edwin Keogh Co 
Louis Stone 
Romalne Cq 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Wllklns ft Wllklns 
Browns 

Jennings A. Bowman 
Harry Brown Co 



Pete La Belle Co 
(Three to fill) 

GRAND (loew) 
May Clinton Co 
Graham, Copes ft 

Kane „ 

"Night of Wedding* 
Les Copeland 
Blake's Circus 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Milano Duo 
Harry Satrlm 
"Double Cross" 
Madcap Dancers 
(Two to fill) 

AMERICAN (loew) 
Meyer Harris Co 
Teddy Dupont 
Original Madcaps 
Kollins ft Klifton Sis 
Al Herman 
Cycling Brunettes 
(Three to fill) 

2d half 
Miller ft Russell 
Blake's Circus 
Estelle Rose 
Roland Carter Co 
Louis Stone 
Fred Peters Co 
Al Herman 
Egawa 
(One to fill) 

PLAZA (loew) 
Carter ft Davis 
John T Doyle Co 
Breakaway Barlows 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Hap Hazard 
"Night of Wedding" 
Knight B ft Sawtelle 
King Bros 
(One to fill) 

LINCOLN (loew) 
Miller ft Russell 
Lew Brown Co 
"Futurity Winner" 
Joe Flynn 
Egawa 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Hunter's Dogs 
Holmes ft Rellly 
Josie ft W Barrows 
"Futurity Winner" 
Smith, Vokes ft Cro- 

nln 
Romaine ft Co 

DELANCEY (loew) 
Browns 

Josie ft Willie Barrows 
Morton ft Kramer 
Pete LaBelle Co 
(Three to fill) 
2d half 
Tossing Austins 
Ethel May 
John T Doyle Co 
Cycling Brunettes 
(Four to fill) 

Wronklvn 

BUSHWICK (ubo) 
"In Gray Dawn" 
Leo Carrlllo • 

Watson ft Santos 
Pealson & Goldle 
Chip ft Marble 
Hanlon Bros 
Edwards, R ft Tierney 
Grazers 
Odlva 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Hunt ft Simpson 
Ed F Reynard 
McMahon ft Chappelle 
Nichols Sisters 
Farber Girls 
Tornadoes 
"In the Barracks" 
(One to fill) 

JONES (loew) 
Moore ft Young 
Caulfield ft Driver 
Cadleux 

2d half 
Fred Elliott 
"L R Cabaret Girls' ' 
(One to fill) 

LIBERTY (loew) 
Harrv Thriller 
"L R Cabaret Olrta" 
Teddy Osborne's Pets 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
Hall ft Clark 
M Samuels Co 
(Three to fill > 

COLUMBIA (loew) 
Tlob Ferns 
"Double Cross" 
ft Merry Youngsters 
King Bros 
(Two -to All) 

2d half 
Graham. Copes ft Kane 
"City Editor" 
Lawrence ft Edwards 
Ihirrv Thriller 
(Two to All) 



8HUBERT (loew) 
Gilmore. Kinky A Oil 
Lambs' Manniklns 
Chas Irwin 
"All Girls" 
Marie Russell 
Van On Troupe 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
A!lan WIghtman 
Shepperly Sisters 
Harry Le Clair 
SJoney ft Townley 

• Arm of Law" 
Fiddler ft Shelton 
Yerxa ft Adele 

BIJOU (loew) 
Tossing Austins 
Ethel May 
"Mayor ft Manicure 
Smith, Volks ft Cro- 

nin 
Zoeller Troupe 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
Meyer Harris Co 
Morton ft Kramer 
"All Girls" 
Lansings 
(Three to All) 

FULTON (loew) 
Statue Dogs 
Estelle Rose 
Wllklns ft Wllklns 
Harry Brown Co 

• Pinafore" 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Daniels ft Jackson 
Gi'more. Kinky ft Gil 
McCarthy ft Mayor 
Joe Flynn 
•Pli'ffore" 
(One to All) 

\lton. 111. 

HIPPODROME 

(wva) 

Moore. Gard ft Tinker 

Roberts Rats ft Cats 

2d half 
(Two to AIT) 
Foster-Meeker 
(One to All) 

Aaa Arbor, Mica. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
Hill Cher ft Hill 
H Beresford Co 
Ball ft West 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
Moore's Rah Rahs 
Carter ft Blvford 
Mr ft Mr* Allison 
Fielding ft Carlos 
Bud Williamson 

flaltlaaore 

MARYLAND (ubo) 
"Opening Night" 
C ft F Van 
Rube Dickenson 
Baby Helen 
Beherne 

Harvey ft De Vora 
Beyer ft Bro 
(One to All) 

Battle Creek. Mica. 

BIJOU (wva) 
(Sun Mat Ooen) 
Dan Staerian Co 
Neater ft Pahlberg 
Crouch Rlclsrds Co 
DeMarest A Doll 
(One to All) 
2d half 
Broncho Busters 
Emille Egamor 
B Johnson ft Conway 
•De Velde ft Zelda 
Oskomon 

Bay City, Mlea. 

BIJOU (wva) 
(8un Mat Open) 
Adams ft Guhl Co 

Bllllasm. Meat. 

ACME (sc) 

(Oct ft- 10) 
Martlnek ft Doll 
bale ft Boyle 
Hyman Adler 
Grace Leonard 
Paul Spadonl 

Boatoa 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Genaro ft Bailey 
Ma-Belle Ballet 
Providence Players 
Marshall Montgomery 
Bert Melrose 
Five Msrtells 
(Two to All) 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Florence Bowes 
Geo Kane Bro 
"High Life Jail" 
Bourhton ft Turner 
Murry Livingston Co 
Will J Sweeney 
(Two to AH) 



2d half 
Miller ft Mack 
Al H Wild 
"High Life Jail" 
Bandy ft Fields 
"Gent With Jimmy" 
Will J Sweeney 
(Two to All) 

Broektoa. Men. 

CITY (loew) 
Love ft Halght 
Hong Pong 
Toomer ft Hewlns 

2d half 
Lawton 

Anderson ft Golnea 
Murry Livingston Co 

Baffalo 

SHEA'S (ubo) 
"Puss In Boot*" 
Don 

Tlgbe ft Clifford 
Currelli ft Gillette 
(Two to All) 

(FAMILY (loew) 
Robin 

Jean Baldwin 
Bill J. "Crook" 
Harry Sauber 
3 Bennett Sisters 

ACADEMY (loew) 
Valals Bros 
Kitty Faye 
Pearl Trio 
Leo Beere 
Terry ft Schultz 
Earl Jerome 
Powers Elephants 
Arnold ft Reynolds 
Wm Smith 
Imperial Trio 

Barte. Mont 

. EMPRESS (sc) 
Geo E Garden 
Van ft Car Avery 
Ccth Challoner Co 
"Beaus ft Belles" 
3 Spa Bros 

Calvary, Caa. 

SHERMAN GRAND 
(Orph Oct 10-12) 

"California" 

J J Morton 

Nonette 

Sohlichtl's Manikins 

Sidney Ayres Co 

Astaires 

Aitkin Whitman 3 
EMPIRE (p) 

(Opens Thursday Mat) 

Arlington Four 

Howard's Bears 

Al Carlton 

Mab Fonda Troupe 

(One to All) 

Cedar Rapids 

MAJESTIC (wva) 

7 Bel fords 

Tom . Glllen 

Barry Halvere Co 

W S Harvey Co 

Marimba Band 

Hoey ft Mozar 
2d half 

Inter Polo Team 

Dugan ft Raymond 

Fisher ft Green 

Barbee Hill Co 

Kramer, Belle ft Her- 
mann 

Champaign 
ORPHEUM (wva) 
Marx Brothers 
2d half 
Ern ft Mil Potts 
Charlotte Ravenscroft 
Flanagan ft Edwards 
Roberts Rats ft Cats 

rrateasre 

MAJESTIC (orph) 
Henry E Dlxey 
Galloway ft Kaufman 

Co 
Edna Aug 
Whiting ft Burek 
"Night Turkish Bath" 
Felix ft Barry Girls 
Ethel Mae Burke 
Leitzel Sisters 
Apdale's Animals 

PALACE (orph) 
Rock ft Fulton 
Nina Morris Co 
Leonard ft Russell 
Julius Tannen 
Gordon Highlanders 
Barnea ft Crawford 
Elida MorrlH 
Muriel ft Frances 
Valletta's Leonards 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun. Mat.) 
Headar* 
"That Kid" 
"Fun In Cabaret" 
Fox ft Ward 
Musical Luuda 



JULIAN (m) 
Marie Nelson-Rodney 

Ranous Co 
Nichols Nelson Troupe 
Musical Wheeler 
Coogan ft Parke 
Mary Dorr 

2d halt 
Nelson-Ranous "- 
Baffin's Monkeys 
Johnson ft Mercer 
Jack Hawkins 
Johnson ft Mercer 

LINDEN (m) 
Baffin's Monkeys 
Prince ft Deerle 
Frank ft Nellie Elli- 
son 
Klilian ft Moore 
Will ft Kemp 

2d half 
"Halloween Hop" 
Musical Wheeler 
Ted Bailey's Dogs 
Francis Murphy 
Frank ft Kate Carlton 
Cincinnati 
EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Mozarts 
Bimbos 

"Quaker Girl" 
John Neff 
"Circum Evidence" 
(One to fill) 

ORPHEUM (m) 
"Surf Bathers" 
Harmonious Girls 
Shaw ft Wilson 
Del Baity & Dog 
Llbonatl 

Mareena ft Delton 
L H (Rose Co 

Davenport 
AMERICAN (m) 
5 Greens 

Weston Raymond Co 
Keith ft Law 
Carl Herbert 
McDonald ft Gener- 
eaux 



ORPHEUM 
W C Fields 
Mrs G Hughes Co 
Chaa Case 
Bradshaw Bros 
"Squaring Accounts" 
Grover ft Richards 
Rexos 

EMPRESS 8(c) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Sombreros 
Curry ft Riley 
Leona Guerney 
Sullivan ft Bartling 
Will Rogers 
"La Petite Gosse" 
Dm Moines 
ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 
May Tully Co 
Ida Fuller Co 
Venlta Gould 
Robt De Mont 8 
Roxy La Rocca 
Kelly & Laferty 
Flying Weavers 
Dubuque, la. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
Inter Polo Team 
Dugan ft Raymond 
Fisher ft Green 
Barbee Hill Co 
Kramer, Belle ft Her- 
mann 

2d half 
Thos Q Seabrook 
7 Belfords 
Barry, Halves Co 
W 8 Harvey Co 
Marimba Band 
Hoey ft Mazar 

Dwlata 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Mrs Louis James Co 
Wilson Bros 
Car McCullough 
Herbert's Dogs 
Reded ft Currier 
Flying Martins 
Great Llbbey 

Kdmonlon. Caa. 
ORPHEUM 
(Oct 14-16) 
Same bill a« at Sher- 
man Grand, Calgary 
this Issue. 

Kvanavllle 
NEW GRAND (wva) 
Ern ft Mil Potts 
Dolllver ft Roger* 
Snyder ft Buckley 
Foster Mcokcr 
Ansonia 3 

2d half 
Kawana Bros 
Rruce Morg ft Betty 
Mr ft Mr* Connolly 
Lewis ft Dunn 
Baal LaVllle 3 
Pall River 
PREMIER 
Miller ft Mack 
(One to All) 

2d half 
(Two to All) 

ACADEMY (loew) 
Bandv ft Fields 
Al H Wild 
"Gent With Jimmy" 
(One to All) 

(2<i half) 
Geo Kane Bro 
Florence Bowes 
Boughton ft Turner 
Toomer ft Hewlns 



FISHKILL, N Y. 

FISHKILL (loew) 
"City Editor" 
(Three to All) 

2d half 
Ford ft Hyde 
(Three to All) 

Flint, Mich. 
BIJOU (wva) 
'Sun Mat 0~en) 
Old Sold Fiddlers 
College City 4 
Kingsbury ft Munson 
Arizona Trio 
Carroll ft Aubrey 

2d half 
8 Saxons 
Gee-Jays 
Dixon ft Dixon 
Emll Spats 
(One to All) 

Ft. Wayne, lad. 

TEMPLE (wva) 
"Models De Luxe" 
James R McCann Co 
Bell Canto 
Kaufman Sisters 
Sherman ft McNaugh- 

ton 
Wilson ft Dewey 

Grand Rapid. 

COLUMBIA (wva) 
Ray L Royce 
5 Musical Nosaee 
Raynon's Birds 
Nadell ft Kase 
Petit Famllv 
Schnee ft Fish 
(One to All) 

Hammond 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
Dick Gardner Co 
McNamee 
Valerie Sisters 
J W Keane Co 
Pearl ft Burn* 

Harrlaaare;, Pa. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
"Little Parislenne" 
Edward Esmond Co 
Hayden D ft Hayden 
Knute Ericson 
Adler ft Arline 
Swain Ostman 3 
(One to All) 

Hoknkfi, N. J. 
LYRIC (loew) 
Fred Elliott 
"Fun On Ocean" 
Granllle ft Mack 
Hall ft Clark 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Carter ft Davis 
Caulfield ft Driver 
Ward ft Smith 
Teddy Osborne's Pets 

Jarkaon, Mlea. 

BIJOU (wva) 
(Sun Mat Open) 

Moore's Rah Rah Boys 

Carter ft Bluford 

Mr ft Mrs Allison 

Fielding ft Carlos 

Bud Williamson 
2d half 

Hill. Char ft Hill 

H Beresford Co 

Ball ft West 

(Two to fill) 
Kalamamoo, Mich. 
MAJESTIC (wva) 

Broncho Busters 

Emille Egamor 

B Johnson ft Conway 

DeVelde ft Zelda 

Oskomon 

2d half 

Dan Sherman Co 

Nestor ft Dahlberg 

Crouch Richards Co 

DeMarest ft Doll 

(One to All) 

Kaaaaa City 

ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 

Mountain Ash Choir 

Creasy ft Dayne 

Great Lester 

Omeer Sisters 

Polly Moran 

Ronalr ft Ward 

Stanleys 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

White's Animals 

Veronl Verdi Bros 

Constance Windom Co 

Hugo Lutgene 

Travlllas ft Seal 

Lafayette. Ind. 

FAMILY (wva) 
"Whose Girl You" 

2d half 
Great Leon Co 
Tom ft Star la Moore 
Small ft Sisters 
West ft Charles 
Vannersons 

Laaelasx, Mlea. 

BIJOU (wva) 
8 Saxones 
Gee-Jays 
Dixon ft Dixon 
Emll Spats 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Old Sold Fiddlers 
College City 4 
Kingsbury ft Munson 
Arizona 3 
Carroll ft Aubrey 

La Porte 

PHOENIX (wva) 
Great Richards Co 
F ft K Carleton 



2d half 
Black ft McCone 
Snyder ft Buckley 

Llneola, Web. 

ORPHEUM 

Lew Sully 
Keno ft Greeu 
Chick Sales 
Louise Meyers 
W H St James Co 
Katie Gultlnl 
La Vler 

Le* Aaaelea 

ORPHEUM 
"Antique Girl" 
Wm Thompson Co 
Ashley ft Lee 
Howard's Ponies 
Gould ft Ashlyn 
Bertisch 
Minnie Allen 
Takiues 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Kretore 

Bud ft Nellie Helm 
Belle ft. Mayo 
"Kid Hamlet" 
James Reynolds 
Ladella Comlques 

PANTAGES 
Child's Hawaiian* 
5 Juggling Jewells 
Orpheus Comedy 4 
• Ned Burton Co 
Black Bros 

Mesapala 

ORPHEUM 
Master Gabriel Co 
Barry ft Wolford 
McKay ft Cantwell 
Milton ft Dolly Nobles 
Edna Luby 
Kremka Bros 
Jordan Zeno ft J 

Mllwaakee 

MAJESTIC (orph) 
"Kabaret Kids" 
Perea Sextet 
Little Billy 
Stein Hume ft T 
Jere Grady Co 
Thurber ft Madison 
Clara Ballerina 
May ft Addis 

EMPRESS (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Jacob's Dogs 
Eva Westcott Co 
Don Carney 
Macey's Models" 
Virginia Grant 
Minneapolis 
ORPHEUM 
Bertha Kallsh Co 
Watson's Farmyard 
Kaufmann Bros 
Bottomly Troupe 
Slmondet 

Godfrey ft Henderson 
Mathilda ft Elvira 
UNIQUE (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Und 

Plcchlanl Troupe 
Milt Araman 
Gaylord ft Heron 
3 Lorettes 

Montreal. Caa. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
"Spirit Paintings" 
Eva Taylor Co 
White ft Perry 
Brown ft Brown 
Willard Hutchinson Co 
Arco Bros 
Harris ft Harris 

FRANCAIS (loew) 
Harold McAullffe 
Corlnne Coffey 
French Stock Co 
Cooper A Rleardo 
Montrose Troupe 
(One to All) 

New Orleaaa 

ORPHEUM 
DIgby Bell Co 
Trovato 
Salerno 

Herbert ft Goldsmith 
Sully ft Husaey 
Delmore ft Light 
Belle Onri 

Hew aWeaelle. W . T 
NEW ROCHELLE 
(Loew) 
Hap Hazard 
Ford ft Hyde 
Roland Carter Co 

2d half 
5 Merry Youngsters 
Frankfords 
(One to All) 

Oakland. Cal. 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
E F Hawley Co 
Annie Kent 
Mintz ft Wuertz 
Mclntvre ft Hardy 
C ft F Usher 
Nat Willis 
Dixon ft Fields 
Williams ft Werner 
PANTAGES 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Woolfolk'a Chiclets 
Keene Trio 
Tom Kelly 
Gorflon ft Rica 
Alice Teddy 

Oadea 
ORPHEUM 
(Oct 10-12) 
Grace Cameron 
Dorothy Dalton Co 
Elsie Ruegger Co 
Bounding PaterBoi .x 
(Three to All) 



Omaha 

ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Adrienne Angarde Co 
Empire Comedy 4 
Wm iRaynore Co 
4 Florlmonds 
Bobbe ft Dale 
Winslow ft Stryker 
Belmont ft Earl 

Philadelphia 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Mrs Langtry 
Willis Family 
Rooney ft Bent 
Eugene Trio 
Richards ft Kyle 
Bert Terrell 
Langdons 
Delmar ft Delmar 
WILLIAM PENN 
(ubo) 
Frank Mills Players 
Hawthorne ft Burt 
"Seminary Girls" 
Billy McDermott 
Prosit Duo 
(One to AM) 

BIJOU (ubo) 
Clevelands 
Billy Davis 
Tendof Arabs 
Ruth Becker 
Devello Bros 
(One to fill) 

Ptttabarva 

GRAND (ubo) 
Valerie Bergere 
6 Am Dancers 
Bert Fttzgibbon 
Linton ft Lawrence 
.1 Al«xs 
(Three to All) 
HARRIS 

5 Musical Lawyers 
4 Stagpoolea 

3 Enter Fellows 
Aerial Belmonts 
Lucier ft Ellsworth 
Fogettl ft Bennett 
Gibson Craig 
(Two to fill) 

Pontine. Mich. 

HOWLAND (wva) 
(Sun Mat Open) 

Florence Arnold 

iRother ft Anthony 

Fosto ft Fusty 
2d half 

MIskell H ft Miller 

Fields ft Coco 

(Two to All) 

Port Huron 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
(Sun Mat Open) 

MIskell H ft Miller 

Fields ft Coco 

(Two to All) 

2d half 

•Rother ft Anthony 

Fosto ft Fuzzy 

Florence Arnold 

(One to All) 

Pertlaaft, Ore. 

ORPHEUM 
"In 1999" 
"Ballett Classlque" 
Melville ft Hlggins 
Aeahl Troupe 
Bowman Bros 
3 Collegians 
Berg Bros 

EMPRESS (sc) 
McRae ft Levering 
Link ft Robinson 
John Delmore Co 
Ed Dorking 
Chas Wildisch Co 
Scott ft Wilson 
Hylands ft Farmer 

PANTAGES 
(Opens Mon mat) 

6 American Beauties 
Schepp's Circus 
Espe ft Roth 

Cal Stewart 
Mabel Johnston 
Gypsy Wilson 

Pvnwldeaee 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Mason Keeler -■» 
The© Bendix Oo * 
Winsor McCay 
Mr ft Mrs J Barry 
Four Prevoats 
Coombs ft Idwell 
Laura Buckley 
Mnrcus ft Garelle 

Horkforil 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
Anita Bartling 
Marie Rossi 
Helen Hardy 
6 O'Connor Sis 
Hcrculano Slslera 

2d half 
Dick Gardner Co 

Saeraaseato 

DIPNBCK (orph) 
(Oct 9-13) 
Jack Wilson 3 
Franklyn Ardell Co 
Qulve McCarthy 
Mary Elizabeth 
Gautler's Toyshop 
Ben Lewin 
Ryan Bros 

CLUNIE (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Wallace's Cockatoos 
Joseph B McGee 
Dena Cooper Co 
Arlon 4 

Wayne £ Des Roehes 
PANTAGES 
(Opens Sun Mat) 
'Men edes" 
-ow & Eat. Drew 



VARIETY 



± 



Oean Smith. 
Oil Paintings. 
14 Mini.; One. 
Fifth Avenue. 

As an artist who paints in oils and 
has taken to vaudeville, Gean Smith 
and his stage work are interesting. Mr. 
Smith perhaps in the belief a vaude- 
ville audience needs something else 
beside the canvas product, has himself 
timed while painting. It makes the 
turn just a trifle freakish, whereas it 
should be dignified, as becomes the sub- 
ject matter, also the painter's appear- 
ance. The program mentions Mr. 
Smith will paint a horse's head in oil 
in four minutes and turn that head into 
a lion's in three minutes. He beat the 
time limit on each. Other subjects 
were a tiger's head, and the finish of 
the "Salvator-Tenney" race. This lat- 
ter, which became the finale of the act, 
had a small phonograph, with a large 
megaphone attachment, reel off Ellay 
Wheeler Wilcox's poem, "How Sal- 
vator Won"? Only those directly with- 
in the range of the horn probably 
heard how. The least that might have 
been done for this portion was to have 
supplied a Victrola that could give 
volume and distinctness. But Mr. 
Smith hardly needs the 1 accessories, nor 
the telephone book device of his assist- 
ant in locating someone in the audience 
who will take one of the paintings 
home. For rapid oil painting (far re- 
moved from cartoon work) Mr. Smith, 
who is a celebrated painter of the horse, 
is entitled to the best of vaudeville en- 
gagements on his act alone, which is un- 
usual and fully worthy. An artist paint- 
ing with brush from pallet must be con- 
fessed to be a decided relief to those 
who employed' various colored crayons 
for the formation of strokes designed 
to make people laugh. There's nothing 
infusing in Mr. Smith, but his vaude- 
ville painting is instructive and educa- 
tional. It might well keep some aspir- 
ing amateur in the gallery from becom- 
ing a comedian, turning his thoughts to 
the higher, loftier things. Bime* 



Bounding Owens. 

3 Mine.; Pull Stage. 

City. 

The Bounding Owens for time con- 
sumed must be establishing a record 
for American vaudeville. In England 
now and again a turn will be seen that 
works no longer than three minutes, 
but for America it is an innovation. 
It may not satisfy the managers but to 
the audience it is ideal. In the three 
minutes the Owens work they really 
do something. Ground tumbling, very 
good; hand-to-hand and shoulder-to- 
shoulder work, fine, and the bounding 
on the trampolin, excellent. Sounds like 
a whole act and it is a whole act. The 
Owens do as much as many of the 
other acts without stalling, that's all. 
The Flying Martins were caught at one 
showing doing 4J4 minutes, that's the 
nearest to the Owens on record. The 
Owens need dressing. Their appear- 
ance is against them. That alone will 
keep them on the small time. Dash. 



Ward and Weber. 

Dancing. 

9 Mine.; One. 

Hammerstein's. 

Judged from the standpoint of a 
couple of boy steppers, Jack Ward and 
Eddie Weber may be designated as top- 
notchers. In addition they have a 
beautiful special drop, well made and 
good fitting clothes and just a faint con- 
ception of what constitutes "an act." 
The latter may be worked out until it 
becomes more tangible and then the 
boys will have gone as far as they can 
in vaudeville in this line. Jolo. 



Great Tornados. 

Acrobatics. 

10 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Colonial. 

Great Tornados are the usual acro- 
batic troupe of the general run. Five 
men and a woman compose it. A 
"ringer" has a disguise so palpable it 
is funny. The work lacks finish, al- 
though there are two or three very 
good tricks. Appearance and manner 
of presenting are not good. After tin 
Metzzettis at the Hippodrome, the Tor- 
nados are very mild. Da%h. 



Lucky and Yost 

Singing and Comedy. 

19 Mins.; One, Full Stage, One. 

Grand Opera House (Sept 29). 

Lucky and Yost have rather an in- 
teresting comedy idea. Young man and 
woman, they open in a street scene in 
"one" and have a lovers' quarrel, to the 
accompaniment of a song. They part. 
A special interior showing adjoining 
business offices is disclosed. The girl 
pretends to be someone else and frames 
up a date with the young man who has 
the office on the other side of the wall. 
They reappear before the street drop- 
exposure, more quarrel, make up and 
go into a dance for the finish. The 
offering should make a good laughing 
number on the small time. Rush. 



Palmer-Lewis Co. (3). 
Travesty Skit. 

13 Mins.; One (2); Three (8); Full 
Stage (3) (Special Set and Drops). 

Chorus girl and manager. Leading 
lady on strike for her salary, chorus 
girl offers to replace her. She changes 
to tights, doing a lone song and dance 
while manager changes to "Spartacus' 
make-up, she again changing to Cleo- 
patra. In the ancient garb they essay 
the familiar travesty idea, worse than 
worthless unless well done — and this 
isn't. For a third try they change to 
Japs and wrestle with some sort of 
pantomiint dance. Pretentious looking 
for small U\m- Jolo. 



Willard Lee Hall and Co. (5). 
Dramatic Sketch. 
24 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Grand Opera House (Sept. 29). 

The program does not give the name 
of the sketch. Not that it matters at 
all. The proceedings begin with a song 
and dance and the curtain drops on a 
holocaust, in which a father shoots his 
son to death and then falls lifeless, 
stricken with heart disease. These two 
incidents take up about four minutes. 
The remaining twenty minutes are used 
by the father in telling "the story of 
his life." The audience very properly 
giggled during most of the act and ap- 
plauded tumultuously at the finale. Per- 
haps they were pleased at the untimely 
end of the two characters. The act 
won't do. Rush. 



Lydell and Butterworth. 

16 Mine.; One. 

Blackface Talk, Dancing and Songs. 

Grand Opera House (Sept 29). 

The team are man and woman, the 
latter making up in coffee color. They 
have some amusing talk, although there 
is a bit too much of it. The woman 
dresses attractively in pink and does a 
short specialty of hard shoe dancing. 
The man dresses in Bert Williams com- 
edy arrangement, and does very well 
at the finish with soft shoe eccentric 
dancing. The Grand Opera House 
Sunday afternoon audience, which filled 
the house, liked the team very much. 

Rush. 



Armstrong and Manly. 

Talk. 

12 Mins.; One. 

City. 

Armstrong and Manly have what is 
really a comedy dramatic sketch played 
in "one." A special park drop should 
be carried. A bench is placed before 
the drop and middle aged man saunters 
on reading a paper, about the gullible 
New Yorker who was trimmed for a few 
thousand by a gold brick scheme. He 
dwells for a few minutes upon what he 
thinks of these easy marks. Young man 
enters and becomes acquainted with the 
older man. Old party again expostu- 
lates upon the feeble mindedness of the 
easy New Yorkers. Stranger then pro- 
ceeds to trim the wise guy for $1,000. 
The story is quite plain from the start 
but interest is held through the audi- 
ence wondering how the bunk is to be 
slipped over. It comes unexpectedly, 
bringing with it also a surprise finish. 
The act is a trifle stilted at the opening 
but once it gets its stride it amuses. 
Both roles are exceedingly well played. 
The turn is worthy of the small big 
time and a try in an early position on 
the big bills. Dash. 



The Lansings. 

Equilibrists. 

9 Mins.; Two (Plush Curtain). 

A clean looking pair of equilibrists 
with the man doing most of the under- 
standing. The woman, who is able to 
lift him with comparative ease, alio 
does some excellent tricks of contor- 
tion, considering her size. The Lan- 
sings can hold attention on a big small 
time bill. Mark. 



Morton and Wayne. 

Songs. 

11 Mins.; One. 

American. 

Morton and Wayne are juvenile en- 
tertainers from below the Mason and 
Dixon line. In the "coon" songs their 
southern accent is very pronounced. 
Or the roof debut their work was ham- 
pered Monday night by the girl's cold, 
but notwithstanding they left a favor- 
able impression. The couple look like 
brother and sister. The girl seems 
quite young yet displays a combina- 
tion of vivacity and femininity that will 
aid her in making progress the right 
v ay. Personality is a big asset which 
Morton and Wayne possess. Only on? 
character number is used. In action, 
lie kids make no pretense at being 
anything but kids. The act can work 
the pop houses and be greatly bene- 
fited. They did well in the second po- 
sition. Mark. 



8piasel, Quail and Mack. 

Acrobatic 

U Mins.; Full Stage. Special Set. 

Orpheum. 

Spiisell, Quail and Mack are prob- 
ably another outgrowth of the orig- 
inal Spissel Bros, and Mack act. The 
boys have conceived a new background 
in which to show most of the old 
comedy bits. The set is a hotel kitchen 
with the chef working somewhat along 
the lines of the waiter in the old act. 
The act is slow at the start and does 
rot get going until half over. Wheu 
the rough work begins it livens up 
somewhat but more action must be 
placed in the opening if they with to 
continue as a closing feature on the 
bif bills as they are placed this week. 
Alore tumbling would be an improve- 
ment and comedy secured from the 
tumbling would carry it on still fur- 
ther. The act which sounds like that 
the late Frank Spissell had, needs a 
tew weeks working. Dasl^ 

Edney Bros, and Co. (1). 
Songs and Changes. 
16 Mins.; One (Special Drop). 
Columbia (Sept 29). 

The Edney Bros, have considerable 
in their turn, including several changes 
for the two boys, and a Chinatown dis- 
trict drop. The opening is of the two 
men as Chinks. Later a girl (the 
"Co.") appears. Songs and talk are 
run through, the men appearing often 
enough in disguises to cause one to be- 
lieve there are several people in the 
act, which may account for the "Com- 
pany" portion of the billing. One song 
is Joe Howard's "In the Smoke" re- 
written, sung by a dope, and there is 
a short speech in verse by the police- 
man that doesn't sound over well. The 
finish of the turn is the brightest bit, 
though the Chinamen characters are 
done v^ry well. The act, until it is 
remoulded and there seems an excel- 
lent chance to improve it by doing that, 
will not be fitted for the bigger houses, 
especially in New York, although it 
might stand up on the smalt-big time, 
and is a sure fire big small time turn. 

Sitne. 



Fox and De May. 

Talk and Dances. 

12 Mins.; One. 

Academy of Music (Sept 29). 

Fox and De May closed a long show 
at the Academy Sunday whkh proved 
a big handicap. It was aJtiCiix when 
they finished. The man iMIis in ec- 
centric attire and is 99 per cent of the 
act. The woman's best asset is her 
ability to work the "straight" questions 
in a voice that could be heard a block 
away. The man has some raw material, 
a parody in particular being decidedly 
"blue." Some of his quips also have 
the wrong ring. The man's dancing 
got over. Fox and De May could work 
the pop houses nicely. Mark. 



Flying Waldo. 

Trapeze Contortionist. 

7 Mins.; Three '(Exterior). 

Waldo first goes through contor- 
tions and then follows with some twist- 
ing and whirling feats on the trapeze. 
Nearly everything in Waldo's reper 
toire has been seen repeatedly around 
New York. He* should rest content 
with pop house contracts. Murk. 



20 



VARIETY 



OH! OH! DBLFHINE. 

And they said it couldn't be done! 

What? Why the construction of an 

intelligible farcical plot, with real tun 
in its situations, that could be put over 

in the form of a musical comedy. It 
has been done, to the queen's taste. 

Before many weeks have passed "Del- 
phine" will have been built into cur- 
rent slang. So that you will be in on 

the ground floor, we'll pass the tip thus 
early. Holding the right hand slightly 
elevated, palm out (in the attitude of 
one refusing the third drink) and mak- 
ing the right eye-lid quiver ever so 
slightly, "Delphine" means the acme 
of clever, sophisticated naughtiness. 
Clever naughtiness, mind you. 

Nobody but a Frenchman could have 
written the original farce, from which 
the musical comedy comes, without 
driving the neighbors off the block. 
This farce, reconstructed from the 
French of "Villa Primrose," is consist- 
ently funny. There's the point. It's 
funny. At times the fun approaches 
close to the wrong side of the line that 
divides witty daring and grossness, but 
it never crosses. One is inclined to 
forgive much to sparkling wit, the sort 
that the French have a positive genius 
for. That's what "Delphine" is made 
of. That and an unusually pretty score 
by Ivan Caryll. 

Frank Mclntyre is made much of in 
the production. He is cast as the butt 
of a complicated matrimonial joke. 
Of course his waist line is useful in de- 
veloping the broader humor, of which 
also there is plenty. 

The star, however, is C. M. S. Mc- 
Lellan, who wrote the book and lyrics. 
The man, mark you, who actually 
wrote a funny facical story adapted to 
musical comedy, in which the humor 
is innate, and not introduced by means 
of an interpolated specialty or an ec- 
centric dance. 

The numbers, both in the score and 
lyrics, score bull's eye after bull's eye. 
"Why Shouldn't I Tell You That," 
handled by Grace Edmond (Delphine), 
Mr. Mclntyre and Scott Welsh, de- 
liver the highest possible voltage of 
broad innuendo without a fatal 
shock. It is very sophisticated and 
wise in the oblique meaning of that 
word, but in some way that escapes 
explanation — it is without open of- 
fense. 

The purely musical hit of the piece 
is, of course, a waltz, called "The 
Venus Waltz," worked up to a tremen- 
dous climax, partly by the hypnotism 
that lurks in the swing of the score 
and partly by extremely skillful stage 
management. 

Honors go to Octavia Broske in the 
latter number. Besides being a lav- 
ish picture of Oriental loveliness, she 
has a splendid voice and a close ap- 
proach to perfection in ease of stage 
deportment. Mr. Welsh was an in- 
teresting variation from the conven- 
tional musical comedy tenor. In the 
first place he has not that chaste regu- 
larity of manly beauty that marks the 
type. He is merely nice looking in a 
human sort of way and — listen to this 
— he does not strut down center under 
the spot light and warble to his lady 
love in a soulful, sobbing voice. One 
even suspects that he has a sense of 
humor. Ruah. 



KINO HEN1Y V. 

When two such eminent English 
critics as William Archer and Clement 
Scott »aw fit to — metaphorically speak- 
ing of course — rave over Lewis Wall- 
er's "Henry V," it seems almost the 
height of temerity for an ordinary 
human to presume to even discuss the 
matter. 

Mr. Archer said that it was the best 

performance of a Shakespearean hero 

given by any English actor within 

the past twenty years; Mr. Scott that 
it was a revelation. Probably they said 
much more, but these are extracts from 
their reviews (written many years 
ago), which are reproduced on neatly 
printed folders freely distributed at 
Daly's theatre. 

On the "souvenir program" — not 
quite so freely distributed since there 
is a charge of ten cents for h — is 
chronicled the number of times and 
dates Mr. Waller had the distinction 
of being commanded to appear before 
the King and Queen of England. 

All of which does not alter one iota 
the indisputable fact that Mr. Waller's 
initial American appearance in the role 
created for him an enhanced appre- 
ciation of his art in the minds of met- 
ropolitan theatre-goers. 

So we will now pass to the acces- 
sories, both as to cast and production: 
Waller's chief "accessory" is Madge 
Titheradge as Princess Katherine. In 
addition, and a most welcome inno- 
vation, is her reading of the "Chorus." 
She is seated in a chair of ancient 
Grecian design on a large platform in 
"two," surrounded by purplish cur- 
tains, clad in a white robe. From this 
point of vantage she "reads" the pro- 
logues preceding each act with a dig- 
nity and understanding that make 
her a contender for stellar honors 
with Mr. Waller himself. Nothing 
could more thoroughly exemplify the 
little woman's versatility than her 
quick transition to the role of the 
French princess in the last act. 

The remainder of the supporting or- 
ganization was, on the whole, ade- 
quate. But the production was flimsy, 
crude and not even well improvised. 
There was a scant number of supernum- 
eraries to give the impression of a vast 
army, and they were badly rehearsed. 
The royal vestments, and those of the 
gentlemen at court — both the English 
and French courts — seemed dowdy. 
Even the curtain calls at the end of 
the acts were poorly managed. 

The town is full of financial hits, 
but Mr. Waller's revival of "King 
Henry V" is not one of them. 

Jolo. 



BURLINGTON GOMES BACK. 

Burlington, Vt, Oct. 2. 
Burlington as a legitimate stand has 
"come back." Recently Paul Gilmore 
came to town and the receipts were 
something over $100. Since then the 
following shows have played here and 
the following figures speak for them- 
selves: "The Yankee Girl," Aug. 17, 
$847; "Red Rose," Aug. 31, $1,171; 
"Fortune Hunter," Sept. 2, $839.50; 
"Three Twins," Sept. 7, $1,297; Alice 
Lloyd ("Little Miss Fix It"), Sept. 21. 
$1,214; "Bunty Pulls The Strings," Sept. 
26, $849. 



THE CASE OP BECKY. 

Any reviewer who cannot hang out 
his M. D. sign would be taking himself 
very seriously indeed, in a written ef- 
fort to dissect "The Case of Becky," 
a play that lays the surgeon's knife on 
the quack, gives the science of hyp- 
notism its stage opportunity, and 
leaves a David Belasco show after 
three acts as one of those quivering 
live wires that will make people think 
and talk. 

4 

There will be opinions galore over 
"Becky." It will be said it is weird, 
it's creepy, but it is holding, from the 
moment Dorothy in her second per- 
sonality as Becky, slides down the 
bannister in the devilishly hoydenish 
character that Edward Locke has made 
of her, until in the third act, with the 
pre-natal hypnotic influence stored 
within her sub-conscious mind, she 
defies the professional hypnotist who 
has had his power broken by her real 
father, the scientist. 

Mr. Locke has placed skirts on "Dr. 
Jekyl and Mr. Hyde." Frances Starr 
is entrusted with the double charac- 
ter. A Svengali touch is added to it. 
Miss Starr splendidly becomes the 
sweet Dorothy or the wild Becky. In 
her stage transition from the good to 
the bad girl (second act), she put forth 
her greatest effort. The change was 
made by Miss Starr while under the 
light of a student's lamp, facing the 
audience. The strain as she sought to 
repel the invasion of her baser self 
was a tense moment, but only one of 
many during the evening. 

The cast of seven contained players 
who gave the star invaluable support. 
Albert Bruning. as Dr. Emerson, the 
scientific student of hypnosis, stands 
first. Harry C. Browne, as the Doc- 
tor's assistant, was a hearty part of 
the action, in his build and his in- 
fectious laugh, besides which he had 
fallen in love with a nurse, who had 
no sense of humor (Mary Lawton). 

Professor Balzamo was the quack 
hypnotist. Years before the curtain 
arose he led away the wife of Dr. 
Emerson with a piercing glance, but 
found her an easy subject only when 
under his influence. During her 
travels with him as a "subject," she 
gave birth to Dorothy, who lived to 
believe the showman was her father, 
until undeceived by Dr. Emerson forc- 
ing the truth from him. Charles Dal- 
ton was the Professor. After "The 
Case of Becky, has appeared before 
audiences enough, the hypnotist who 
practices upon the theatrical stage will 
be nothing but a memory of the past. 

Still, that's neither here nor there. 
Go and see "Becky." It's worth see- 
ing twice, for it's a study from many 
angles. The hypnotic believer, un- 
believers and spirtualists can spend 
much of their time arguing over Mr 
Locke's piece — perhaps his theories as 

well. 

"Becky" cannot fail to attract, but 
maybe not as heavily at matinees as 
in the evening. But look out sharply, 
or you may be hypnotized yourself 
watching it. Sitne. 



JUNE MADNESS 

"June Madness" is dead. Produced 
at the Fulton Sept. 25, the newspaper 
reviewers rose up the following morn- 
ing and consigned it to the depths. 
They damned it unanimously, taking 
the righteous attitude that the portrayal 
of a woman who had sinned and there- 
after for twenty years suffered no com- 
punction for her lapse is out of order 
and an inexcusable breach of the pro- 
prieties, especially when the woman 
happens to be the mother of a daughter, 
who, to quote the line in "The 
Woman," didn't come through the cus- 
tom house. 

When Henry Kitchell Webster wrote 
"June Madness," he took stage conven- 
tions by the throat. Somewhere Mr. 
Webster has learned a vast deal of 
worldiness and appears to have been 
unable to resist talking about things 
which are barred from public discussion 
by a convention which is as fixed and 
unalterable as that which prescribes 6 
o'clock in America as the time to 
change to evening clothes. 

One of these conventions is that the 
woman who breaks the social law must 
weep and wail about her sin through 
three acts and ultimately die to slow 
music and lowered lights. Mr. Webster 
won't have it so. His woman with a 
past is a competent, successful person 
and reasonably happy. Also she scores 
a complete victory in a battle of wits 
over the wife of her employer, a woman 
who is cynically made to represent the 
littlemindedness of the ultra respectable 
matron. In a playwright this is cynic- 
ism run to violent madness. Some of 
the character relations may be true to 
life, but on the stage they just simply 
can't be done. Every woman who sees 
"June Madness" will receive some of 
the passages between the young people 
as a direct slap in the face. The sinister 
meaning they convey may have in it a 
germ of truth. If they have it's the 
sort of truth the cynic accepts, but even 
he doesn't talk about. 

Next time Mr. Webster is moved to 
discuss the sex question, let him ask 
any woman he knows, preferably a 
middle aged spinster school teacher, 
what she thinks of Kipling's "The Fe- 
male of the Species." In her answer 
he will learn many things. "June Mad- 
ness" does violence to everything held 
most dear to the American woman. 
Thereby it is hopelessly cursed. 

With the exception of Edward Em- 
ery and Miss Kelly, the players were 
stiff and stagey to the last degree. With 
the best play in the world they would 
have been inadequate. They added one 
more ground of complaint against the 
most hopeless play that has appeared 
in New York this season. 

Winthrop Ames, who stands for this 
piece, assumes the high art and uplift 
pose. There is no uplift in "June Mad- 
ness" nor is there any art atmosphere 
in the presence of either the house or 
the show manager in the box office at 
8:10 with his hat on and industrially 
polishing his finger nails. Rush. 



TREASURER AT A8TOR. 

Budd Robb, who has been managing 
one of Cohan & Harris' companies of 
"Officer 666." is the new treasurer 
of the Astor under C. & H.'s direction.. 



REVIVING JOHN QUINGET ADAMS. 

A revival of "John Quincey Adams" 
will be made after election by Charles 
F. Atkinson, of Boston. Atkinson will 
also have moving pictures made of the 
piece. 



VAfUBTY 



21 



SCRAPE O' THE PEN 

"Bunty," "Bunty" and again "Bunty" 
was all that could be heard around 
Weber's the opening night (Sept. 26) 
of Graham Moffatt's "A Scrape o' the 
Pen." Mr. Moffatt wrote "Bunty Pulls 
the Strings," which recently closed a 
long run at the Comedy, New York. 
Both being Scottish plays, comparison 
of the two by those having aeen both 
was perhaps inevitable, but without 
reason nevertheless. "A Scrape o' the 
Pen" is entitled to consideration and 
judgment on its own. 

That there should be any doubt 
whether New York can stand two plays 
dealing with Scotland is not well 
founded, since Broadway likes any- 
thing that is good — and "A Scrape o' 
the Pen" is good, very good indeed. 

The characters hold, because they 
are strange and quaint. There must 
be more in Scotland than there could 
have been in "Bunty" within the two 
hours or so required to play that piece. 
Why should New York not have a fur- 
ther insight into the customs of the 
Scotch, inclusive of their oddities, 
thriftiness, economy and superstitions? 

The story of "A Scrape" is far less 
than the characters. It deals merely 
with a common law marriage, bound by 
a written agreement between the par- 
ties. The son who contracted with a 
serving lass immediately left for South 
Africa. During his absence the com- 
mon law wife found out some things of 
his wild young youth that embittered 
her to the point she believed he could 
never redeem himself. The wife in 
name only, without imparting word 
of the secret wedding, married the 
foreman of the farm. When the wild 
• boy returned seven years later, he tore 
up the marriage certificate as his 
elderly parents wanted him to, and 
through his unnamed young daughter 
upstairs the old folks had taken care 
of, following the death of the mother 
the self same son deceived. 

The old father and mother are the 
main roles, and were excellently played, 
the father by Carl D. Lyle, the mother 
by Agnes Bartholomew. Miss Barthol- 
omew, but in her early twenties, gave 
a most charming performance. 

A comedy character in the person of 
a "professional mourner" (new over 
here) was capably handled by Edward 
Chester. It brought laughs, on appear- 
ance as well as the reason for his chosen 
profession, but the author missed a 
huge chance with this bit, by hold- 
ing down the dialog that could have 
pertained to hearses and funerals, to 
bring the professional mourner in di- 
rect vision as a principal. Lila Barclay, 
the twicely wedded, looked rather hand- 
some among her companions. Helen 
Baird had an eccentric role in costume 
and work, playing it well, while among 
the company of twenty or more (all 
foreigners appearing over here for 
the fin t time) several stood out for at- 
tention 

"A Scrape o' the Pen" is pure Scotch, 
but it is highly interesting, through the 
characters mainly. Whether strong 
enough to draw as far downtown as 
Weber's will have to be proven, but 
that the piece is well worth spending 
an evening to sit through is certain. 

Sime. 



THE PROSECUTOR 

Harry R. Mittenthal presents "The 
Prosecutor," a dramatization in four 
acts of William Hamilton Osborne's 
novel, "The Red Mouse." The play re- 
ceived its first showing at the Grand 
Opera House, Brooklyn, last week. It 
is framed up for the Weber pop priced 
theatres, with a production that repre- 
sents an unimportant investment and 
a cast which in all probability makes 
possible a small salary list. 

In the working out of a dramatic 

story an important rule to keep in mind 

is that axiom in Euclid, "A straight line 

is the shortest distance between two 

points." "The Prosecutor" ambles 
about in curves, half circles, elipses and 
every other variation from the direct. 
The characters become involved in ex- 
planations enough to drive the auditor 
to bewilderment. If Franklyn Searight, 
who made the stage version, had used 
more judgment in the selection of his 
material, he might have turned out a 
story that would be at least understand- 
able. 

The play has nearly all the faults to 
be found in dramatizations of novels. 
A large part of the big incidents take 
place off stage and have to be brought 
to the attention of the audience by con- 
versation between the characters. Much 
of the detail is carelessly arranged. 
What might have been an effective cli- 
max to the first act was wretchedly 
handled. A young spendthrift attempts 
to kill a gambler because he cheated at 
dice. But the audience had no way of 
knowing that the gambler had cheated. 
Besides when the spendthrift fired the 
shot he thought was fatal, his revolver, 
one of those automatic unloaders, 
"broke" and the shot was really fired 
off stage. 

Another factor in the development of 
the story was a scandal over a concrete 
contract in the building of the County 
Hospital. That's a fine romantic sub- 
ject to catch the interest of women the- 
atregoers 1 It is on a par with much 
of the rest of the play. 

The dramatic forces are badly mar- 
shalled. The women are pale, listless 
creations. Not one is able to secure 
the sympathy of the auditor. In novel 
form, it is possible that "The Red 
Mouse" was interesting. As a play it 
is hopelessly dull. 

The present company although for 
pop time, is most unsatisfactory. Louise 
Adams, who was an entirely unneces- 
sary character, practically disappeared 
after the first act. She was very pretty, 
but a poor reader of lines. Noel Trav- 
ers was the prosecutor. He did but 
fairly as an actor, although he had a 
part fhat was beyond hope. A New 
York district attorney docs not ordinar- 
ily argue law with his office boy. 

The Grand Opera House has an ad- 
mission scale up to SO cents. ."The 
Prosecutor" isn't worth the money. 

Rush. 



KYRLB BELLEW LEFT $10,000. 

The appraisal of the estate of Kyrle 
Bellew, who died last fall, was filed 
a few days ago. Out of a total of 
$10,000 there was left, after all de-; 
ductions, including $3,500 for a mauso- 
leum over the grave in WoodlawrA 
cemetery, $3,642.49. 



STEVE 

"Rediculum" at the Hebrew comedian 
says, when reaching far out, or when 
the famished word player utters 
"What's the juice?" applying both to 
"Steve." 

Arnold Daly was Steve in "Steve" at 
the Harris Saturday night. Maybe the 
curtain went up again Monday evening. 
It won't go up many times in New 
York, on the play Boston turned the 
cold shoulder to after its first perform- 
ance there under the billing of "The 
Wedding Journey." 

"Steve" is given by seven people, in 
three acts and the same set (parlor). 
The flop won't be an expensive one. 
Mr. Daly aroused some interest in the 
first act as the loaferish son of a widow. 
He was engaged to his mother's ward, 
with no tangible assets to realize the 
cost of a wedding journey upon. The 
girl had set her mind upon the trip, 
which would have taken in Niagara 
Falls. Every other means failing to 
raise money, the genteel tough con- 
cocted a scheme to have his hard labor- 
ing brother embezzle $600 from a labor 
association, to keep Steve out of jail 
for an imaginary crime. 

During the 'second act there was 
much whining, wailing and scenery eat- 
ing. The third act saw the sweetheart 
getting an inside line on the bad un, 
who was finally uncovered as a careless 
ne'er do well, leaving the hard work- 
ing son and the hard acting ward to 
confess they truly loved each other. 

Following the initial flash of Mr. 
Daly in his faithfully drawn character 
of the bred-by-night corner loafer, he 
commenced to tire the audience. His 
little group of self trained players 
helped along. Daly's role was against 
public sentiment. Nothing else in the 
piece was worth watching nor listening 
to. 

$600 is a small time affair to build 
a near melodrama around. John T. 
Mclntyre, a Philadelphia newspaper- 
man is the author. Mr. Mclntyre 
nicely worked out his story to the sat- 
isfaction of those remaining for the 
finish, but he did little in the telling. 
Not enough to compose a few minutes 
playlet that could get over in vaude- 
ville. » 

Julia Walcott was the mother who 
doted on Steve, in preference to the 
bread winner. Miss Walcott gave 
a fine sketch of the sort of mother 
intended. Josephine Victor was the 
ward, who had a lot of acting to do 
with few people about to stand off the 
effects. Her best work was performed 
in the last act. It couldn't remove, 
however, the memory of the one pre- 
ceding. It was said around the the- 
atre Miss Victor gave her very worst 
performance the opening night, hav- 
ing carried the part successfully in 
Boston. Harry Morris in a little 
bit as an Irishman was an Irishman, 
more so than Edward McWade as Pike, 
whatever Pike was, besides always be- 
ing in a hurry. Captain Pitzer might 
have been featured. William Walther 
played the Captain, from behind a win- 
dow and no one saw him Alphonz 
Ethier was the hard working son, soft, 
thick and honest. He failed to lend 
any valuable assistance. 

Arthur Hopkins "presented" Mr. 
Daly and his non-star company. H. H. 
Frazee quit after the Boston try. 

Sime. 



MERRY MAIDENS 

"Merry Maidens?" The title is a 

question. Can maidens bt merry in 

these modern times without silk hose? 

In a few country towns the answer 

might be yes but in New York and on 
the stage the "no" is emphatic. That is 
the worst that can be said of this sea- 
son's "Merry Maidens" show. Twenty 
choristers costumed in a manner that is 
quite befitting the burlesque of to-day 
are without the necessary silks to finish 
off the otherwise pretty and bountiful 
wardrobe. It is really a wasteful econ- 
omy. 

A good looking, good working, and 
very nearly good singing chorus is all 
that any burlesque show can hope for. 
The "Maidens" have it. The numbers 
come along under the same head as the 
production and these are good with 
also one draw back, light ejfects. There 
are too many color flashings. 

The numbers run to "rags" of the 
popular variety which is what burlesque 
audiences desire. At the 8th Avenue it 
is hard to put over a good number, the 
stage is small and the audience not of 
the best. This is aptly proven in the 
"Maidens" show where two corking 
numbers passed without return, while 
a poor one with a suggestive line in the 
chorus brought eight and ten encores. 
An exterior and interior set which also 
could not be shown at the 8th Avenue 
gave indications of being quite ade- 
quate. 

The comedy is for the most part of 
the old school variety but it is in the 
hands of capable comedians who get a 
great deal out of the rough work, re- 
maining well within the law. One or 
two of the bits should be shortened 
which would do away with the draggy 
periods now and again. Another speed 
restorer would be the elimination of 
the very poorly done living pictures. 

The principals go along with the 
chorus to make up a very good organ- 
ization capable of putting over a fast, 
snappy show which they are doing, for 
as a whole "The Merry Maidens" have 
an entirely satisfactory entertainment. 

The principals all start from scratch. 
No one is featured. Harry Fields in the 
Hebrew role would probably be called 
chief comedian. Fields is a good 
worker, rough in method but entirely 
clean and gets plenty of fun out of the 
many bits in which he is involved. 
George F. Hayes is right with Fields in 
the laugh department. A different rube 
constable in make up and style he is 
extremely funny whether alone or with 
the gang and his stuff gets over in cap- 
ital shape. Joe Phillips plays a Patsy, 
doing his best work in a couple of num- 
bers with Lilla Brennan. His efforts as 
a comedian are not noteworthy. Billy 
Stewart as a Chinaman in the opener 
does well but as an Englishman in the 
burlesque, is not there. The character 
should be changed. Jas. J. Howell doe> 
exceedingly well in a straight role help- 
ing the singing strength of the com- 
pany. 

Anna Wood.^ and Lilla Brennan an 
semi-soubrets and both girls do splen- 
didly. Good dressers and fa>t, gingery 
workers, they stand up well with tlii 
season's crop of burlesque women 
Blanche Curtis makes a very good lead 
ing woman, keeping pace with the sou 
brettes in dressing and holding up th< 
show's average. Dash. 



i 



22 



WORLD OF PLEASURE 

Very little change has occurred in Gor- 
don & North's "World of Pleasure," 
since last season. The story from 
"Playing the Ponies" remains the same, 
with its principal comedians, Fox and 
Stewart taking the former Yorke and 
Adams roles. Watson and Dwyer, a 
male team, have the second principal 
parts among the men, while Phrynette 
Ogden holds over as principal woman, 
with Lanier De Wolf and Pearl Daw- 
son the other two feminine principals. 
"Playing the Ponies" doesn't repeat 
very well. To thos; seeing it for the 
first time on the Eastern Wheel this 
season, it will appeal as a very good 
burlesque show. But for the second 
sighters, there is nothing, excepting a 
few new numbers, and these, sad to re- 
late, have no one to put them over. 
With number leaders, the show is weak. 
It was also the fault last season. The 
best number is "The Gorilla Grab" by 
chorus people. It stood out in last 
year's show, and could stand extending 
now. Miss Dawson doesn't commence 
to bring out "Hitchy Koo," a recent 
song hit. Miss Odgen through danc- 
ing a "Tommy" with Eddie Dwyer, does 
something for "Robert E. Lee," al- 
though the work for this song should 
have been given to the chorus. 

The choristers, eighteen women and 
four boys, do well enough in the song 
bits. If well led, they would make them 
much stronger. Miss Ogden is a big 
woman. To see her caper about in 
the "Lee" dancing encores is worth 
while. "Emancipation Day" is the final 
song, as it was before. Bobby Watson 
leads a Scotch number, with the girls 
piettily costumed. The chorus look 
very well dressed all the time. Watson 
sings "Let's Go Up to Molly's," and 
wears evening clothes while leading 
"Emancipation." Otherwise Mr. Wat- 
son doesn't dress for any especial atten- 
tion, and at times, suggests his rather 
old-fashioned straw hat is glued on. 

Watson and Dwyer use little from 
their vaudeville act. Dwyer plays the 
part of the jockey fairly well, with Wat- 
son as the "straight" just about pass- 
ing. Watson has a bad habit of looking 
into the wings when speaking lines. 
Miss De Wolf is trying for the soubret 
class, and Miss Dawson probably fits 
into her minor role as well as may be 
necessary. 

Fox and Stewart have parodies, and 
still make laughs out of the crockery- 
smashing scene, the best comedy bit 
in the piece. They have one new line 
that brings a scream. It is Fox saying 
to Stewart, "Come on, Jewish Person." 
The Hebrew team also have "I Don't 
Know" as the name of a horse to mix 
each other up with. Raymond and Cav- 
erly overlooked that one, which is just 
as good as **Watt St.," "Underwear" or 
"Try & Guess." 

Miss Ogden makes up for everything 
else in looks. Harry Yost is the same 
villun, while James Hall is the detective 
although it is hard to believe it. He 
shone most brightly as a "plant" for 
Miss De Wolf's singing of "When I Get 
You Alone To-night." 

Gordon & North could afford to 
cha-re a second season with "Playing 
the Ponies." The difference in receipts 
along the route will probably be aver- 
aged up in what would have been the 
expense account of a new show and 
reduction. Sime. 



VARlfeTY 



am 



mm 



HAMMERSTEIN 9 S. 

(Estimated Cost of Show $3,500). 

Chill wintry blasts permeated Ham- 
merstein's Monday evening and cast a 
blight over the entertainment. The or- 
chestra was three-fifths filled, half of 
the attendance failing to arrive before 
nine o'clock. 

When finally seated they sat quietly 
and throughout were rather sparing, in 
their applause. This may have been 
due to some extent to the fact that up 
to the sixth turn there was no comedy, 
by which time the audience was com- 
fortably settled into a condition of semi- 
somnolency. There was little or 
nothing throughout the entire evening's 
entertainment to rouse them from their 
apathy. 

The only genuinely big hit was the 

Avon Comedy Four, with up-to-date 

topical and political "gags" and two 
new songs which made more than good. 
After "cleaning up" in fine shape, they 
grew selfish and put over one song', 
too many. 

Dave Kindler, a whistler, opened the 
show at 8.10 to a handful of people and 
got little. Deodato, magician, in a con- 
ventional small time act, augmented by 
one trick that made a bid for "sensa- 
tionalism," had the second spot, closing 
with the American flag, Ward and 
Weber (New Acts), third. 

Frank Mills' Players in "Live Wires," 
offered a dramatic sketch that was 
either suggested by "The Woman," or 
vice versa. To those who have not 
seen David Belasco's production of last 
year the character of the telephone 
operator is novel. Rose Braham as the 
'phone girl, was exceptionally effective 
in her emotional work. Mae West 
(New Acts) has an uncommonly good 
number in "Good Night Nurse." A 
few more side remarks during her songs 
would increase the number of laughs 
in the act. 

There are two sketches on the bill — 
one dramatic, the other comedy — in 
which the audience is asked to imagine 
that a wig and gown will so alter a 
woman's appearance as to make her 
unrecognizable to the members of her 
immediate household. This situation is 
presented in Mabel Taliafero's act "The 
Return of Tori San" and in Tom 
Nawn's skit "The College Coach" 
(New Acts). Miss Taliafero dons a 
Japanese kimona and wig and you are 
asked to believe that her fiance fails to 
recognize her. In the Nawn act a girl 
makes .up as a woman of fifty, and her 
own father Tails to penetrate the dis- 
guise. The first half of the Taliafero 
sketch is too talky and the second a 
terrific straining in consistency. 

The Chadwick Trio opened the sec- 
ond half of the program without using 
the "mat" for Ida's dancing. As a 
consequence she received no encore. 
The encore in "one" got 'em though. 
Arthur Deagon starts with a new song, 
"Mabel at the Table." A little ven- 
triloquism with his woman dummy 
might build up his finish into a riot. 
Alexander and Scott in "next to clos- 
ing," at nearly eleven o'clock, did well 
in that hard spot, and the Flying 
Rogers, trapeze, closed the show, doing 
only four minutes of fast foot-to-foot 
and neck holds. Jolo. 



ATH AVENUE. 

(Estimated Coat of Show, $2,800.) 

The Fifth Avenue show did not run 
any too well Monday evening. A 
couple of shifts in the program, with 
Mosher, Hayes and Mosher, a comedy 
bicycle turn, given a very choice posi- 
tion, along with Russ Whytal and Co. 
in a dramatic sketch (New Acts) that 
depressed, left the impression of a 
broken up program. 

The Whytal sketch obliged Willa 
Holt Wakefield to follow it, in "one" 
a position that should never be as- 
signed this pianologist. Miss Wake- 
field should always have a parlor set, 
the daintiest the theatre affords. It 
was a battle to overcome the effects of 
the sketch, but the songs at the 
piano and Miss Wakefield's appearance 
shortly won over the house, causing 
her to sing "He's My Pal" for an en- 
core, also a new and brief little 
bit that was very pleasant. Just be- 
fore closing was Jock McKay (New 
Acts). He happened to be through cir- 
cumstances in a fortunate, though some- 
what hard position, and scored. Nina 
Payne and Co. in "La Somnambule," 
an act the William Morris Circuit 
through G. Molasso first gave to vaude- 
ville, closed the performance. It was 
proper the pantomime should be as far 
removed as possible from the Whytal 
sketch, but it is hardly a closing num- 
ber. v 

Delmar and Delmar in aerial vork 
opened the show. The applause at their 
finish, although the act was not 
"caught," indicated they were well 
liked. "No. 2" held Fay, Two Coleys 
and Fay, with their blackface routine 
and a couple of new songs, "The Rag- 
time Fireman" and "I'll Be With You 
in the Sweet Bye and Bye." The lat- 
ter song may not be new. Frank 
Byron and Louise Langdon and Co. 
(New Acts) were "No. 3" bringing 
their comedy piece close to the com- 
edy turn ahead of it. Gean Smith, who 
paints in oil (New Acts) appeared next, 
with the Whytal act, then Miss Wake- 
field, and the bicycle turn "No. 7." 

Mosher, Hayes and Mosher are 
dressing differently at the opening, the 
two straight men in sack suits. Other- 
wise they have about the same routine 
as formerly, with the blackface com- 
edian getting many laughs, and the act 
finishing big. 

A comfortable' filled house watched 
the performance. It contained an over- 
dose of gun play, revolvers figuring in 
three of the turns. Sime. 



CITY 

Last Saturday night they did business at 
the City. The house was capacity af 7:45. 
Between that time and 9 o'clock at least three 
relays came and departed, leaving the same 
cramped condition to the finish. 

It Is a good-looking class of people the City 
Is attracting. After scrutinising them care- 
fully K is not surprising that the Union 
Square, a block away, at higher prices, Is 
unable to do business. 

Three talking acta, all of the sketch order, 
without any great comedy, followed one an- 
other. It was enough to freeze up a holi- 
day audience. James Ellis, Co. talked for at 
least seventeen minutes; Armstrong and Man- 
ly added fourteen more to that and Camp- 
bell and Yates stuck on nineteen. There may 
have been a picture in between somewhere 
which only hit the show that much harder. 
Ellis and Co. have a comedy sketch along 
lines of bygone days. The man to keep two 
women apart tells each the other is crasy. 
That's a bad boy. Campbell and Yates also 
are too talky. They go to extremes for 
laughs which lose all value through the 
method. Even a country hotel ha* glasses, 
and It la not necessary for people to drink 
wine, their own wine, out of a wash basin. 



AMERICAN ROOF. 

The American Roof show Monday 
night showed so much class and gave 
3uch good entertainment the regulars 
had to pinch themselves at times. The 
program went over with a slappety 
bang that sent the audience away in 
a happy frame of mind. 

The bill maintained a pretty even 
balance with the comedy end having 
a shade. It started with an illustrated 
oong by a singer named Harry Laz- 
arus. The audience paid no attention 
to his name but did take notice of his 
good voice. Romaine, the magician, 
opened the show. While this act is 
more suited to a later spot, he finally 
got the audience coming his way with 
some of his trick specialties. Romaine's 
voice could be heard distinctly on the 
roof, that was a big point in his fa- 
vor. Morton and Wayne (New Acts) 
were second, with Five Merry Young- 
rtrs (New Acts) in the third posi- 
tion. Florence Bowes (New Acts) was 
fourth. She would have fared better 
exchanging places with Morton and 
Wayne. 

Just before intermission came a turn 
which proved a very big hit. Frank 
Stafford, the whistler, with two finely 
trained dogs, special scenery and as- 
sisted by a young woman, caught the 
audience from the start. Stafford is 
a clever entertainer and possesses 
enough histrionic ability to keep him 
on the stage were his whistling procliv- 
ities to leave him. The act, clean, re- 
fined and chockful of comedy and en- 
tertainment, is a great number for the 
pop houses. 

After intermission, Bissett and Scott, 
with the original "Hello, George," and 
his gold tooth, under a nom de plume 
(Geo. Caine and Bro.) scored with 
dancing. Percy Pollack and Co. in 
"The Gent With the Jimmy" (New 
Acts) were fairly well received. 

George Armstrong was an easy 
clean up. He has chopped his mono- 
log portion but sang some new par- 
odies that caused much laughter. Arm- 
strong could have remained in view 
for a long time. He quit while his 
stock was away above par. 

Armstrong was followed by Leon- 
ard and Louie, who gave a clean ex- 
hibition of equilibristics. The boys 
made a good closer for the American. 

Mark. 



The talk Is broken Into by a ballad sung by 
the man who possesses a sympathetic voice 
that can t fall on small time. The piece was 
picked up quietly by the City folks and al- 
lowed to travel along with no great demon- 
stration. 

Dynes and Dynes, once club jugglers of a 
good sort, are now very nearly a singing act. 
That Is, one of the Dynes has become pos- 
sessed of the Idea that he nhouM be doing 
a singing single. He Is almuHt doing onu at 
present. Featuring a frrak ion hie voice 
♦m? 1 " tne c° u J>l« *> a short Juggling routine, 
still very good, he sings e.gbt or ,-ine songs. 
Ballads and others are used, in ?„ost .is« the 
double voice thing Is perpetrated. Double 
voices are no longer a novelty. Almost any 
of the singers can fake a falnptto and kid 
some audiences, but Dyne> is not a singer 
For a club Juggler he ha« .1 good voce, and 
he should use It in the riilnpse numt er and 
while he is juggling. 

Raymond and Hall, a neat, little Kinging 
and dancing couple. shou!<' bm> clewed ud 
following all the talk, bi; t wrw Loo much 
for them and their effor;s I.J not receive 
what they should have. .Armstrong and Man- 
ley, Kathryn Delmar and 1 sounding Owens 
New Act8 - DAf.H. ' 

Lloyd and Whitehouse U ft the 
Bronx theatre program Tu. . t ; ;ly dis- 
satisfied with their position ,, u the bill 
"No. 2." 



VARIETY 
























COLONIAL. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $5,100.) 

Rather a good show surrounding 
Mrs. Langtry, although it might have 
been placed together in slightly better 
fashion. Three fast acts together at 
the opening gave the show such a 
running start, that when the let-up 
came, it began to stumble and all but 
missed falling over. Vera Michelena, 
billed for "No. 4," was shifted with 
Andy Rice, and made to open after 
intermission, a poor spot for a single 
woman and also a poor place to put 
Miss Michelena, whose youthful ap- 
pearance and dressing aren't doing 
Mrs. Langtry (who follows) a bit of 
good. 

Andy Rice, in "No. 4," talked for 
fifteen minutes before the John P. 
Wade sketch. Andy should have been 
"No. 2," Mayme Remington and Picks 
to open after intermission, and Miss 
Michelena left "No. 4." 

The Remington Picks would have 
lifted the audience right up after the 
interval and given plenty of life for 
the rest of the evening. "No. 2" act 
easily received as much as any turn of 
the evening. There is no doubt but 
that Miss Remington has the best act 
she has ever had and as good a pick 
offering as vaudeville has seen. 

John P. Wade and Co. in "Marse 
Shelby's Chicken Dinner" closed the 
first half and did very well. The act 
looks fifty per cent, better at the Co- 
lonial than it did at Hammerstein's.-, 
The audience followed the story in- 
tently, laughing quietly at the col- 
ored man's quaint remarks. The pa- 
thetic touch,, nicely blended into the 
story, also hit its mark. 

Cross and Josephine had their work 
cut out, following the long program in 
the next to closing position. Unques- 
tionably many had only come to see 
Mrs. Langtry. When she finished it 
was to be expected there would be 
a leave-taking, but it didn't get tar. 
Cross and Josephine soon had every- 
one interested and passed through their 
dancing and singing into the burlesque 
melodrama in rapid succession. It is 
strange what a hold the burlesque 
thing has. The house simply rocked 
at the Claud Eclair stuff. 

Hanlon Bros, and Co. wene "No. 3" 
and fitted in as a speed number in 
dovetail fashion. The act improves t 
every time it is seen. The mirror work 
is almost perfect now and the bit, as 
well as that following in the "Bell- 
boy's Dream," drew big applause. It's 
a live number of the sort that vaude- 
ville is beginning to need to liven up 
these bills that have two and three 
sketches on them. 

Ramsdell Trio, Mrs. Langtry, Great 
Tornados, and Vera Michelena (New 
Acts). Dash. 









PAULINE RETURNS TO ENGLAND. 

Pauline, with a six weeks' contract 
abroad through the Marinelli agency, 
sails Saturday to open Oct. 14 in Lon- 
don. 

The hypnotist was offered $1,000 for 
one week's appeal ance at the De fCalb 
theatre by I. Fluegelman of the Con- 
solidated Offices but would not accept 
unless he was given three weeks at 
the house with others on the Circuit 
to follow 



UNION SQUARE. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $3,700.) 

With "The System" running more 
than half an hour, the Union Square 
I '11 was long. The order was torn wide 
open in an effort to hasten the action, 
but even then it was 11.25 when the 
pictures went on Monday night. 

Billy Halligan and Dama Sykes were 
billed to go on "No. 2," but in the 
reorganization appeared "No. 6," 
changing places with Brady and Ma- 
honey. A good deal of Halligan's 
"quick stuff" sailed out of reach. He 
(v«lled the neatest local on the police 
investigation that has come to the sur- 
face so far, but there was never a rip- 
ple. That small incident spoke vol- 
umes for the class of audience that had 
been attracted by the much exploited 
Taylor Granville sketch. Halligan is 
*'unny and for once the Union Square 
program does not overstate when it 
describes Miss Sykes as a "pretty girl." 

Darrell and' Conway have a rattling 
good start with the entrance of the 
gabby actress, a lot of novelty, and a 
capital singing and costume change fin- 
ifh Emily Darrell does "choose" bits 
of James J. Morton's monolog unnec- 
essarily. Their best material is the 
fast minstrel finish with the brilliant 
costume changes of Miss Darrell's. The 
final hoop-skirt arrangement is exceed- 
ingly pretty. The couple put over a 
substantial hit in an important spot 
("No. 4"). 

Ben Beyer and Brother opened the 
fhow with a good comedy bicycle spe- 
cialty. The blackface member does 
just enough clowning. He is one of 
the few who does not force his com- 
edy. Brady and Mahoney show som*? 
4 enterprise in dressing and setting a 
rather ordinal y talking act. The 
''gags" caught laughter and the paro- 
dies at the finish gave them the usual 
allotment of applause for the finish. 

Patrice and "A New Year's Dream" 
made a satisfactory number for "No. 3," 
although it could scarcely be called a 
novelty. Darrell and Conway followed 
and really woke the audience up to 
real enthusiasm. Mrs. Gardner Crane 
and Co., "The Little Sunbeam" made 
pnother good laughing period. Mrs. 
Crane gets effective comedy by means 
of her generous conformation. Not 
that it is buffoonery, for she makes 
a really humorous characterization of 
the moving-picture actress. 

Eelle Baker had a tough spot follow- 
ing "The System." Perhaps that was 
why she roughened up her turn. The 
wriggle that accompanied her final 
number, "The Ghost of the Violin," 
was not altogether delicate but it had 
the desired effect in making the audi- 
ence pay attention. 

Marceline, with Van Cleve and 
"Pete" held 'em in at the finish. Mar- 
cdine's name helped a good deal to this 
desirable result and his familiar non- 
sense kept interest up. Rush. 



"101" FIGHTS RAILROAD. 

Hot Springs, Ark., Oct. 2. 

The Miller Bros, and Edward Ar- 
lington have lodged complaint with 
the Commercial Club against the Iron 
Mountain Railroad. 

The circusmen allege the carrier re- 
fused to transport "101" from Little 
Rock to Hot Springs. The railroad 
entered a general denial. 



ORPHEUM 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $4,100.) 
Everyone doesn't like vaudeville, 
strange as that may sound. It's pretty 
ticklish to ask a girl to go to a vaude- 
ville show when you have only known 
her a week, and she's probably think- 
ing of Broadway successes. 

Desire and courage, however, are 

nearer related than step-sisters, so the 
question went over and was affirma- 
tively met. 

That the show was in Brooklyn didn't 
enter in the original question. Quite 
some little finessing to make that fol- 
low. 

It's quite a trip from lower Madison 
avenue (a swell neighborhood — once) 
to the Orpheum. The journey was ac- 
complished in almost dead silence, but 
like all other subway trips, it finally 
ended. It was a harrowing forty-five 
minutes, with the regular stock drop- 
ping a point a minute. 

Buckley's Dogs had finished in the 
opening position, and McCormack and 
Irving were well on their way, when 
the seats were reached for the Girl 
to watch the performance. 

Always pleased to hear what others 
may think of a vaudeville bill, her opin- 
ims were much the more interesting. 
She needed no urging. McCormack 
and Irving, a "bench" "two-act" in 
'one" (that would be Chinese to her 
though), caught it from the start. 
"Rather a good-looking couple," deliv- 
ered nonchalant-like. "They work 
awfully hard though, and why do they 
have that light on them (spot)? The 
girl looks so much prettier with all the 
lights." Things began to brighten up 
a little for it was evident that the 
Girl's vaudeville education had not been 
wholly neglected. 

Hermine Shone and Co. were "No. 
3 " This was to be a test. Sense 
of humor is a quality always uncertain 
in girls. The sketch ran on its way 
to a certain number of laughs, but not 
a chuckle from Girl. Her first remark 
was "Does this act ever play New 
York?" Brooklyn to her is a foreign 
clime. Yes, the act has played New 
York. The Colonial? Yes. Why? 
Give up. Well, there must be a rea- 
son, I think it's the worst thing I've 
ever seen. Don't you think that fire 
business is funny? No, I don't, and 
I think it's as poor a company as could 
b? gathered. 

That was enough, and it looked du- 
bious for Felix Adler, but there was 
no reason, for the Girl liked Felix, 
thought he was cute looking and she 
h'Ughed loudly at the ventriloquial bur- 
lesque. "Detective Keen" caught her 
fancy quickly. She didn't speak until 
after the finish. Wasn't that an odd 
ending? And what a good company, 
si different from that other sketch 
(Herminie Shone and Co.). Oh, I 
liked that. 

Intermission passed without casual- 
ties Cooper and Robinson elicited no 
comment. Lulu Glaser's (New Acts) 
nr.me perked up the Girl a bit. After 
bcr appearance, she ventured, "Doesn't 
she look old?" Was that catty? The 
Girl redeemed herself when Miss Gla- 
ser reappeared in a pretty pink frock, 
by remarking it must have been the 
maid's costume, and the comparison 
with the looks of the maid in "De- 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

At the popular scale of prices, the 
Grand Opera House offered a capital 
vaudeville entertainment Sunday. The 
single exception was the mock-dramatic 
sketch of Willard Lee Hall and Co. 
(New Acts). Coming well along in the 
program the turn left a gap and injured 
the running, but only temporarily. 
Marie Dreams who followed made a 
light number, but occasioned enough 
curiosity to sustain interest in her turn. 
From that point on the show ran splen- 
didly, with a steady succession of laugh- 
ing numbers to a climax in "Back to 

Wellington," capitally done by Ed 
Howard and Bert Show. The act was 
formerly played by Howard and North. 

The Grand Opera House clientele 
likes comedy. It is perhaps not over 
particular as to the subtlety of the 
things it laughs at, but it does rise to 
the occasion when it gets an oppor- 
tunity. 

Stuyvesant and King Sisters (New 
Acts) held an early position. Lydell 
and Butterworth (New Acts) came 
next. 

Miss Dreams has a powerful mascu- 
line voice, but is a woman. The audi- 
ence was puzzled to determine Marie's 
sex, and was not entirely satisfied, even 
when the singer walked off pulling at 
her long hair to prove it was no wig 
and that skirts were the proper attire. 

Dan Mason and Co. put over a solid 
laughing period with "The New Chauf- 
feur," an uproarious comedy sketch in 
which the farcical situation is built along 
much the same lines as that of "The 
New Coachman," the former vehicle of 
Louis Simon and Grace Gardner. 
Lucky and Yost (New Acts), Tilford, 
ventriloquist (New Acts). 

"Back to Wellington," closing the 
show, was the same effective talking act. 

The Sunday afternoon audience filled 
the house comfortably,. In spite of its 
disposition to laugh easily, that Eighth 
avenue crowd won't be kidded. The 
Lee Hall sketch with its dramatic piffle 
was received with a wise chuckle. 
Forceful comedy and good clean spe- 
cialty material are what the Grand de- 
mands. Rush. 

tective Keen" (a little beauty) for Lulu 
certainly was pretty now. Thomas D. 
Richards with all the glitter didn't start 
anything and Girl as a vaudeville audi- 
erce was highly approved of. 

Budd Fisher's boyish appearance and 
pleasant personality aroused her to en- 
thusiasm, but the details of Fisher's 
romantic marriage last spring clogged 
up that line of thought. 

Spissell, Quail and Tom (New Acts) 
found the Girl very busy with coat and 
hat Her expression said I'm waiting 
f'oi you. 

Vaudeville was not discussed on the 
homeward trip, but at the door an- 
other attack of courage was enough 
to quoth: "1 go to another show next 
Monday night." The answer was a 
c^i.estion: "Do you know many girls 
in New York?" "Yes, a few." Then 
it came over. "Then you won't have 
t » go alone, will you 5 " Dasf^ 



The Gertrude Hoffmann Revue will 
open to-morrow (Saturday) at Albany 
with a matinee. 



24 



VARIETY 



gfl 



BILLS OF NEXT WEEK 
(Continued from page 18.) 



Copeland A Pay to u 
Flo ft Ollle Walters 
Great Hurrah Co 
Savlaaw. Mich. 
JEFFERS (wva) 
(Sun Mat Open) 
F Ireland A Girls 
J T Ray Co 
J C Nugent Co 
Maggie LeClalr 
Sing Fong Lee 



ffal+aa, M 
SALEM (loew) 
Law ton 

Anderson ft Oolnes 
"Tommy Dancer* " 

2d half 
Lot* ft Height 
Hon'- Kong 
Tor • f Dancers 

«nit Lak» 

ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 

Ed Hayes Co 

Caesar Nesl 

DeWItt Burns & T 

Whitfield ft Ireland 

Van Bros 

Koners Bros 

John Hlaglns 

EMPRESS (ec) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Oranto ft Maud 

Manley ft Walsh 

Helen Primrose 

Onalp 

Lee Tung Foo 

Fujiyama 



Iss ¥H«_ 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Son Mat) 

Llna Pantier 

Holden ft Harron 

Rogers A Melntoah 

Daniels ft Conrad 

Deodlma 

8AVOY (p) 
(Opens Sun Mat) 

"Star Bout" 

Lorraine Dudley Co 

PtotoI 

Lillian Bisters 

Aopllo Trio 



Sis 



ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Ethel Barrymore Co 

Owen McOiveney 

Owen Clark 

Nanon Opera Co 

Gray ft Graham 

Dlero 

Wonder Kettle 

La Mase 3 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Chapman ft Berube 

Russell ft Church 

Jura. R ft St John 

Ward Klare Co 

Green McH ft Deane 

"Night Roof Garden" 

PANTAGES 

(Open Sun Mat) 

Monkey Hippodrome 

Dewey ft Dolls 

Eldrldge ft Barlowe 

Davie ft Scott 

Van ft Pierce 

St. Loale 

COLUMBIA (ubo) 
Grapewln ft Chance 
Lola Cotton 
Wynn ft Russon 
Wilson Circus 
Stewart Sisters Co 
Hopkins ft Axtell 
Harry Atkinson 
Rials 

COLUMBIA (orph) 
Grapewln ft Chance 
Lola Cotton 
Wynn ft Russon 
Hlckey's Circus 
Stewart Sis ft Sects 
Hopklns-Axtell 8 
Harry Atkinson 
Tha Rials 



SHENANDOAH 
(craw) 

Herbert 

Neville ft Remington 
Boston Von Co 
Bob Allbright 
Kern's Seals 

MIKADO (craw) 
Chlyo Co 
The Klnga 
Miss Eracky 
S Normans 
Frank Rodgers 

AVENUE (craw) 
Rose Ben Heur Co 
Billy ft Betty Sells 
Van Dell 

Harmon ft Malcom 
Nettie Carroll Troupe 

KINGS (craw) 
Schaller Bros 
Cameron ft O'Connor 
Leslie Haesen 
Pete Mack Co 
"Xmas Belles" 

HIPPODROME 
"Rose of Penile" 
Onetta 

Holler ft Girls 
Marlon ft Darrell 
Tom Brentford 
Lee Klase Co 
Carman ft Roberts 
Borofsky Troupe 
Kink's Males 

PRINCESS 
Princess Maids 
"Mixed Pickles" 
Douthelt ft Jones 
Browne ft Collins 
*t. Paul 
ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Matt 
"Every wife" 
Morris ft Allen 
Mignonette Kokln 
Oalettl's Monkeys 
Ed Morton 
De Witt Young ft 
Neil sen 's Boys 

EMPRESS (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Geo B Reno Co 
8 Gerts 
Mab ft Weiss 
Lottie Williams Co 

fteattl* 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Amelia Bingham Co 
Nellie Nichols 
Frank Morrell 
Slivers 

Lewis ft Dody 
Azard Bros 
Flying Russells 

EMPRESS (ec) 
Falls ft Falls 
Glen Ellison 
Leonard ft Whitney 
Howell ft Scott 
"Dance Violins" 
(One to fill) 

PANTAGES 
Ellis Nowlin Troupe 
Gertrude L Folsom Co 
Mabel Elaine 
Twin City 4 
8 Kelcey Slaters 

Mt«»n* City 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 

"Drums Oude" 

Florentine Singers 

Merrill ft Otto 

CaselU's Dogs 

Lew Cooper 

Kemps << 

Lockhardt ft Leddy 
South Bend 
ORPHEUM (wva) 

Black ft McCone 

Dooley ft Parker 

Five Armanis 

("has Gibbs 

Spellman'e Bears 
2d half 

Celest ft Co 

Moore ft Browning 

Jamee Grady Co 



Coogan ft Parks 
Karlos Marionette 

ORPHEUM 

(Open 8un Mat) 
Mine Llebschen" 
Great Howard 
Beatrice Mlchelena 
Claudius & Scarlet 
('has Olcott 
2 Alfreds 
Les Marco Belli 

EMPRESS (so) 
Marseilles 
Fred Morton 
Prince Floro 
McOinnls Bros 
•Barber Shop" 

PANTAGES 
(Open Bun Mat( 
Marimbaphone 
Whitney's Dolls 
Bessie Leonard 
Rutherford ft Monroe 
John Zimmer 
Green ft Parker 

Sprtsurtteld 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
(wva agents) 
Kelly Shuster Co 

2d half 
Kelly Shuster Co 

*>rartiK« 

GRAND 
Julius Steger ft 

Hermine hione ft Co 1/ David Kidd 
Francis Yates / Edwin George 

Devine ft Williams'*' 
Hoey ft Lee 



VtwtaHa. B. C. 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Ling ft Long 
Weston & Leon 
Alf Holt 
Barney Gllmore 
W H Brown Co 

WsHhlst;iHN 
CHASE'S (ubo. 
Mclntyre ft Hesth 
Edith Helena 

t I 1 A tfl." 

M.iv > r,< r'«ur 
YoCormuck ft Irving 
CJrude M koode 

Waterloo 

MAJESTIC (wvr) 
Grey ft Peters 
Fred Griffith 
Janet Louden Co 
Nevins ft Erwood 
Four Vanls 

2d half 
L H Wsterloo 
Ai ita BartlinK 
Marie Rossi 
Helen Hardy 
O'Connor Sisters 
Herculano Slaters 

ORPHEUM 
Ethel Green 
. Toots Pake 
J Oracle Emmett Co 
Co /Rayno's Bulldog*; 



Lew Hoffman Lr 
Hamsdell Trio 

ballots 

Tirosu 
EMPRESS (sc) 
Neuss ft Eldred ' 
Klass ft Bernie 
Robt HUdreih Co 
"Walts Dream" 
Bohemian 4 
Verona Troupe 
PANTAGES 
(Open Mon Mat) 
"Girl of Golden Gate" 
Eleanor Otis Co 
Millard Bros 
DeLea ft Orma 
Esmeralda 

Terra Haute 

VARIETIES (wva) 
Vannersons 
Tom ft Staccla Moore 
Leon Co 

B Morgan ft Battle 
Howard Bros 
Gierro ft Carmen 
Connelly Slaters 
4 Stuart Slaters 
Kramer B ft Russell 
Emory Goyt 3 

VARIETIES <wT») 
Great Leon Co 
Tom ft Stacla Moore 
Howard Bros 
Vannersons 
Morgan ft Betty 
2d half 
4 Fly Valentlnoe 
Connolly Sisters 
Margaret Bird Co 
Guerro ft Carmen 
Goyt 3 

I Hon. N. Y 
SHUBERT (ubo) 
Romalo ft Delano 
Three Lyres 
Reisner & Gores 
"Top World" Dancers 
Olive Briscoe 
"Emperor ft Empress" 
Delmore ft Oneida 

ORPHEUM (sc) 
Bessie's Cockatoos 
Collins ft Hart 
Arthur Whitelaw 
Dancing Maddens 
Italian Troubadors 
"Delicatessen Shop" 

PANTAGES 
"Minstrel Misses" 
Readlck-Freeman Co 
O'Neal ft Walmsley 
Howard Landford 
Zara Carmen 3 



Ombras Trio 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Carly's Dogs 
"Number 44" 
3 Staleys 
Ell Dawson 
Brooklyn Comedy 4 

Berlin 

WINTDRGARTBN 

(October) 
Grasal 
Teddy 
Hardt 
Bordln 
3 Rubee 
Bruckner 
Carlton 
Mada Mlnty 
Yvette 

Collins ft Hart 
Tiller 

Carlisle Kawbawgan 
Pat-In. 
OLYMPIA 

(October) 
"Quaker Girl" 
Alice O'Brien 
Roeny Dherls 
Miss Lswler 
Kervyl 
H Leonl 
Dorvllle 
Albers 
Harry Mass 
W G Jackson Troupe 
Manvllle 
FOLIES BERGERE 

(October) 
Willy Pantser 
Anna Doherty 
Mallls ft Bart 
(Maurice Cronln 
Bert French ft Alice 

Els 
Jules Moy 
"Eternal Waltz" 
Jane Marnac 
P Ardot, Duval 

ETOILE PALACE 
Morisoff 

Kaufmann Bros 
2 Mltsutas 
Bruel 

La Fraequlta ft Trio 
Buchevll 
The Bengalis 

Vlennn 
RONACHER'S 

(October) 
Permanes 
The Athletes 
Kajlyama 
Jarrow 

Vtttoria ft Qeorgettl 
Olympia Girls 
Holden 

Clown Barker 
Esmee 



SHOWS NEXT WEEK. 

Now York. 

"A SCRAPS O' TH8) PEN' '—Weber's (3d 
week). —_* 

BDUGHT AND PAID FOR"— West Bad. 

BROADWAY JONB8" (Geo. M. Cohan)— 
Cohan's (3d week). 

•FANNY'S FIRST PLAY"— Comedy (4th 
week). 

HANKY PANKY"— Broadway (10th week). 

HENRY V" (Lewis Waller)— Daly's (2d 

JUNE "MADNESS"— FuRon (3d weak). 
"LITTLE MIS8 BROWN"-48th Street (7th 

WAftk ) 

MAN AND SUPERMAN"— Hudson (2d 

week). 

"MILESTONES"— Liberty (4th week). 
"MIND THE PAINT GIRL" (Billie Burke)— 

Lyceum (5th week). 
"MY BEST GIRL"— Park ((5th week). 

OFFICER 666"— Gaiety (9th week). 

OH ( 

week). 

"READY MONEY"— Elliott (8th weak). 
REPERTOIRE (Sothern and Marlowe)— Man- 
hattan (2d week). 



OH OH DELPHINE"— Knickerbocker (2d 



SPOON ER STOCK— Metropolle (5»th week). 

[MY' -Criterion (2d 
week). 



"TANTALIZING TOM1 



THE GIRL AT THE GATE"— La Salle (0t» 

week). 
-KISMET" (Otis Skinner)— Illinois (3d week) 

FINE FEATHERS"— Cort (6th week). 
"MILESTONES"— Blackstone (3d week). 
"THE GIRL FROM MONTMARTE"— Chicago 

O. H. (2d week). 
"THE NEW SON"— Power's (2d week). 
"DON'T LIE TO YOUR WIFE" (Dave Lewis) 

—Victoria (let week). 

THE MILITARY GIRL" (Lean ft Holbrook) 

—American M. H. (7th week). 

THE SECRET OF 8USANNE"— Fine Arts 
(1st week) 

Philadelphia. 

"RETURN OF PETER GRIMM"— Broad. 

"ZIEGFELD'S FOLLIES"— Forrest. 

"THE LADY OF THE SLIPPER"— Chestnut 

St. Opera House. 
"THE SEARCHLIGHT"- Walnut. 
"GET-RICH-QUICK WALLINGFORD'-Gar- 

rick 

"THE WALL STREET GIRL"— Lyric. 

"THE MILLION"— Adelphl. 

"THE GAMBLERS"— Grand Opera House. 

"MY WIFE'S FAMILY"— Arch. 

"THE WRONG WAY"— Hart's. 

"THE DAWN OF TO-MORROW "—Chestnut 

St. Stock. 
"CARMEN"— American Stock. 



"THE ATTACK" (John Mason)— Carrie k (4th 

week). 
"THE BRUTE"— Lyric (1st weak). 

THE CASE OF BECKY" (Frances Starr)— 

Belasco (2d week). 
"THE CHARITY GIRL"— Globe (2d week). 
"THE CONCERT"— Grand Opera House. 
"THE COUNT OF LUXEMBOURG"— New 

Amsterdam (4th week). 
"THE DAUGHTER OF HEAVBN"-<3«ntury 

(1st week) 
"THE GIRL FROM BRIGHTON"— Academy 

(6th week). 
"THE GOVERNOR'S LADY"— Republic (5th 

week). 
"THE MASTER OF TUB HOUSE"— Lyric 

(8th week). 
"THE MERRY COUNTESS' '-Casino (8th 

week). 
"THE PASSING SHOW"— Winter Garden 

(12th week). 
"THE PERPLEXED HUSBAND" (John 

Drew)— Empire (6th week). 
"THE WOMAN HATER'S CLUB"— Aetor (1st 

week) 
"UNDER MANY FLAGS"— Hippodrome (6th 

week). 
"WITHIN THE LAW"— Eltlnge (5th week). 

CaJoawo. 

"EGYPT" (Margaret Anglln)— Garrlck (2d 

week). 
"THE RED WIDOW" (Raymond Hitchcock)— 

G. O. H. (1st week). 
"THE BLUE BIRD"— Lyric (2d week). 
"A WINSOME WIDOW" (Frank Tinney)— 

Colonial (5th week). 
"THE MAN HIGHER UP"— Olympic (4th 

week). 
"A MODERN EVE"— Princess (25th week). 
"GET-RICH-QUICK WALLINGFORD"— Mc- 

Vlcker's (2d week). 
"THE GARDEN OF ALLAH"— Auditorium 

(6th week). 



A vaudeville manager declared this 
week that he would make an effort to 
have Elinor Glynn's newest novel, "A 
Diary of My Honeymoon/' drama- 
tized for a variety presentation. 

The two doge in the Bob and Tip 
act, billed for the Alhambra this week, 
were poisoned, necessitating a cancel- 
lation of the turn, whicti was replaced 
by Woods Bros. 

At a matinee Sunday in a Broadway 
theatre where a vaudeville perform- 
ance was being given, a slight commo- 
tion in the rear of the orchestra was 
sufficient to attract the attention of 
the entire house. It was caused 
through several boys walking out to- 
gether while an act was on, when the 
theatre was quiet. The only ones 
who stood up to locate the source, 
were people in the orchestra, who are 
connected with the show business in 
one way another. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unlets otherwise wrttd, the following reports are for the current week. 

^'d®™ CHICAGO 



Rep 



ntsrflve 



▼ABORT'S CHICAGO OFFICES 

MAJESTIC THEATRE BUILDING 



MAJESTIC (Lyman B. Glover, mgr. ; agent, 
Orpheum Circuit).— Ed. Wynn (Wynn and 
Russon) is the laughing hit of the bill this 
week. Florence Roberts, called the Pacific 
Coast Mrs. Flske, Is seen In a semi-problem 

Elaylet called "The Woman Intervenes," by I. 
[artley Manners. It Is a clean-cut act, well 
presented and well worth while. Miss Rob- 
erts Is assisted by Charles Wyngate, Tom Ma- 
gulre and^C. J. Harvey. Adelaide Norwood, 



third local* vaudeville appearance within s 
year, is offering her we.i-known repertoire. 
Her operatic selections are given with mucb 
gusto and she wears stunning gowns. Char- 
ley Grapewln, assisted by Anna Cbance and 
others Is seen in "The Awakening of Mr. 
Plpp." The old act is going with a swing 
that lots of new acts- fall to achieve. Wil- 
son's Circus offers some good fooling and is 
neatly presented, while Hopkins and Axtell 




When onrumring oOverUtemenu Mntfly mention VARIETY 



VARIETY 




FIVE 




New Singing and Dancing Numbers 

In a New Variety Farce " 

HAMMERSTEIN'S NEXT WEEK (Oct. 7) 



The Well Known "SULLY FAMILY" 



IN 



ION 



Special Scenery and Effects 

IUREAU" 

Direction of ALF. WILTON 



gain some fair results In their tinkling trav- 
esty called 'Traveling." A. Seymour Brown 
Is singing his own son^s. Some are good 
land some not quite so good. Bert Grant 
at the piano helps out considerably In mak- 
ing the act interesting. One of the best soukb 
ottered is "Election Day in Jungle Town." The 
Vassar girls, with good wardrobe and many 
musical Instruments close the show. They are 
a welcome change from the regulation acro- 
batic act. The Aerial Bartletts open the bill, 
offering the usual line of acrobatic gymnastics 
and elicit considerable appause. The bill Is 
diversified and pretty well balanced. 

REED. 



PALACE (Mort Singer, mgr. • agent, Orphe- 
um Circuit).— A good bill, in fact, the very 
best that has appeared at the new house 
since Its In eptlon, is playing to unusually 
good business at the Palace this ween., hu i 
Ithis despite the fact that nothing In the 
way of a billion dollar name Is being exploited 
as a headllner. Without the aid of a nro- 
gram to Jolt one's memory, the first thing 
that cornea to mind Is the little skit offered by 
Agnes Scott and Henrv Keane. "Drifting" Is 
Its title and of the thousand odd sketches that 
have come along this way In the past decade 
"Drifting" monopolises the honors for general 
progressiveness. In the way of a sketch, it 
seems a century ahead of the times. "Drift- 
ing" pleased the Palace patrons from cellar 
to roof. The bill opened with the De Vole 
Trio athletes, whose beet work went unap- 
preciated because of the small early attend- 
ance. Stein, Hume and Thomas held second 
notch, scoring heavily with some pooular num- 
bers. With a medley of parodied r ratlc 
airs, the trio cornered a big hit and in a 
lower spot might have walked off with the 
afternoon honors. It's one of the beet singing 
trios the house has carried to date. Ed Blon- 
dell and his familiar "Lost Boy" made them 
laugh quite as hearty as they usually do. And 
then came the mysterious Girl From Milwau- 
kee, who did very well, after which "Drift- 
ing" drifted past to make way for the ap- 
plause hit of the matinee, Froslnl and his 
accordeon. Lolo, the mystic, Bomewhat ahead 
of the stereotyped tiresome mind reader gave 
a splendid entertainment Thurber and Mad- 
ison started off rather slowly but finally ac- 
complished what was hitherto thought Im- 
possible. They pulled a big hit in "one" 
Edward's "Kid Kabaref closed to a full- 
' seated house. WYNN. 

Belle Carmen, formerly of the Carmen Sis- 
ters and Jack Clfton, have formed a vaude- 
ville partnership. 

The Lyceum, Duluth, heretofore a combi- 
nation house, will hereafter devote half the 



** SURE-FIRE PARODIES 

™* BY 



'WAITING FOR THE BOBT E. 

-THAT MBtAOW MELODY" 

"I WANT TO BE IN DIXIE" 

"EVERYBODY'* DOING IT" 

Mailed ape* seeetnt of 9B.00. 

Tom Murray, to Court St., 

Union Course, L. I.. N. Y. 

Permanent A4 



SOPHIE 



MYRTLE 



FRANKS SISTERS 

"Two Girls off Color" Always Working 

Direction, MAX OBERNDORF. 



JACOBS 
THEATRE 

(FWBsEUY THE COLUMBIA) 

Cor. Washington and Marshall Sts. 
NEWARK. N. J. 

Seating capacity, 1.S00. Theatre In 
Arat-elaes condition. Will entertain leae- 
lng theatre or Installing good popular 
price stock company. 

Apply, GEO. W. JACOIS. Manager 



week to tabloid music comedies, the other 
half being given to shows. 

A nine pound boy arrived at the home of 
Alfred Kelcy last Sunday morning. The en- 
tire family are In the best of health. 



Jeanette Allen has polned Lillian Waterman 
to play the heavy role in her act. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Henderson have been 
engaged by Boyle Wool folk In the tabloid 
edition of 'The Time, the Place and the 
Girl." Mr. Henderson will direct the orchestra 
and Mrs. I.enderson will play the "girl." 



Joe Harris has purchased "The Sweeteet 
Girl in Paris" and Is looking for people. 

Maude Fielding has been engaged as leading 
woman In the act "The Boss of the House." 
This Is the ninth woman tried out In the 
act. 



Adolph Meyer has prepared a tabloid act 
of "East Lynne," and will put it out In a 
short time. Frank Beal will be his stage 
director. 



"The Man of the Hour" will be the bill 
at the Marlowe next week with Louise Rsn- 



The 7th 

Anniversary 

Number 



• 



VSR/MY 

wiLl be published 
in december 



Preferred position for advertisements 
may be secured by ordering now 



•EBP* 



F "8Stv HD CHINESE TEXAS TOMMY DANCERS 



IN THE 
WORLD 



Pronounced hit at Keith's Bronx Theatre hut week. Of the "Night Follies of San Fran- 
cisco " Criticism— "A native Chinese boy and a cute girl (also a native) do a rather Inter- 
esting "Turkey Trot." This was the one worth while Incident."— VARIEUY. 

Ilie one and only feature staged by F. CLARENCE RIVERS, Producer, 

241 PARK PLACE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



dolph and Ian MacLaren as leading peo- 
ple. 

Kitty Henry has been engaged as soubret 
with "Casey Jones," the Murray & Mack t»iece 
that Is playing the one-nlghters. 

Rex Adams has returned from St. Louis 
where hs played leading juveniles with the 
Crawiord stock company. 

Ed Smalley Is In the city. He has been 

playing In vaudeville In the south, and U 

laying off on account of an attack of ma- 
laria. 



Virginia Drew with "The Golden Qlrl" last 
season has been engaged by Laballe A- Sher- 
idan for one of their acta. 

"The Climax" is now in rehearsal In Chi- 
cago and will be taken out by Law Larson 
for Joe Weber. 



Roger Johnson, the Indiana tenor, has 
changed his name to Frank Mason and Is do- 
ing a singing act. 

Myrtle Churchill Cuneo, engaged for lead- 
ing business with the Sellg Polyscope people 
has been called to her home in Woodstock. 111., 
through the serious sickness of her father. 

Colonial William Lavelle Is considering an 
offer to go to Australia with a wild west act. 

Dan Kusel has) written a new act called 
"The Alderman" which will be produced by 
Marvin * Kettering. George Fee has been 
engaged for the title role. 



Will M. Hough, who assisted Fred Dona- 
ghey In writing the book of "The Girl at 
the Gate," now at the La Salle, Is recover- 
ing from a serious nervous spell at his home 
In White Lake, Mich. 

Charles J. Thannhausen, of the Colonial 
theatre box office, and Josephine Baits were 
married Sept. 25 at Our Lady of Lourdes 
Church, on the north side. A big reception 
followed at Ravenswood Hall. The couple 
are temporarily at the Sherman House. 

Leo Seltxer, formerly manaser of Lake 
Woods Park, Gary. Ind., Is in Chicago. He 
will probably devote himself to the motion 
picture game during the wi ter. 

Knox Wilson has gone to New York. He 
is looking after « new act suitable for the 
big time. Wilson was picked for the road 
company of "A Modern Eve," but balked 
when shown a route of one-nlghters. 



McKay and Cantwell will in all probabil- 
ity be In the cast of "Autoliebchen" or "The 
Widow's Honeymoon," the new Mort Singer 
attraction now in preparation. The offering 
is to be ready late In November or early In 
December. 



J. R. Lnughlln. formerly of St. Iy>uls. h*« 
been r.ppolred chief of th > box office staff 
at the American Music Hall. Ben Lou In, 
formerly of the Alhambra In Chicago, Is hi* 
assistant. 



Murray Fell returned to New York last 
Sunday, after looking around Chicago for 
several days in search of desirable attrac- 
tions for the east. Fell during his visit 
here headquartered in the off! re of J. C 
Matthews. 



Albert Perry, for a long time In the box 
office at the Illinois, has been made busi- 
ness manager of the Fine Arts, theatre 
which opened Monday night. 



Marian Roddy, who has been singing the 
role of the Baroness in "A Modern Eve" 
at the Princess, has Joined the road com- 



■ETUB1ING FstOsi COAST 
12th WEEK OF BIO SUCCESS ON ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

WM. RAYNORE, VIOLA KEENE 

AND COMPANY 

Next week (Oct .6), ORPHEUM THEATRE, OMAHA, NEB. 

N. B. Watch for New Act to be Produced Shortly 

Direction, FLOYD W. STOKER, Putnam Building Now York 



When answering advertisement* kindly nuntion V..RIETY. 



X 



VARIETY 



The Biggest Box-Off ice Attraction In Vaudeville! 



A Headline Act! 





[Himself] 



Creator of "MUTT" and "JEFF 



ft 



This Week (Sept. 30) Orpheum Theatre, Brooklyn 



JULES RUBY, Representative 



pany and will sing the chief female role In 
the piece for the next two w#eks. 

Flchtelberg A Sellg, originators of small 
burlesque Chicago, have opened the Chi- 

cago theatre, State and Harrison streets, at 
a considerable expense in fitting the house 
up. Harry Sefton and Sam Goldman will be 
the chief entertainers. 



Addph Richards Is In "The Military Maid." 
now at the American Music Hall. He suc- 
ceeds Earl Santley. 



Sad e Kusell haB broken in a new vaude- 
ville sketch written for her by her brother, 
Dan Kusell, and entitled "No 1» 



Georgia Cunningham, the soubret with 
"The Dandy GIi-Ib" show playing the Gay- 
ety, Minneapolis, was taken suddenly 111 last 
week with heart trouble and was forced to 
leave at once for her home In Montreal. 



and Warner did fairly well with their mu- 
sical turn. The La Maze Trio was forced 
to cancel, the edge of a faing tabe Injuring 
the toe of one of the artists. In the hod- 
over 1st are Hawley and Co., Annie Kent and 
Nat Wills, a formidable trio. 

EMPRESS (Sulllvan-Consldlne, gen. mgrs.. 
agents, direct ) .—"The Incubator Girls," with 
Gertrude Des Roches and six misses, put over 
a pleasing act. Quick comedy and snappy 
songs combined to keep audience In merry 
mood. Dema Cooper and Co. T>»esented "The 
Confession." The act haa a trite plot, pleas- 
ingly handled. Miss Cooper, an Australian 
emotional actress, was well liked in princi- 
pal role. The Arlon Quartet revealed a set 
of capable singers and specialists. Joe Mc- 
Gee was fairly wel received. Wallace's Cocka- 
toos proved most entertaining, the birds per- 
forming the usual tricks. Berry and Berry 
scored with their music and encores were in 
demand. Robert Hayes and Mabel Hughes ex- 
hibited good dancing form but didn't register 
such an impression with their voices. 



the propor preparation of the play and re- 
luctantly decided not to attempt It. 



AI Lee, who was operated on two weeks 
ago for appendicitis, will be on his feet 
shortly. He will Join Herbert Ashley In 
Salt Lake In five weeks. 



BELASCO (Oliver Morosco. mgr.).— Dra- 
matic stock. Current, Marguerite Leslie and 
Orrln Johnson In "The Gamblers." 

LYCEUM (E. A. Fischer, mgr.).— Dark. 

ADOLPHUS (Workman A Sturm, mgrs.).— 
Stock burlesque. 

PRINCESS (Geo. B. Ryan, mgr.).— Stock 
burlesque. 



Burnett Franklin, press agent of the Cort 
theatre and well known as a magalne con- 
tributor, eloped to San Rafael last week with 
Virginia Dare and broke the news of the 
wedding to Papa Dare by telephone. Miss 
Dare is a girl of unusual beauty. She is a 
daughter of John T. Dare, formerly ap- 
praiser of the port here and now a prac- 
ticing attorney. 



Waldemar Young, dramatic critic of the 
San Francisco Chronicle and one of the most 
prominent of local clubmen, was married 
last week to Mrs. Bessie Strong, formerly a 
writer on the newspapers here. 



A report was current here a few days ago 
that a representative of one of the vaude- 
ville circuits was In town negotiating with 
President Edward Majer of the company that 
is erecting the new pleasure pier at Venice, 
with a view of arranging for the construc- 
tion of a variety theatre there this winter. 

Curtis E. Little, for fourteen years with 
the advance brigade of the Barnum and 
Bailey Circus, quit the No. 1 car here and 
le the advertising agent of the house. 



Cooke and Keene are now billed as the 




THREE WHITE KUHNS 

are now at the MAJESTIC CAFE, Philadelphia, having beenJfengagecTby Mr. Berl Segal, the 
Majestic's proprietor, for the entire winter. Mr. Segal will spend |#3000 advertising the 
THREE WHITE KUHNS. The THREE WHITE KUHNS after making the longest run ever 
known in Atlantic City finished at the Jackson Cafe where they were one, long, continu- 
ous sensation for 22 weeks, beginning May 2 last. 



"A Polish Wedding" current at Cohan's 
Grand Opera House will go to Boston next 
week. 



Louise Randolph and Ian MacLaren, with 
their stock company, now at the Marlowe, 
are booked to play "Maternity" at the "Ine 
Arts theatre later In th season. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

By AL. C. JOY. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.; agent, 
direct.).— Alexander Helnemann, the German 
lleder Blnger. warbled the songs of his fader- 
land in great shape but there was a woeful 
lack of appreciation, said absence of marked 
applause perhaps indicating Helnemann's pro- 
gram Is too classical or foreign for vaudeville 
out here. Owen McGlveney, with his protean 
offering, "Bill Slkes," commanded the closest 
attention throughout and his versatile char- 
acter work scored an emphatic hit. Claude 
and Fannie UsherB put over their sketch 
well. The Ushers were here two years ago 
and were welcomed on their return. William 5 ' 



Photo by Harper Smith 



PANT AGES (Alex. Pantages, gen. mgr.; 
agent, direct).— "An Evening in Hawaii.' 
which smacks of the atmosphere of the Isl- 
ands, made a decided Impression. There Is 
tropical scenery and the songs are of the 
dreamy sort that hit. Lloyd Childs, man- 
ager, exhibited an Interesting reel of pic- 
tures showing the beauty of Hawaii. Ned 
Burton assisted by Norbert Myles and Marion 
•Ford, presented a tabloid skit carrying clever 
lines and songs. The Orpheum Comedy Four, 

food singers, were heard in taking songs 
uggllng Jewels offered a conventional act In 
modern guise, fairly well received. The Mack 
Brothers passed on tne music Fa«g and I) v. 
on. burnt cork boys, chalked up a hit with 
refreshing humor and funmaklng. The La 
Veres gave satisfaction. 

James K. Hackett has postponed his pro- 
duction of "Othello" at the Hearst Greek 
theatre, University of California, one whole 
year. He was Invited by Prof. W. I). 
Armes, chairman of the Musical and Dra- 
matic Committee of the University, to give 
the presentation this month. He at once 
started his company to studying and wired 
east for a rearrangement of his dates. But 
he concluded that the time was too short for 



REGARDS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS IN THE PROFESSION 



LOS ANGELES 



ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; 
agent, direct).— Week 23. Maud Odelle A 
Co., playlet capably acted; Elsa Ruegger, ar- 
tistic; Ed Hayes A Co., big hit; Grace Cam- 
eron, encored ; Bounding Pattersons. Hold- 
overs: DeWltt, Burns A Tprrence, Cesare 
Nesl, Van Brothers. Business good. 

DMPRESS (Dean B. Worley, mgr.. agent, 
S. A C.).— Week 23 (Granto A Maud, clever; 
Manley A Walsh, fair; Helen Primrose, 
pleased; "House Boat Party," seen lg ally pre- 
tentious; Lee Fung Foo, hit of bill; Onalp, 
mystifying. Capacity business. 

CENTURY (A. A M. Loewen, mgrs.; agent, 
Bert Levey).— Week 23. Collins A Elliott, 
fair; Ross A Dale, entertaining; Bryce Ho- 
watson A Co., Interesting; Wilbur A Har- 
rington, applauded; Rosa A Burke, success- 
ful ; Musical Bentleys, the feature. Fair 
business. 

MAJESTIC (Oliver Morosco, mgr.; Shu- 
berts).— Current, Ralney African Hunt Pic- 
tures. 

BURBANK (Oliver Morosco, mgr.).— Dra- 
matic stock. Current, Laurette Taylor In 
"Barbaraza." 



leading comedy burlesque pair at the Prin- 
cess Instead of the former team of Gilbert 
and Keene. 



A policy of retrenchment is In evidence at 
the Century, where a bill of six acts was 
presented last week, with motion pictures, 
Instead of seven acts. The newspaper, lobby 
and billboard displays announce "Century 
road show No. 1," with "nine extraordinary 
big attractions." 



Louis B. Jacobs, under whose personal 
management the old Olympic was run, has 
returned to San Francisco. He talks of a 
plan of Invading the Orient with a musical 
ehow In conjunction with Charles Alphln, 
recently producer for "Pop" Fischer at the 
Lyceum. 



It Is announced that Immediately following 
the present engagement of Laurette Taylor 
In "Barbaraza" at the Burbank. Manager 
Morosco will produce there "A Dollar Did 
It," a new play which he secured recently 
In New York City. Miss Taylor Is to open 
a few weeks hence on Broadway In her 
Burbank success of a few weeks ago, "Peg 
o' My Heart." Coincident with this an- 



JOCK 



MCKAY 



HELD OVER FOR SECOND WEEK AT PROCTOR'S FIFTH AVENUE 

FOR NO REASON WHAT EVER 

Direction, 

When anavvring advertisements kindly mention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



NOW LOCATED AT 



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MUSIC PUBLISHERS 



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"YOU'RE MY BABY" 



BY BROWN A AYER 






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"ON A BEAUTIFUL NIGHT WITH A BEAUTIFUL GIRL" 



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"BE MY LITTLE BABY BUMBLE BEE" 

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WATCH FOR OUR NEW ONES IN PREPARATION 

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Y IN 



JEROME H. REMICK & CO. 



68 Library Avenue 
Detroit 



MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

219 West 46th Street, New York 

MOSE GUMBLE, Manager Professional Department 



Majestic Theatre Bldg 
Chicago 



When atiswifinii <uli rrfisn. mfs in,,ii>i ■„• ■> <>n VARIETY. 



2* 



VARIETY 




nouncement comes the Information that 
Ralph Stuart, leading man a few years ago 
at tbe Burbank with his own company, may 
be Miss Taylor's star. Miss Taylor may 
give Angelenos a short peep at another Man- 
ners play, "The Wooing of Eve." which she 
appeared in a few weeks ago at the Alcazar 
In San Francisco. 



Maud Odelle and company, now In their 
second week here at the Orpheum, are suit 
etituting for Frank Milton, who Is HI, and 
tbe DeLong Sisters. 



William Ervast, treasurer at the Burbank, 
celebrated bis thirty-eighth birthday anni- 
versary on September 10. 

The change In the general management of 
the Edendnle plant of the Sellg Polyscope 
Co., near here, from Jamcfs I* McOee to 
Thomas S. Nash, from Chicago. Is reported 
to have resulted in a brisk clash. The de- 
parting McGee Is eald to have received a 
"lacing" from E. H. Phllbrook, bookkeeper, 
actor and camera man about tbe place. 

Marjorle Rambeau. well known and pop- 
ular here as a leading woman, waa married 
last week In Pocatello, Idaho, to Willard 
Mack, stock actor and manager at the Co- 
lonial theatre in Salt Lake City, who re- 
cently secured a divorce from Maude Leone. 
As a result of her matrimonial venture Mlsa 
Rambeau Is said to have canceled her con- 
tract with Henry W. Savage to play the lead 
In his road company of "Every woman." 

Following her Coast engagements for Oli- 
ver Morosco, Marguerite Leslie, co-star at 
the Belasco. will be seen In the role of 
Noellne in an American production of "The 
Amazons," under the direction of Charles 
Frohman. All this, too, after the auto- 
graph of the English actress was supposed 
to be subscribed to a long-term Morosco 
contract. 



IM 

BILLY RUTH 

MORTON and WAYNE 

— IN — 

A Neat-Classy-up-to-dale 

OFFERING 

Beautiful Wardrobe 



Frank C. Egan, director general of the" 
Egan School of Acting In this city, has con- 
tracted with a moving picture concern tn 
New York City to direct, etoge and produce 
half a dozen photo-plays every week. 

Arrangements have been completed between 
the Globe Amusement Company and the Hunt- 
ington La,nd and Improvement Company 
whereby the former concern Is to have a 
long-term lease on a vaudeville and motion 
picture theatre that the Huntington people 
propose to build at Broadway and Workman 
street, this city. When completed this will 
be known as Globe No. 8. It Is to be a 
modern class C structure, with a seating 
capacity of 800. 

James K. Hackett is reported to have ac- 
cepted "The Last Godfather." the new play 
by Peter Kyne. novelist, and Frank Morse, 
San Francisco newspaper man, and there is 
some alk around the Mason Opera House 
of putting the piece on there for next week 
during the engagement of "The Grain of 
Duat." 



1st ^m WC 2d 

AMERICAN GREELEY SQ. 

New York City 



Another Moros?o-Blackwood announcement 
is that Bessie Barriscale, who plays the part 
of Launa in "The Bird of Paradise," has 
signed a Morosco contract for five years. 

It is understood that the Hudson theatre is 
to be the scene of Muriel Starr's endeavors 
when she reaches New York. "The Indiscre- 
tion of Truth," by J. Hartley Manners, is to 
be the play. The author Is scheduled to 
leave here October 14. 



Henry Oblmeyer. bandmaster, has gone to 
Philadelphia to fix his contracts for next 
season's engagement at Willow Grove Park. 
Director Oblmeyer is spoken of as the likely 
chief bandmaster at the Panama Fair In 
1915. 



The first attraction at the Majestic, follow- 
ing the present engagement of the Ralney 
African Hunt Pictures, will be Comedian 
George Damerel in Mort Singer's last sea- 
son's success, "The Heartbreakers." 



The signature of Henry Stanford, well- 
known member of tbe Burbank .stock com- 
pany, is reported to have been subscribed to 
a three-year contract ivlth David Belasco. 

The Morosco-Blackwood offices report the 
following engagements for this city : Gaston 
Mcrvale, an English actor, or the Belasco 
theatre company; Walter Edwards, seen here 
laBt season at the Majestic as Laylock In "The 
Deep Purple"; Richard Allen, anotner "sec* 
ond man,' 'and Clone Migrant*. 



at 



. A. LEMBECK and 
LIONEL LAWRENCE 

PRODUCE 

MAH LADY LOU 

By Howard McKent's Romance of the South Playing 



■■ 



Now that the services of Muriel Starr are 
not needed at the Lyceum In "The Home 
Plate," her early departure for New York 
Is expected. 



MAKE YOUR NECK AND ARMS BEAUTIFUL 

SURATT'S FLESH WHITENER E C 2SLEJ3K' 

A liquid face powder without an equal. Easy to apply, does not rub off. Dries quickly and 
smoothly. A new Oriental Cream with a fascinating Oriental Perfume. Large bottle or can $.60 
By mail $.60 

Retail Stores Broadway, Cor. 46th Street F. K. JAMES COMPANY, Mamlactarim Chemisfi 

"thSt. (Hotel Astor Branch) 247 West 48th S 



Walter Montague, prominent In San Fran- 
cisco as an author and producer of vaude- 
ville playlets, waa in the cast of "The Hypo- 
crite" at the Orpheum last week. 

Monte Carter, co-star with Jules Mendel at 
the Adolphus. closed there September 28. 
leaving the latter again to be featured alone. 
Carter s future plans are unannounced. 

W. W. Decker Is heralding the advance of 
"The Heartbreakers" this season and waa 
here last week. 

Mary Graham, who was at the Mason last 
week with "Pomander Walk," was formerly 
a member of the Belasco theatre stock com- 
pany in this city. 

A social function on the stage of Pan- 
tages theatre September 20 after the last 
show, celebrated the second anniversary of 
the owner's vaudeville invasion of Los An- 
geles. 

October In the date selected for the 

Sremlere of the new Manners play, "The 
[oney Moon," at the Belasco. 



PHILADELPIA. 

By GEORGE M. YOUNG. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr. ; agent, U. 
B. O. ).— A shift In the running order and a 
little rutting here and there after the first 
show Monday brought this week's bill Into 



MARIKA and CARMEN 



(THE GIRLS FROM FRISCO) 



Sept. 23, Dominion, Ottowa 

This Week (Sept. 30) Orpheum, Montreal 

This Week (Oct. 7) Temple, Hamilton 

Manager, JAMES E. PLUNKETT 



THE BELLMONTES 



Jim Nastic's Classic 

SUNDAY (OCT. 6) , 
COLUMBIA, N. Y. 

Direction C. W. BOSTOCK 



Whm nntvitrtot adiertU*m»*t$ Hti<Hy mention V4fl0TT. 



VARIETY 



N'S 



MAKE-UP 

GUARANTEED 



I IM O 



ALABAMA. 

Auulaton 

J. L. Wlkle 
Birmingham 
E. B. Norton. Drug* 
Jacobs' Pharmacy 
Pharmacy 
Pharmacy 
Drug Co. 



Drugs 



Letaw's 
Oui'i 

Adams 
Mobile 

Van Antwerp's 

Dave s. Ilauer 
Montgomery 

Mattox Drug Stores 
Tuscaloosa 

Bingham Drug Co 

ARIZONA 

Globe 

Palace Drug Co 
Phoenix 

Owl Pharmacy 
Tucson 

Geo. Martin Dg. Co 

ARKANSAS 

Fort Smith 

Palace Drug Store 

Davis Drug Co. 

Caldwell's Dg Store 
Mot Springs 

Morris Drug Co 
lonesboro 

Royal Pharmacy 
Little Ro«k 

Bordeaux's Pharmacy 

Annlstead-Britton Co 

Snodgrss* A Ilracy 
Pine BlulT 

Mixnn-Tunker-lcy Co. 
Texarkana 

Smith Drug Co. 

< U.IKOIIMV 
BaktTsneid 

Baer Bros.. Drugs 
Chlco 

1*9 Pharmacy 
Eureka 

Pacific Pharmacy 
Fresno 

Patterson Block Ph.ir 

Smith Bros. 

Monroe Drug Co 
Long Beach 

Green Crown Drug Co 
Los Angeles 

Chambers Drug Co 

Godfrey A Moore 

Dean Drug Co 

Angelus Pharmacy 

Vance's Drug Store 

Sun Drug Co. 

The Ow| Drug Co. 

Marsclen Drug Co 
Oakland 

The Owl Drug Co. 

,. C Jl a,, \. "offnmo * Co 
Kedlands 

Spoor's Drug Co. 
Riverside 

Neblett Drug' Store 
Sncrsinento 

Neve Drug Co. 
San Bernardino 

The Owl Drug Store 

Towne, Secorabe A 
Allison 
3m Diego 

Plaza Pharmacy 
^ Knllam Drug Co. 
San Francisco 

The Owl Drug Co 

Parent's Stationery 

Goldstein's Malr Store 

Wakelees Pharms. 

No Percentage Drug 

Crown Drug Co. 

B. * S. Drug Co. 

Boerlrke « Kuuyon Co. 
San Jose 

Curtis ft Henkle. Dg. 

Thomas Drug Co. 
Santa Crux 

Palmer Drug Co. 
Stockton 

Holden Drug Co. 
Woodland 

J. V Lei t hold 

C \ \ \ 1> \ 

Bran I ford 

Mrs. I. Bush. Hair Od* 

II. E. Perrott 
Colgsry. Alta. 

Io« Flndlay Drug Co 
Edmonton 

J. F. McCallum 
Fort William 

Clarke Bros. 

W R. Brown 
Halifax. N. S. 

O. A Burbldge 
Hamilton 

I P. Hennessey 
KHowna. B. C 

P. B. Wlllits ft Co 
Kinsston 

M.ihood's Drug Store 
Lcthbridge Alia 

Alberta Drug Co 
I^ondon 

iv L Gulllcmont 
Montreal 

Oliver Dowler 

Sanitary Pharmacy 

^•yer Freeman 

M. Albert 

•I. H. Nault 

Standard Pharmaf) 
Ottawa 

Allen A Cochrane 
Port Arthur 

W. T. McKnchern 
SI John. N. B. 

M V. Paddock 
Sa.-kaioon. Snsk. ' 

A Cainphcll 
BatTH St<\ Marie 

c. T. Adams A Co 
Toronto 

G TiirnMyn. Druga 

J P. Hennessey 

Liggilt's Limited 
Vancouver, B c 

MrDuffe* Bros. A Co. 

Burns tt Cairns 

COLORADO 

Colorado Springs 
Robinson Drug Co 

I 'cnvcr 
Scholia Drug Co. 
George W. Canl 
The Adams Pharmacy 

Pueblo 
Relss Bros.. Drugs 
Metropolitan Dg Co. 

Trinidad 
IVoplc's Drug 8tore 



CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

Hamilton's Pharmacy 

Woman's Drug Store 
Bristol 

W. J. Madden 
Hartford 

The Hapejye Dg. Co 

C. E. Miller. Drugs 

Goodwin's Pharmacy 
Mlddletowu 

Buell ft Blatcbley 
New Britain 

S. P. Storrs 
New Haven 

A F. Woods Sons 
Norwich 

Broadway Pharmacy 
Stamford . 

W. T. Marroh. Drugs 
Waierbury \ 

Dexter ft Co., N Drugs 

Brown Druggists 

IH st. or COL. 

Washington 
Kloczewskl's Pharm. 
Steven's Pharmacy 
Chrlstlanl Drug Co. 
Affleck a Drug Stores 

FLORIDA 

lacksonvllle 

Bettes Pharmacy 

O' Donald Drug Co. 

Kirk's Pharmacy 
St. Auguetlnr 

Jefferson Theatre Phr 
Tampa 

Taylor Drug Store 
GEORGIA 
Albany 

Owl Drug A Seed Co. 
Amerlcus 

Murray k Hooks Pbar. 
Atlanta 

Jacobs Pharmacy Co. 

The Grand Pharmacy 

Elkln Drug Co. 

Cuursey ft Munn 

M. Rich ft Bros Co. 

Cox Prescription Shop 
Augusta 

T. O. Howard. Drugs 
Macon 

Murray ft Sparks Co. 

Tuylor-Bayne Dg. Co 
Savannah 

Livingston's Pharm 

HAWAII 

Honolulu 
Benson, Smith ft Co 

ILLINOIS 

Aurora 

L. N. Benton. Drugs 

Bevler A Harts 
Bloomlngton 

Coblents Drug Co. 

Frey's Drug Store 
Cairo 

P. G. Schuh ft Sons 
Champaign 

H. Swannell ft Son 
Chicago 

G. F. Wisshack Co. 

Central Drug Co. 

Chicago Costume Wks 

Revere Pharmacy 

Congress Drug Co. 

H. M. Moffelt 

Walter H. Krouskup 

A. B. Fechter 

Fritz Schoulti A Co 

Harrison Pharmacy 

Public Drug Co. 

Buck A Raynor 

Consumers' Drug Co 

Oscar 6. Betting 

C. W. Moyer 

The New Pharmacy 

Robert G. Hug 

Home Drug Co. 

Ashland Drug Co. 

Auditorium Pharmacy 

L. J. Bauer 

John J. Samuels 

Crown Pharmacy 

Thayer'a Drug Store 

M. R. Stuart 

llottlnger Drug Co 

lver L. Quale* 

Cameron ft Co.. Cost 

Langerman's Phar. 

G. H. Mayr 

Thos Whitfield ft Co. 

M. A. Train 

Chaldek Bros. 

New. York Cost. Co. 

Meyer Drug ft Truss 

K E. Behlke 

Wleholdt's 

II Reuter. Drugs 

LaSalle Sta. Dg. Store 
Chicago Heights 

Stolte's Drug Store 
Danville 

Lyric Pharmacy 
Decatur 

P. Ewing Sup. House 

Opera House Dg. St 
East St. Louis 

M. Sondag. Drugs 
Elgin 

Economical Drug Co 
Oalerthurg 

J. W Hoover ft Co 
Jot l«t 

Central Drug Co 
Mollne 

Gus Ltndvall 

Jericho's Drug Store 
Monmouth 

Red Cross Pharmacy 
Peoria 

R. D. McDougal. Dgs 

Red Cross Pharmacy 

DeKroyft's Pharm. 
Qulnry 

Heed Bros 
Rorkford 

R«»d Cross Pharmacy 
Springfield 

Sell A Coe. Drug'st* 

Mitchell's Drug Store 

INDIANA 

Anderson 

Central Pharmacy 
Columbus 

Ha user A I'p De Graff 
Elkhart 

Houseworth Bros 
F/vansvllle 

I F. Bomm Drug Co. 
' Rchlaepfer. Drugs 
Fort Wayne 

Meyer Bros. Co. Dgs 

People's Drug StoTe 



Frankfort 

B. B Merntt 
Indianapolis 

Charles W. Blcbroit 

Ferger's Pharmacy 

Weber Drug Co. 

E. W. Siucky. Drugs 

Henry J Huder 
Lafayette 

A. V. Klenly. Drugs 
I^Port e 

C Emmett Trees 
Loganaport 

W. H. Porter A Co. 
Marlon 

The Medicine Shop 
Michigan City 

Obmlng Drug Co. 
Muncle 

Owl Drug Store 
Richmond 

Conkey Drug Co. 
South Bend 

Economical Dg. Store 

Public Drug Store 
Terre Haute 

A. Hers 
AVerttt-Dorsey Drug 

IOWA 

Burlington 

Sutter-Ludman Drug 
Cedar Rapids 

Boyaon Drug Co. 

Emerson's Pharmacy 
Clinton 

James De Lange 
Council Bluffs 

Opera House Phar 
Davenport 

Klstenmacher's Phar. 

O. Schlegel A Son 
Des Moines 

Culberson Cost. Co. 

Leo Miller Drug Co. 

Lloyd Coon Co. 

M. J. Olsen Pharm. 
Dubuque 

T. W. Ruete Drug Co 
Fort Dodge 

Oleson Drug Co. 
Marshalltown 

Belnert Drug Co. 

C. J. Lander 
Mason City 

Brady Drug Co. 
Ottumwa 

w. L. Sargent, Drugs 
Sioux City 

Wm. J. Kllse. Drug* 
Waterloo 

Knapp Drug Co. 

Wangler Bros. Co. 

Taggart Drug Co. 

KANSAS 

Chanute 

Brown Pharmacy Co. 
Coffeyvllle 

Jordan -Florea Dg. Co 
Nichols Drug Co. 
EniDorla . 

W. R. IrWln 
Hutchinson 

llrlggs Bros. 
Iola 

Burrell's Drug Store 
Leavenworth 

Ed. C. Frltsche 
Manhattan 

Palace Drug Co. 
Parsons 

W. C. McKee. Drugs 
Pittsburg 

Roll Llndberg. Drugs 
Topeka 

J. P. Rowley. Drugs 
Wichita 

Higginson Drug Co. 

Dockum Drug Co. 

Means Bros. 

KENTUCKY 
Frankfort 

W. H. Averlll's Sous 
Lexington 

Cooper A Dunn 
Louisville 

Buschcmeyer Bros. 

Taylor Isaacs Dg. Co. 

A. Kuprlon. Costumer 

Newman Drug Co. 

T. P. Taylor A Co 
Owensboro 

Smith A Bates 
Paducah 

Gilbert's Pharmacy 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 

Van A. Woods. Drugs 
Lske Charles 

Von Phul A Gordon 
Monroe 

Monroe Drug Co. 
\"ew Orleans 

Amerlcsn Drug Store 

P. L. Cusachs. Drugs 

A. Micas 

Katz A Besthoff 
Shreveport » 

Soenger Bros.. . Drugs 

Meyer Drug Co. 

Carter Drug Co 
MAINE 
Augusta 

W R. Partridge 
Bangor 

C. A. Fowler, Drugs 
Houlton 

O. P. French A Son 
Lewlsion 

Lesdbetter Dg. Store 
Portland 

A. Carles 

H. H. Hay Sons 
Watervllle 

Geo. A. Daviau 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 
Williamson A Watts 
S. LeRov Robinson 
H. 8. Hartogensls 
Morgan A Millard. Dgs. 
Sonnenburg-Habllston 
Spetzler-Krug Co. 

Cuniberlsnd 
L. L. Kimes A Bro 
.lames K. Ford 

Hagerstown 
Fukle A Young 
Central Drug Co. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 
Klein's Drug Stores 
Green's Pharmacy 
Knight's Pharmacy 
W. B Hunt Co.. Dgs 
Woodward Drug Co 
S A D. Sheppard A Co 



Drug Co 
Drug Co. 

Lyon Co. 
Chaplain Co. 



Pharmacy 



Dk 



Epstein 

Jaynes 
Brockton 

Hall A 

W A 
Fall' River 

Touhey's. 
Gloucester 

M. L. Wetherell. 
Hsverhlll 

Hall A Lyon Co 
Holyoke 

George F O'Connor 
Lowell 

Carleton A Hovey 

Carter A Sherburne 
Lynn 

J. M. Nelson, Drug 
New Bedford 

The Browne Pharm 
Northampton 

Wlswell. Druggist 

Coburn A Graves 
PlttsAeld 

Union Drug Co. 
3. Pramlngham 

Waverly Drug Co 
Springfield 

J. D. Smith 
W^stfleld 

Edward G. Crotty 
Worcester 

Green. The Druggist 
Scott A Son 
Hall ft Lyon Co. 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor 
Eherbach ft Son 

Battle Creek 
Baker-Jones Co. 

Bay City 
Mason A Beach 

Detroit 
Mrs. Clara M. 
Standard Drug 
E. C. KUisel, Drugs 
Gray A Worcester 
Wm. W.FIero. Drugs 
Whitney Costume Co. 
Mrs. >R. W. Allen 
Hall's Pharmacy 

Flint 
C. B. Crampton 

Grand Rapids 
Peck Bros. Drug Co 
Schrouder's Dg. Store 
West's Drug Stores 

Jackson 
Athsneum Pharmacy 
White's Drug Store 



Co. 



Head 
Store 



Wlnooa 

Edwin A. Brown 
MISSISSIPPI 

Meridian 

Staple Pharmacy 
VI ksburg 

King A Co.. Drugs 
MISSOURI 
Brookfleld 

Chas. Green 
Columbia 

Columbia Drug Co. 
loplln* 

the Cooper Drug Co. 
Kansas City 

Midland Pharmacy 

Orpbeura Pharmacy 

Owl Drug Co. 

Fvdcrmann s Drug 

Central Pharmacy 

Club Pharmacy 

Goldblatt Bros. 
St. Joseph 

St. Joseph Drug Co 

SoDer's Pharmacy 
St Lou 1 * " 

R. Schmidt. Costumer 

Anti-Monopoly Drug 

Enderle Drug Co. 

A. Fueger. Wigs 
Judge A Dolpb, Dgs. 
City Hall Drug Store 
Mra. L, Slverllng 

B. Kstzky Drug Co. 
Central Drug Co. 
Grand-Laclede Drug 
Wolff-Wilson Co. 
Wtlpert Drug Co. 
Regent Pharmacy 

H. A. Kuns 
sedalla 

Scot ten Drug Co. 
Springfield 

C. II. Dalrymple 

Montana 

Billings 

Lee Warren, Drugs 
Bozcman 

Roae Drug Go. 
Butte 

Colbert Drug Co. 

Carney's Pharmacy 
Great Falls 

Model Pharmacy 
Helena 

Parchen Drug Co. 
Livingston 

Seaman's Pharmacy 
Missoula 

Missoula Drug Co. 



Rlker ft Sons Co. 

Menk's Pharmacy 

Creacent Drug Store 

L. Bamberger A Co 
New Brunswick 

Van Duersen Pharm 

Moulgan s Pharmacy 

Mllier.. Drug Store 
Orange 

James C. Hakes 
Paaaalc 

Carroll Drug Co. 
Peterson 

Llggett's 

Samuel Sykes 

James L. Smart 

P. W. Bowne 
Perth A in boy 

Lauer Drug Co 
Trenton 

Chas. Stuckert 

Riker's Drug Store 
Wlldwood 

Major's Pharmacy 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Warner Drug Co. 

Wm. Sautter Co 

Morris Drug Co. 

Louis Sautter 
Amsterdam 

Wm. Wilson, Jr 

Auburn 
A. B. Adams. Drugs 
Osborne House Phar 
Chas. H. Sagsr Co. 

Blnghamton 
Wsldron Drug Co. 

Brooklyn 
Block Drug Co. 
E. J. Morrlssey 
Theo. H. Boblk 
R. Burkbardt 
M. O. Kantrowltz 
Theo. H. Sommers 
Riker's Drug Stores 
I. Schlossberg 
Cbaa. P. Goerrlg 
A. B. Lawrene, Co- 1 
Alex. Gardner 

Buffalo 
Central Preacrlption 
Glbb's Drug Store 
Llggett's 

Potter-Buescher Co. 
Rudln's Drug Store 
Heegaard- Sloan Co. 
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ALPINR COLD CREAM 

Pound Carta. 75c Halves. 40c. Jars. ISc. Tubes. 10c. 

KNICKERBOCKER COLD CREAM 

Potind Cune, 60c. Halves, 25c. 



MILL'S BURNT CORK 

Large. 75c. Medium. 40c. Small, 26c 

WHRATCROFT 

40c. Bottle or Tin. 

PACE POWDEH 

Half-Pound Cans, SOc. 

Quarter*, SOc. 
BLACK-EYE I'tlM 
Complete with Puff, 23c. 



GREASE PAINT 

25c. Stick In Cardboard Tubes. 

LINING COLORS 

l. r .c. stick In Cardboard Tubea. 

MOIST ROUGE 

Light. Medium. Dark, 25c. each. 

CREOLE ROUGE 

20c. Box. 



TOOTH ENAMEL 

26c. Bottle. 

MEXICOLA ROUGE 

SOc. Box. 

BLACK WAX 

20c. Box. 

EYEBROW PENCILS 

10c. Each. 

MASCARO 

Box with Mirror. 40c. 



ASSORTED PAINTS 

60c. Tin Box. 

CLOWN WHITE 

Tin Box. 26c. 

>OSE PUTTY 

20c. Box. 

LIP STICK 

15c. Metal Tube. 

CREOLE CORK 

76c. Large Tin. 



TOUPEE WAX 

20c. Tin Box. 

NO. IM ROUGE 

SOc. Box. 

SPIRIT GUM 

15c. Hot., with Brush 

COSMETIC 

15c. Tin Tube. 

LIQUID ROCGE 

20c. per Bottle. 



■■ I m i •» THE M. STEIN COSMETIC CO., New York 



Kalamaxoo 

Rollins Bros. 

J. L. Wallace. Drugs 
Lansing 

Robinson Drug Store 

Rouser'a Drug Store 
Manistee 

City Drug Store 
Muskegon 

Fred Brundage, Dgs 
Port Huron 

Knill'a Drug Store 

J. Lohrstorfer 
Saginaw 

Marwlnske A Loebrich . 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Fred R. Price, Druga 
Traverse City 

B. E. Miller ft Son 

MINNESOTA 

Austin 

K. O. Wold 
Crookston 

Yeo's Drug Store 

Dulutb 
Mattlx Drug Stores 
Wlrth's Drug Store 
A. B. Swedberg 

Msnksto 
John J. Lamm 

Minneapolis 
A D Thompson Drug Co 
Charles H. Clrkler 
Voegell Bros. Dg. Co. 
Owl Drug Store 
Smkth Costume Co. 
Brownlee Drug Co. 
Metropolitan Drug 
Public Drug Co. 

Owatonna 
J. B. Chrletgau 

Red Wing 
Kuhn's Drug Store 

St Paul 
Martin Olesen 
A. T. Hall. Drugs 
F M. Parker A Co. 
Cl'y Drug 8tore 
It. A Becker A Son 
Chas. T. Heller 
Mansur Drug Co. 

Stillwater 
Brenner Drug Co. 



NEBRASKA 

Beatrice 

Beck A Bullls 
Fremont 

Pohl'a Pbsrmacy 
Grsnd Island 

Clayton Pharmacy 
Lincoln 

Rlggs Pharmacy Co. 

Meier Drug Co. 
North Platte 

Stone Drug Co 
Omaha 

Sherman A MrConnell 

Beaton Drug Co. 

Theo. Lleben A Son 

Unltt-Docekal Co. 

Myers-Dillon Co. 

Owl Drug Co. 

Haines Drug Co. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

llerlin 

Cournoyer Pharmacy 
Manchester 

O. L. Glguere. Drugs 
Nashua 

Central Pharmacy 

NEW JERSEY 

Asbury Park 

Maltlson Ave. Pharm. 
Atlantic City 

Apollo Pharmacy 
Rayonne 

BIJou Pharmacy 

Opera House Dg. S». 
Csmden 

Litchfield's Pharma y 
Dover 

Thomas K. Edwards 
Edgewater 

E<lg»water Pharmacy 
Elizabeth 

Graham A McCloskey 

Mackey Broa. 
Hoboken 

Wm. Kamlah 
Jrrsey City 

Hartiuti Drug Co 

F. O. Schaefer 

Lauer Drug Co. 

Megeman A Co. 

Newark 
Firemen's Phar Co 
Chas Holzbauer 



ll.irty Dolrn 
Dorb Drug Co 
Hvhaaf Bros. 
Kdward Fuehrer 

Caswell -M»sm.) I'u 
i '.i.i n Drug Co. 
J. W. Ketil I 'o 

L. A O. Goldlust 
A. Ballzley 
Alex. Hudnut's Phar. 
Paul Borchad 
Liggett'*. Drug Store 
Drlesen s Pharmacy 
Niagara Falls 

Drug Store 



Medfonl 

Li Oil II II. l kin Dg 

I'ortliMiil 
I'lim i s & Bates 
Wooii» ii. Clnrke *. ■ 'o 
Rows K- Martin 
Skldmors Drag <'o 



Bnvks A Son 
Drug Co. 
Eltinge 



Brothers A Co. 

Phsrmary 
Burt 



Drug Co. 
Drugs 



Coney Island 

Edward A. Ancelin 

A Kamenetsky 
Elmlra 

Tcrbell-CalklnsCo 

Colvln A Ingraham 

Gerlty Bros. Drug Co 
Klshklll-on lliid-on 

l-oughrun's Phami.i y 
(jlens Fall* 

Bert 11. Bentley. Dgs 
Ginverevllle 

Windsor Pharmacy 
Ithaca 

Arthur B 
Jamestown 

Swanson 
Kingston 

Wm. S. 
Little Falls 

O'Rourke A Hurley 
Lockport 

Itayllss A Sweet 
Mecbanlcvllle 

N. T. Van Rensselaer 
Mlddletown 

Mi Monagle A Rogers 
Mt. Vernon 

Ankerson's Pharmacy 
Newburgh 

Merrlit's Sons' 
New Rinhelle 

N. J Patterson 
New York 

Knickerbocker Phar. 

Clhiiin the Drugglxt 

liegeman A Co 

Wm. B. Rlker A Sons 

Circle Pharmacy 

James' Drug Stores 
John W. Ferrler 
Geo. Shindhelm. WIk 
Polk's Pharmacy 

A. H. Mcltae A Co 

t'liitel I>rug Stores 
Krause A Co. 

Penn. Sta. Drug Co 
llalper Bros. 
S llol/.man. Ph C. 
Cody * liergrr 
<;rlfil'li i Pharmary 

i: T F.tnelln 

Collins' I'liarmacy 
, Sayer Drug Co. 

».' A !!•■!; • I. ll 111 



Croy's 
Oloan 

F. It. 
f )swego 

Butler 

M. R. 
Poughkeepsle 

McCullocb's 
Rochester 

B. M. Hyde 
Dake Drug 
Paine Drug 
Kline A Co. 

Rome 

Brougbton 
Schenectady 

W. H. Quinn, 
Syracuse 

Stols Bros., Drugs 

Bunker A Plum 

Llggett's 4 Stores 

F. J. Nye. Drugs 
Tarrytown 

Russell A Lawrie 
Troy 

John F. Killllea 

Knowlson A Co. 
Utlca 

. Sullivan A Slauson 
Wutertown 

C. D. Tryon. Drugs 
White Plains 

Ballard Drug Co. 
Yonkers 
liegeman A Co. 

N. CAROLINA 

Ashevllle 

Smith's Drug Store 
Charlotto 

Woodsll A Sheppar.l 
Raleigh 

Wake Drug Store 
Wilmington 

Bunting Drug Co 

Hanover Drug Co. 
Wilson 

Turlington A Moore 
Wlnston-S.ilem 

P. A. Thompson 

N. DAKOTA 

Fargo 

Broadway Pharmacy 
Grand Forks 

John H Void 

OHIO 

Akron 

The Harper 
Alliance 

Vale. The Drug 
Cambridge 

Brenan A Wilson 
Canton 

Bolcndcr's Pharmacy 

Roth A Hug Co. 
Cincinnati 

Weatherhead Pbar. 

Voss A Lakamp 

Mi C. Dow, Drugs 

J. C. Krleger's Sons 

Theo. Rosenthal 
Cleveland 

W. G Marshall 

W. Krause A Son 

Standard Drug Co 

The Prospect Pharm. 

Gii-lm A Sclxcr Co, 
Columbus 

F. F. Mykrantz 

Kampmann Costume 

May Orug Co. 

Llggett's 

Mebs Drug Co. 
Dayton 

Burkltt'a Drug Store. 
E. Liverpool 

Jesso D. Hot low ay 
Elyrta 

C. W. Phillips 
Hamilton 

Radcllffe Drug Co. 
Lima 

Central Drug Store 

H. F. Vortkamp 

Kriteriirlse Drg. Store 
Newark 

T. J. Evans 

W A. Ermuu A Sou 
Portsmouth 

Fisher A Strelch Ph 
Sidney 

A. 1 While's Phann. 
Springfield 

H. J churihman 

Westle's Cut Hale Dgs. 

Adam Si hmldt. Dgs. 
SieuhenvUle 

i) B. Pierce A Co. 
Toledo 

West Drug Store 

Boody House Phar 
Youngstown 

Stahl's Drug Store 

Zsiiesvllle 

Balrd'a Pharmacy 



Drug Co. 
Man 



l.i i. ml Drug Co. 
Salem 
c ipcr.i H"U i Phar 

PRKTNSYIA \\l \ 

Allegheny 

Tin- May DruK C« 
Allentown 
Paiaie Pharmacy 

H. L. Kelper 

H E. Peters* < 
Alioona 

Boeeking ft Meredith 
Brad dock 

W. A. Kul;i. Drugs 
Butler 

The Crystal Pharmacy* 
Easlon 

A. J. Odeuwelder 
Erie 

Adams A Streuber 

Frank L. Felsler. Dgs 

Andrew's Pharmacy 
Greensburg 

Stephenson Chem. Co 
Harrlsburg 

Gorsjas the Druggist 

J. T. Ensminger 
llazleton 

Rble Pharmacy 
Homestead 

McKee Drug Co. 
Johnstown 

Ball K. Roth. Drugs 

Charles Young 
Lancaster 
Brubaker Brothers 

John H. Miller 
Lebanon 

8. II McOowon 

M Kee>|>ort 

Hiawatha Drug Store 
New Castle 

Love A Megown 
Oil City 
W. K. George. Drugs 

Philadelphia 
11. A. Nolle. Drugs 
Oeo. 11. Evans, Drugs 
Waa • ft Son, Costumer 
Miller Drug Compsuy 
Jacob Bros. 
Ii. L. Il..i.-t A Co 
I'hillp L. Bsilenient 
Itumsey-Bnrell Drug 
F. W. E. 8tedein 
K. J. Kelly A Co. 
Pescock's Phar 
Central Drug Co. 

Pittsburgh 
The May Drug Co. 
Ksser Bros. 
K. K. Heck 
Liberty Drug Co. 
.leiikln's Arcade Phar. 
McKennan Drug Co. 

Plymouth 
G J. Durbln. Drugs 

Reading 
Bam ford A Kemp 
Stein's Pharmacy 
Amer. Medicine Co. 
A. Schalch 
Bell's Drug Store 

S. ran on 
Fahrenholt, Costumer 
Baumelster Pharmacy 
Matthews Bros. 
Kennedy's Mi^l. Store 
lermyn Drug Store 
J. J. Loftus 

Shamokln 

Hollenback A Raker 

Washington 
8. M. Templetou 

W likes- Barrc 

Frank A Barber 
The Metiane Phar. 
Swalnbank Drugs 
W I. Pauling t Co. 

\\ ilkmsburg 
Smith Drug Co. 

Wilttamsport 
Mlllenc-r Drug Co. 
A. B. Hodges 

York 
Helges A Hildebrand 

HIIODE ISLAND 

Newport 

Hall A Lyon Co. 
Pawtucket 

Pisa Drug Co. 
Providence 

Colonist Drug Co. 

J. Fnil Gibson Co. 

Hall A Lyon Co. 
Westerly 

Thomas J Bannon 

Wooil socket 

lit roi hers Bros . Dgs. 



liontinm 

J. W. Peeler Phar 
ana 

Hari>erK« nner Co 
Dallas 

The Ow| Drug Ce 

Shillem A Son- 

Hurrel-oii Co i nine Co. 

M.irvlu's Pharmacy 
Rl Paso 

A B It. van A Co 
Fort Worth 

Lowe a Drug Store 

Covey A Martin 

Itenfro's Pbsrmacy 
Galveston 

Star Drug Store 

I J. Schott 
Houston 

■Rouse's 

Lewyn's Drug Store 

Paul Pharmacy 

The Walker Pbar 
Paris 

Grelner A Mohr 

Mayes- Butcher Phar 
San Antonio 

Wm. C. Kalteyer 

'_N»th Century Phar. 

Fischer's Drug Store 
Sherman 

Oaycroft-Stlnson, 
Who 

Old Corner Drug Co. 
Wichita Falls 

Rexall Drug Store 



AROLI.N \ 

Co. 



llM.tlllillt 
Ardtnore 

City Drug Store 
Clinton 

Red Cro*K Dg. Store 
Dursnt 

Corner Dru« Store 
Enid 

Peerless Drug Stera 
Lawton 

Join. Bro Drug Co 
MeAlester 

K A. I ' inlels, Drug 1 
V ii kogee 

Muskoge Drug Co. 

Civ 'I lung Co. 

Morfiiirt Drug Co 

Card na] Drug Co. 
Oklali'ii .a city 

Wastfall Drug On 

Frank M w»»Hvir 
Tu'sn 

The Ucxall Store 
OREGON 

Woodworth Druj: i 



MM I'll < 

Charleston 

Paragon Drug 
Columbia 

Taylor Drug Co. 

McGregor's Drug Store 

vol Til DAKOTA 

Sioux Falls 
K P. Brows. Drugs 

TUNNESSKK 

cim anooga 

Live y L't Live Drug 
The Peool" ■ Phar. 

10 A i"l< i i.oii 
Knox vil'e 

Ku.iiin.iii' .. Drue 

Drug sioro 

P \ I: 
M ■ 

Win Ka'tcn 

A. Rrnkerl A < o. 

Moseley-Roblnsoa Co. 
Nai livllie 

C It Ha. loin Hair Gils 

Rand A Rumpter Drg. 

I >« .iiu ills i trug p«», 

l< uiiing- Pbar mac y 

Max Lioi.tn ' ^,.i 

TEX \«- 

Au tin 
Van Smith Drug m 

11 C '.I , ou 

Beauno r 
l'ost-0 a Drug 



UTAH 

Ogden 
Utahna Drug Co. 

Salt Lake City 
B. F. Ott Drug Co. 
G T Brke Drug Co 
Halliday Drug Co 
Druebl A Franken 
Schramm -Johnson 
Dayton Drug Co 
Owl Drug Co. 
Wlllea-Horne Dg. Co 

VERMONT 

Bar re 

c II. Kendrlck A Co. 
Brattleboro 

Wilfred F. Root 
Burlington 

Bel I rose Pharmacy 
Rutland 

Ward Drug Store 

VIRGINIA 

Lynchburg 

Central Pharmacy 
Norfolk 

Law Bldg. Pharmacy 

Jordan's Colo. Hotel 

Coote's Pharmacy 
Richmond 

J. Blair. Drugs 

Tragic Drug Co. 

Thos. T. Jeffries 
Roanoke 

It. O. Dalby ft Co 

Keyser-Warren Co. 

Van Lear Bros. 
WASHINGTON 
Bel I Ingham 

Engberg's Pharmacy 

Owl Pharmacy 
Everett 

Dean's Pharmacy 
Hoquktm 

Frank Gillette 
North Yakima 

Clark's Pharmacy 

Pioneer Drug Co. 
Seattle 

Quaker Drug Co. 

Swift's Phsrmacles 

Klnsrl Bros. 

Bsrtell Drug Co. 
Spokane 

Demert Drug Co. 

Watson Drug Co. 

The Rltter Co. 

Club Pharmacy 

Weatern Drug C« 

Mi Nab Drug Co. 

Joyner's Drug Stores 
Taroma 

The Owl Drug Co. 

Bonney's Pbsrmacy 
Walla Walla 

Tallman Drug Cr 

Piatt's Pharmacy 

WEST VIRGINIA 
BlueSsjM 

White Pharmacy 
Charleston 

Opera Pharmacy 
Clarksburg 

Waldo Drug Co. 
K.Ik Ins 

Elk ins Drug Co. 
Fairmont 

Mountain City Dg Co 
Oral fon 

Coinerford's Phar. 
Huntington 

Wild A Boette 
MorgaBiown 

Ream's Drug Store 
Parkersburg 

O. J. Stout A Co 
Wheeling 

Mi L.i lii's lirug Store 

liner's Pharmacy 

I Front 



X\ ISCONSIN 

Applet on 

Downef's Pharmacy 

I' olid <l'l I i. 

W. It. Pis all Drug Co. 
(ireen Bsy 

It L McDonald, Dgs. 

Kenosha 

Kradwell Drug Co. 
La Cross« 

Hocsebler Bros. 
Madison 

The M'nges Phsr. 

I >< ttloS s Pharmacy 
Milwaukee 

Ids Drug Stor» 

1 be A Spiegel Co 
hradcr Drug Co 

Dill r ' • Pharmary 

'".'irnivat Costume I 
Itoiins 

Pi ' 'iv Dr'l>r Co 

i I • ' 1 1 Drug i ■ 
or 
A\ \ . •. Druggist. 



lf*e?B nf\i%oeHnq (Mfpfrfise^nftitf W^ly mfntim Y4MBTY 



30 



VARIETY 



DUPREZ 



AND 



GRACE HAZARD 



MONO LOG 1ST 



"FIVE FEET OF COMIC OPERA 



if 



Arrived from Europe after a combined business and honeymoon trip. 
Returning in March. Spring and Summer seasons of 1913 2nd 1914 
booked solid with Moss and Variety Theatres Controlling Co. tours. 



Permanent Address 1011 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn 



shape and It rounded Into a very pleasing 
entertainment. The change took Lasky's new- 
est act, "Trained Nurses, from sixth to clos- 
ing position, which was rather trying on tho 
musical sketch, but it managed to hold down 
the spot in excellent style. To Henry Berg- 
man and Gladys Clark go nearly all the 
honors for holding the piece up. Without 
them It would hardly pass. There la still 
plenty of room to fix It up. Lasky made a 
good start when he secured Clark and Berg- 
man, who have already won their way to 
warm popularity in vaudeville. They fit 
Into the parts to perfection and the longer 
the sketch lasts the better Clark and Berg- 
man should work, which will be to the bene- 
fit of the sketch. Anna Miller, as head 
nurse, has been given a "song plugging" 
number which should be changed. It does 
not fit at all, though it is no fault of the 
girl or her voice. "Trained Nurses" was 
very well liked Monday night by a well-filled 
house and it should be anywhere because 
Clark and Bergman are a very likable couple. 
Instead of closing as programed originally. 
"Roman Sport* and Pastimes" was moved 
into the middle of the bill. Some of routine 
was cut, but there was enough left to make 
a good act, the clean-cut hand-to-hand tricks 
winning warm approval and the comedy get- 
ting the laughs. Stuart Barnes landed a 
liberal share of the big honors. Considerable 
of his material has been heard before, but 
Barnes has the knack of working in new 
bits here and there which puts a fresh tinge 
to everything. His song "Single" was a 
great big laughing hit, one of the best char- 
acter songs he has used here. It is some 
time since Oenaro and Bailey showed in 
vaudeville round here. Returning with a 
series of dances they did very well toward 
the finish after a rather slow start. For 
a dancing turn they have gone to some 
length to build up on appearances alone, 
two pretty settings and some ravishing gowns 
adding plenty of picture to the act. Oenaro 
and Bailey have one of the few dancing 
acts which have lasted long. "Honor Among 
Thieves" was well placed for effect, the quiet 
comedy getting over nicely. This is a cap- 
ital sketch and well played. "Rube" Dick- 
inson drew down his share of the laughs, 
despite the flop of one of his best stories. 
The moving-picture story about the eleven 
couples who left the theatre by the back 
way was printed a few days ago in the 
local dallies as an equal occurrence In Wil- 
mington and It was evident that half of those 
In front had read It. Up to this point, "Rube" 
was flying high and was even rewarded for 
singing "My Irene." David Schoolar and 
Louise Dickinson scored solidly through the 
piano playing of the former. Schoolar Is 
young, but past the age for billing him as a 
:< prodigy." As a pianist, he is a wonder, 
while Miss Dickinson, a young girl, has a 
pleasing voice for the popular selections she 
has chosen to sing. The young people have 
a nice act which should get them plenty of 
work and applause. The bit of stepping 
might be eliminated and "Master" Schoolar 
might Just as well discard the "knickers." 
The Prosit Duo gave the show a fine start 
with their comedy acrobatic turn, working 
the early arrivals up to solid laughs without 
much effort. Sampsell and Rellly offered a 
singing and dancing turn that ran a trifle long. 
They are a well-dressed couple, but overwork 
the harmony thing. The bill was unusually 
heavy and ran overtime despite the cutting, 
but It was nicely arranged and reached a 
pleasing average of entertainment from start 
to finish. 

LIBERTY (M. W. Taylor, mgr. ; agent, 
Taylor Agency).— Too much talk In the center 
of the bill slowed up the show. A sketch 
called "Some Other Man's Wife" gave it 
the first dent. There is too much talk with 
very few situations strong enough to make 
an even balance. Vlcent O'Brien and Co. 
played It well enough and there were some 



STARRING ALONE 




Dora Dean 



(Formerly Johnson and Dean) 



Will produce for vaudeville a big novelty scenic offering with four people. 

Will be ready shortly to play a few week* In America before sailing to fulfill 
European time. 

Can use a rag drummer and piano player and two singing and dancing comedians. 

Address 19 W. 132d St.. New York City. 



Sam 



WARD and LYNN 



Eddie 



" ECCENTRIC TOMMY ATKINS " 

Doing nicely with Charles Taylor's 
"Dante's Daughters" Co. 

Next week (Oct. 7) Miner's Eighth Ave., New York 



ARTHUR YULE Presents 



BABY HELEN 

VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST CHILD ARTIST 

TIME ALL FILLED 

Special Feature This Week (Sept. 30) Savoy, Atlantic City 
Next Week (Oct. 7) Maryland, Baltimore 

Direction, NORMAN JEFFERIES 



FRED, and ADELE ASTAIRE 

Now Touring on the Orpheum Circuit in 

NED WAYBURNS VAUDEVILLE SUCCESS 
"A RAINY SATURDAY." 






SUCCESS THIS WEEK (September 30) COLONIAL, NEW YORK 



Phone 2731-J Bushwick 



laughs. The sketch is of light merit even 
for the small time. Bernard and Scarf fol- 
lowed with more talk, but this was light- 
up i a song and the clever way the 
dialog was handled brought good result* 
This team has been going along very nicely 
on the small time and getting by so well 
that It is a wonder they have not thrown 
out that "Lincoln" gag. It never belonged 
anyway. A new song for the young fellow, 
who knows how to use his stuff, would heir 
Next came "The Bachelor Club" and more 
talk. Happily, just about the time those 
In front were wondering what it was all about 
the four men got to their singing which 
finished up the skit In pretty good style. With 
about half the talk the quartet should do 
better. Most of It now goes simply as a 
time-killer. The singing saves the act and 
this night he built up with a little talk 
that Is new. Pletro was the hit of the 
show with his accord eon. He gets a lot of 
good music out of the Instrument, but is 
holding to some very old numbers. A nice 
appearance helps him and his act Is almost 
a surefire as a "pop" vaudeville offering. 
The Three Maynettes did nicely In the open- 
ing spot with their musical turn. The piano 
seemed out of tune or in higher pitch than 
the other instruments. The three girls are 
clever musicians and working In "one" is an 
advance along the line of Improvement the 
act needed when last seen. With a little 
more attention, and a good piano, the girls 
will have a nice little musical turn. The 
Dollar Troupe of acrobats furnished a very 
good closing number. 

BIJOU (Joseph Dougherty, mgr. : agent, U. 
B. O.).— The "Three Rascals" was the big 
clean-up act this week. The three boys with 
the piano carried the act through to a sub- 
stantial hit, their style of whooping things 
up Just suiting the Bijou audience who were 
loath to allow them to leave the stage. The 
entrance of one of the trio through the the- 
atre gave the trio a good start and they 
sailed right through at top speed, finishing 
with a riot of applause. Lew Bloom was 
back after a long absence with his old sketch 
In which he was assisted by Jane Cooper. 
It Is not the same woman who was In the 
act when Bloom played It several years ago, 
but she Is a clever helper to the comedian. 
Very little If anything In the act has been 
changed, the brown derby hat and clothes 
appearing Just the same. The sketch was a 
good laugh winner and Bloom will likely land 
the big time with It for he will be a stranger 
there now. Billy Burke's "The Last of the 
Regiment" is a soldier sketch and In the clos- 
ing position received liberal recognition on 
the singing of the men. Otherwise the sketch 
does not reach very far, although there is 
some light comedy attempted. It Is prob- 
ably new and may develop. Until then the 
singing and patriotic finish will carry It along 
the small time route. The Pelots pleased 
with their comedy Juggling turn. Ed. Smed- 
ley played on several banjos, finishing by 
playing one selection using several string In- 
struments which helped him through. The 
"banjo-talking" bit was well liked, but the 
straight playing could stand Improvement. 
Edgar Berger, a contortionist, with a rou- 
tine of familiar tricks, opened the bill. Busi- 
ness continues to hold up to a good mark but 
there was none standing Tuesday evening. 

VICTORIA (Jay Mastbaum, mgr. ; agent. 
Jules B. Aronson ) .— Show did not get above 
the fair mark this week. The Four Sons, a 
comedy quartet act, failed to live up to the 
headline position given, and this helped to 
weaken the average. The singing of the four 
Is below the standard for small time acts 
of this sort and the comedy falls far behind 
Golden and Leslie form a new musical team, 
having their first stage showing and con- 
sidering this handicap did very well, being 
one. of the best-liked acts on the bill. Both 
boys are clever musicians, a piano, cello and 



Ramsdell Trio 



Premier Dancing Wonders 



Next Week (Oct. 7) Grand, Syracuse 



Direction, Jenie Jacobs, Pat Casey Agency 



When answering aAverti*tm*n4$ kindly mmHon "VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



11 



Boston "Globe" Sept. 24, Keith's Theatre. 

The second new and delightful feature is 
the team bearing the firm name of Tony 
Hunting and Corlnne Frances, who appear in 
a little dramatic sketch called "Love Lozen- 
ges." Miss Frances has one of the sweetest 
personalities one can see in vaudeville in a 
ivhole season, a lovely face and a charming 
singing voice. 

Her masculine partner Is a clever comedian 
whose physiognomy and odd tricks of facial 
expression and gesture make a most refresh- 
ing form of comical entertainment. As a 
vender of lozenges that cause the . consumer 
to immediately fall desperately in love with 
the nrat person of the opposite sex appearing 
on the scene, he has an opportunity to create 
a lot of genuine fun. 



TONY 



CORINNE 



HUNTING 



FRANCES 



PRESENTING 



"A LOVE LOZENGE" 

Booked Solid United Time Direction JAMES PLUNKETT 



violin being used. They play popular ae- 
lections and need only experience and some 
rearrangement of their stage business to make 
this a first-rate musical act that ought to do 
very well. A few weeks in the small time 
houses will fit them for the bigger, small 
time where the music they offer will be ap- 
preciated. As a starter, they were a hit. 
Ezier and Webb offered their familiar "sister 
act," the former handling the comedy end 
for good results. She made the "souse" bit 
a big laugh and the act was well liked. Lew 
Trompeter, a new aspirant for honors with 
a "straight" single turn got through in good 
shape. He has a satisfactory singing TOlce 
and sends his songs over In pleasing style. 
The talk needs brushing up. Trompeter Is 
a likable looking young fellow with a snappy 
way of working and should Improve. Coden 
and Clifford offered a singing and dancing 
act of ordinary class. The singing Is the 
weakest spot. The pair needs to brush up 
the talk and stick to the dancing as much 
as possible. They were on several minutes 
too long on Monday. The singing and dancing 
of Morris and Clark held the act up, the 
efforts for comedy getting little. Robert Mac- 
Donald got along slowly with his musical 
turn but got even with those In front by 
slamming "William Tell" on the xylophone. 
That will square most any account. 

PALACE (Jay Mastbaum, mgr. ; agent, Jules 
B. Aronson).— The Seven Mischief Makers, a 
schoolroom act of the familiar type, did very 
well as the headllner. The singing was above 
the ordinary, one or two of the young people 
employed displaying good voices and ability 
to make their work count for something. 
Schoolroom acts have been numerous on the 
small time, but this one is above the ma- 
jority of them by a considerable margin and 
went over in good shape. The remainder of 
the bill was about fair on the average. Lil- 
lian Carter missed by using songs which 
got nothing, though the woman has a fairly 
good voice. She wears a couple of nice- 
looking costumes, but her comedy number and 
talk Is far shy. With proper material she 
should do better. The comedy was also the 
weak spot In the musical act of Faust and 
Faost. A woman looks after most of the 
comedy, but It never hits a very fast paoe 
and the act urags slowly. Both appear to 
be fair muscians. but hold to very old se- 
lections. Ihe act needs speeding up. Jack 
and Elsie Davis used cross-fire talk, a couple 
of songs and the man did some stepping on 
rollers. Elsie might help the comedy end 
of the act were she to try the rollers, but 
Elsie is growing real plumn now and prob- 
ably won t take any chances. They handle 
their talk In snappy style, dress neatly and 
have a nice little act for the small time. 
One expression by the man should be cut 
out. Martin and Elliott offered some stepping 
of the kind that Is passing away. Toaesca 
and Todesca have a bike act with a routine 
of tricks which are nicely done and received 
some favor. Vassar and Arkln were liked 
for the parodies by the comedian of the 
team. The talk Is too much of the same 
kind to get them what they need to hold 
the act up. A newer Idea of putting talk 
over with the songs will make them a use- 
ful small time act of their class. 

BROAD (Nixon & Zimmerman, mgra. : K. & 
E.).— Louis Mann. In 'Elevating a Husband," 
enjoyed good business last week and started 
well this week. The show Is well liked. 

CHESTNUT STREET OPERA HOUSE 
(Nixon A Zimmerman, mgrs.; K. A EM.— 
"The Love Wager" with Frltzl Scheff, doing 
a nice business. Aided by generally favor- 
able press comment the piece picked up some, 
starting Its second and final week. 

ADELPHI (Shuberts). — Robert Mantell 
played "King Lear" Monday night to a 
crowded house, It being a special perform- 
ance with many literary lights present. Busi- 
ness fair last week. 

FORREST (Nixon A Zimmerman, mgrs.; K. 
A E.).— The return engagement of "Trail of 
the- Lonesome Pine." with Charlotte Walker, 
opened to a well-filled house. A horse, used 
in the play, backed over the footlights on 
Monday night without doing any damage. 

QARRICK (Nixon A Zimmerman, mgrs.; K. 
A E.) — "Oet-Rlch-Quick Walllngford" began 
a two weeks' engagement. The house was 
half filled Monday night. Joseph Manning 
and Rose Lubonn, In the principal roles, 
met with warm recognition. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (D. Wegefarth, 
mgr. ).— The opening of the regular season had 
Madame X" with Eugenie Blair In the prin- 
cipal role, as Its attraction. This is the 
first time the piece has been given here at 
Popular prices and It was received with a 
large and enthusiastic audience. 



the plan is being given a lot of publicity 
about town. 



EMPIRE (E. J. Bulkley, mgr.).— A poor 
book is the chief handicap under which Sim 
Williams' "Girls from Joyland" are working 
at the preent time. Harry L. Cooper, who 



Is the principal comedian with the show, is 
credited on the program with being the author 
of "Flirting Flora" and "The Rich, Happy 
Heinle." Mr. Cooper must have waeted very 
little time in putting these two pieces to- 
gether. He Is wasting a lot of time trying 
to get away with them and keep "*— Williams 



FRED ZOBEDIE PRESENTS 



MISS 



MAYBELLE 



Colonel Sam M. Dawson, manager of the 
Trooadero, has started the "Country Orocery 
Store" plan of building up patronage. Thurs- 
day is fixed as the new feature night and 



CELEBRATED AMERICAN 
LYRIC SOPRANO 

Singing in four languages. Accompanied by her clever 
pianiste. 

Now touring the Pantages Circuit and received with 
genuine enthusiasm in every city. fm€ — >. 

Real merit always warrants proper placing, however the 
position in the program is incidental to the success of the 
above act. 

N. B. — Miss Fisher does not depend on restricted 
songs or the boosting of Music publishers. This act 

has been carefully arranged and adjusted to appeal to the 
modern vaudeville patrons therefore it must suit and meet 
with approval of the managers. 

Act runs as follows: 

Opening song in "One" with orchestra. 
Second number in "Two" with piano accompaniment. 
Third: Piano Solo by Miss Fisher's clever pianiste. 
Fourth: Medley of popular airs, that reaches the 
hearts of the auditors. 

Gowns of both ladies are beautiful and attractive. No 
quick changing of wardrobe is required. 

Now. Gentlemen Managers. I would like to hear from 

you regarding time in the middle west and east to open on 
or about the middle of January. 

Please do not write me that you must see the goods be- 
fore buying as I want to call your attention to the fact that 
I myself have played in the past 28 years every first class 
theatre on both continents, therefore you should give me 
credit for being a competent judge and likewise have faith 
in my recommendation. 

For terms and particulars address all communications 

Care VARIETY Office, San Francisco. 

FRED ZOBEDIE. 

When antwering adVs. .omenta kindly mention VARIETY. 



show n the running class with others of the 
Western Wheel. Cooper works hard enough 
and gets laughs when there la any excuse for 
them, without resorting to unclean comedy, 
which Is one mark to his credit. It is only 
when the slapstick comedy methods are used 
that he and Fred Bulla are able to start any- 
thing. In the way of real merriment. The 
Empire audiences are noted for their willing- 
ness to' laugh at anything, so that Cooper 
and Bulla cannot claim any credit for making 
them laugh. Bulla is a bit more quiet than 
usual, but he still finds ample opportunity to 
fall all over the stage for comedy purposes. 
In the second piece the biggest laugh was 
gotten by Cooper when he whirled a step- 
ladder around, breaking up the stage equip- 
ment. A comedy quartet number was an 
other big laugh winner, but the material used 
Is eo old that it must have been new to those 
who go to the Empire. The second piece 
is the better of the two, for It gives Cooper 
and Bulla more chance to work. There is 
nothing to the first part except the numbers, 
and in this respect the show averages very 
well all the way through. Victor Hyde is 
credited with putting the show on and he 
has done very well, several of the numbers 
standing out for special mention. The music 
13 not ordinary, either Neil Sullivan supply- 
ing some catchy airs for the chorus, and the 
girls get by nicely with what they have to do 
in the show. The opening number, with 
twelve of the girls dressed in outing suite of 
red and white made a neat appearance, but 
it was spoiled when six girls dressed a* Jock- 
eys, with very poor-looking costumes, Joined 
the procession. Later the "Marguerite" num- 
ber led by Mae Edwin was the best-looking 
of the lot and It was well sung. One or two 
other numbers were nicely costumed, but 
several were not. There Is too often a lack 
of uniformity and harmony In the coloring 
to call this a well-dressed show, the good 
being In the minority. With eo little com- 
edy to carry the show along and so many 
numbers that could be made so much of, Mr. 
Williams should take steps to make bis girls 
look as well as possible. Mae Edwin and 
Emily Nice are the only women principals 
in the cast. If several girls from the chorus 
who have "blta" are excluded. This Is also 
one of the ehow's weak spots. Miss Edwin 
looks well and sings In a satisfactory manner, 
but wears the same solid expression all 
through the show that gives one the Impres- 
sion that she must have something sad on 
her mind and has sworn never to smile. She 
leads a couple of numbers, and with a little 
life added to her personality could get along 
well enough with what she has to do. Mlas 
Nice Is always noticeable because of the short 
skirts she wears and the little skip she gives 
each time she enters or exits. That Tittle 
eklp marks Miss Nice as the soubret of the 
company, but that is all, for she is no more 
lively than Miss Edwin, the two playing too 
quietly at all times for the portions they 
hold. Some of the chorus girls get a chance 
to stand out prominently during the enter- 
tainment and make good when given the 
chance. The Vaughan Sisters have a spe- 
cialty In the second act and do a "bit" with 
Sim Williams In bis sketch which stamps 
them as capable of helping to Inject the snap 
and dash needed to build ">e show up w 
It falls down. Lillian Raymond also leads 
a number. Eugene West makes a satisfac- 
tory "straight" man in both pieces and has 
a pleasing singing voice which be makes 
good use of. Harry Gray is not particularly 
well cast as a Frenchman, nor does he dress 
It the way It should be dressed. E. L. Fles- 
ter has a couple of "bits" which offers an 
opportunity for him to use bis voice, which 
Is hie strongest asset. Mr. Williams, assisted 
by ten of the girls, opens the olio with a 
plantation sketch called "Levee Days." It Is 
an old-style sketch, but nicely staged, and 
Mr. Williams shows that he Is still capable 
of donning the cork and dancing shoes and 
getting away with good results. They like 
the sketch better than a lot of the other 
things that were offered, and Mr. Williams 
mlgh build up bis plantation skit Into a 
pleasing first part with a little effort, though 
It Is likely that the girls would balk at work- 
ing In blackface. Bulla and Gray offered some 
talk of light merit. Miss Edwin and E. L. 
Flester offered a singing turn which found 
favor. They have selected popular songs 
and sing them In a likable manner. The 
featured act with the ebow Is a dramatic 
sketch called "Blanche." presented by Eu- 
gene West, Catherine Henry and Alice Blair. 
The sketch has played the small time, and 
wherever the heroic style of sketch Is accented 
this one will very likely go as strong as it 
did here. It has a good strong story of the 
heart Interest kind, with the wronged woman 
standing out as Its principal < hniH'ter. Her 
willingness to sacrifice hcrneif for the lnv« 
and happiness of a sinter who has married 
the man who turned her down Is the climax 



tt 



VARIETY 



Kl 




NEW NOVE 

ON 
IVIY 

Greater Than Our Famous "Bl 




IVAL" 



tf 



By 

BILLY GASTON 

A Great Big Tremendous Hit— Put It On and Get Your Share of the Applause With This Wonderful Song. Anybody Can Sing It — A World Beater 




i-AIVIEIMT- 



By 
BILLY GASTON 



KENDIS 



which makes the appeal. The third char- 
acter holds little importance, except to fill 
out the "picture." The sketch is out ot 
it* atmosphere as an olio number in a bur- 
lesque show, particularly in this one, which 
Is In need of something to enliven It. As 
a small time vaudeville act It ought to 
please, even the way West and Henry play 
it. The title helps to spoil Its chances. It 
would be easy to find a stronger and more 
fitting one that would mean something. Now 
It only kids the burlesque patron into lb* 
Idea that he Is going to see something mys- 
terious. The "Girls from Joyland" could 
be made a very good show. With the pres- 
ent book there Is not much chance. A lead- 
ing women who will smile and a soubret 
with some ginger and style to her would 
also help some. The best "dope" la for Mr. 
Williams to write and produce his own book 
If he can get the same results as ha did 
when he threw his plantation sketch to- 
gether. 

BOSTON. 

BY J. GOOL.TS. 

KEITH'S Harry B. Gustln, mgr. ; agent. U. 
B. O.).— With cool weather, business has ta- 
ken a rise so that the house is showing 
capacity. "Puss In Boots," pleaded; Hal Ste- 
phen, hit of bill ; Brown. Harris A Brown, 
good ; Lew Hawkins, went well ; English 
Roses, scored ; Charles Webber, good ; Lane- 
ton, Lucler Co., good; Delaur Duo, opened 
well. Pictures. 

PLYMOUTH (Fred Wright, mgr., Lleblers). 
—"Oliver Twist," with an all-star cast, opened 
to big business for a two weeks' engage- 
ment 

SHUBERT (E. D. Smith, mgr. ; Shubert.— 
"The Butterfly on the Wheel." third and 
last week. Business not good. 

BOSTON (Al Loverlng, mgr.; K. A E.).— 
"Robin Hood" started an engagement to a 
capacity audience. Business should be good 
for the stay. Cast an attraction. 

MAJESTIC (E. D. Smith, mgr. ; Shubert).— 
"The June Bride" closing a two weeks' stay. 
Business has been fair. "Little Boy Blue" 
to follow. 

H0LL1S (Charles B. Harris, mgr. ; K. A 
E.).— "The Talker" with Tully Marshall. He 
is an attraction in Boston. Business should 
be good for the two weeks. 

COLONIAL (Thomas Lothian, mgr. ; K. A 
E.).— "The Quaker Girl" still doing well. 
Fourth week. 

PARK (W. D. Andreas, mgr.; K. A E).— 
"Maggie Pepper" with Rose Stahl. Fifth 
week of satisfactory box office receipts. 

TREMONT (John B. Schoffleld, mgr. ; K. A 
E.).— "The Woman Hater's Club" In last 
week. Returns have been good. 

CASTLE 8QUARE (John Craig, mgr.).— 
Stock; "Sherlock Holmes." 

ST. JAMES (M. H. Guloslan, mgr.).— Stock ; 
"Magda." with Nance O'Nell. 

GAIETY (George Batchellor, mgr.).— Bur- 
esqu* 1 ; "The College Girls." 

CASINO (Charles Waldron, mgr.).— Bur- 
lesque ; "The Dazzlers." 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (W. Lothrop, 
mgr.).— Burlesque, "High Life in Burlesque." 

"The Polish Wedding" Is the first Cohan A 
Harris production of the year to come to 
town. It will stay at the Tremont for two 
weeks beginning next Monday. 

The Witch theatre, Salem, is being en- 
larged by Mr. Saine, the manager. 

Mrs. Frank Merrill now has charge of the 
booking In Sbeedy's Boston office. 

Operatic musical" concerts have been an- 
nounced by Director Henry Russell, of the 
Boston Opera House, as attractions for Sun- 
day afternoons, to take place "between din- 
ner and tea." 



High Class Ballad and One of the Greatest Ever Published. 

ORCHESTRATIONS OF ALL SONGS IN SEVEN KEYS NOW READY 

PUBLISHED AND COPYRIGHTED BY 



V, 1367 Broadway crSTmstrtet. New York City 



Mrs. William Meehan, wife of William Mee- 
han. the comedian with "The Qlrl From the 
Orient," that played at the National last week, 
died Friday at a downtown hotel. He re- 
ceived word of her death while he was on 
the stage. He finished bis number, then 
rufhed from the theatre In his make-up. The 
next day be played the two shows as he had 
no understudy. During the last number he 
broke down completely, quit tbe stage and 
allowed the chorus to finish the finale alone. 

Blanche Ring In "The Wall Street Qlrl" 
is coming to the Tremont In a few weeks. 



Orace Elllston will play the lead In "Com- 
ing Home to Roost" when It has Its premiere 
at the Hollis in two weeks. 



Lew Fields was In Boston nearly all of 
last week fixing the "June Bride." Ha has 
been getting It ready for the rest of the 



A B.).— Lecture on India (30-2) ; William 
Hodge In "The Man From Home." (3-5). 

The first three days at the Apollo Prince 
Rustomjee, of India, gave an illustrated lec- 
ture on that interesting country. He was as- 
sisted by his wife. In his native country 
he edits the "Oriental Review" of Bombay. 
The laat three days of next week "The 
Little Millionaire" Is to be the attraction. 



ATLANTIC CITY. 

By 1. B. PULASKI. 

SAVOY (Harry Brown, mgr. ; agent, U. B. 
O.).— Julius Steger & Co, in "Justice"; Mr. 
Steger does an admirable bit o fwork. Sup- 
port capable. "Justice" is worthy addition 
to Mr. Steger's repertoire. Baby Helen, a 
most wonderful child, probably heads the 
list of infant prodigies. She started a small 
riot here. Apollo Trio, fine exhibition ; Nich- 
ols Sisters, big ; Nevins & Gordon, pleased ; 
Frank A. Mullane. well liked ; Marcus A Oar- 
telle. very good. 

MILLION DOLLAR PIER (J. L. Young, 
mgr.; WIster Orookett. bus. mgr.). — M. P. 

STEEPLECHASE PIER (Morgan ft Fennan. 
mgrs. ). — M. P. 

STEEL PIER (J. Bothwell, mgr.)— M. P. 

BIJOU DREAM (Harry Brown, mgr.)— M. P. 

CRITERION (I. Notes, mgr.).— M. P. 

CITY SQUARE (E. O'Keefe. mgr.)— M. P. 

ROYAL (W. R. Brown, mgr.).— M. P. 

CENTRAL (Karrer ft Short, mgrs.)— M. P. 

APOLLO (Fred E. Moore, mgr. ; agent, K. 



The Three White Kuhns, who have bean 
the most popular entertainers In town since 
May 3. have left the Jackson Cafe, which 
they literally "made." They open at the 
Majestic Cafe. Philadelphia, this Saturday, 
having been engaged. It la aald. for the entire 
winter. Judging from what the boys did 
here, they should tear things apart in Phila- 
delphia cafadom. Going down the Boardwalk 
a few days ago Bobby, Charlie and Paul 
Kuhn were taking the air. A big many- 
colored butterfly was apparently fluttering 
along about a foot over their heads. Charlie 
took off hla new "kelly" and leaped for the 
pretty Insect. He did a nice flop— certainly 
not a "high and lofty" but more correctly 
a "ground and ground." No, he did not fall 
on his hat. Atlantic City has returned to 
normal conditions as typified by the reap- 
pearance of the pontes on the beach. 

The American Good Roads Congress Is In 
convention here with headquarters on tbe 
Million Dollar Pier. The exhibits Include all 
kinds of apparatus concerned in making 



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The HESS Company 

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Sold by all Leading Druggists, Costumers and Hair Dealers through the 
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roads. Oovernor Wilson spoke before the 
congress on Monday afternoon. 

After a very stormy experience Frank Hubin 
finally abandoned his moving picture place in 
Pleasantville. He got in Dutch with the off- 
shore folk by running his show Sunday and 
he continued to win their enmity in various 
ways. He tried to sell his place and then 
to rent it. Now he has left It. The thing 
that chased him from the village two weeks 
ago was the new place (Palace) conducted 
by Dan Humphries, the blind manager, and 
Sidney Hellbronner. who are partners. Tbe 
Palace seats over 1,000 and for several weeks 
stock has been given in addition to pic- 
tures. Hubin is back on the job at his 
postcard store on the Boardwalk. 

S. F. Nixon placed a contract for an ad- 
dition to his apartment house on Maryland 
avenue near the Beach. The Improvements 
will include two additional stories to the 
present structure and a new building to ex- 
tend to the Boardwalk. The contract calla 
for an expenditure of $100,000. 

NEW ORLEANS 

By O. M. SAMUEL. 

DAUPHINB (Henry Oreenwall, mgr. ; Shu- 
bert.). — The Dauphine opened Saturday even- 
ing with "Polly of the Circus." Elsie St Leon 
has the principal role this season. 

TULANE (T. C. Campbell, mgr.).— Mltten- 
thal Brothers offer "Naughty Marietta." The 
producers have spared no expense. 

CRESCENT (T. C Campbell, mgr. ; K. ft 
E.).— ' 8e*en Days." 

OREENWALL (J. J. Holland, mgr.).- 
Dinkins ft Stair Burlesquers. 

LYRIC (C. D. Peruchl, mgr.).— Peruchi 
Oypzene Stock Co., in "Married Life." 

LAFAYETTE (Abe Sellgman, mgr.).— Pic- 
tures and vaudeville. 

MAJESTIC (L. E. Sawyer, mgr.).— Tyson 
Extravaganza Co. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr. ; agent, 
direct.).— Hassans, excellent wire turn; Ma- 
son and Dutlel. good small timers; Rlvoll. 
keen appreciation; Cabaret Trio, hit; "Dink- 
lesplel's Christmas," uproarious laughter; 
Chris Richards, did nicely; Schmettans, splen- 
did. 



F. W. Stair, one of the lessees of the 
Oreenwall, Is expected to arrive here this 
week. A change of the company or policy 
is expected to be Instituted upon his arri- 
val. 



Among the principals engaged for the French 
opera house, not already mentioned, are Mile. 
Therry, falcon ; M. Delval, basso noble ; M. 
Montano, M. Brunat and M. Combes, bari- 
tones. 



Fire damaged the Ruston. La., opera house. 
It will be operated temporarily as an air- 
dome. 



Lew Birch and Vera McKee, members of 
the "Balkan Princess" company, were mar- 
ried by the J. P., of Meridian, Miss. 

Mabel Keith, with the Colonial Septet, un- 
derwent an operation at Birmingham, Ala. 

A young man has been Impersonating Fred- 
eric Thompson in this vicinity. He hasn't 
raised anything yet save suspicion. 

A receiver has been asked for the National 
Film Exchange. R. J. Ooebel is the appli- 
cant. 



ST. LOUIS 

■w JOHN S. BUN ■ ST. 

COLUMBIA (H. D. Buckley, mgr.). -The El- 
liott Savonas mad* an excellent headllner; 
J ere Grady ft Co., went bl- ; Clara Ballerinl. 
unique; Barry A Walford, excellent; 3yd my 
Shields ft Co., laughs; Little Billy, scored, 
McKay ft CantwelT, much applause; Reed 
Bros., very clever; Increased business. 

HIPPODROMB (Frank L. Talbot, mgr.).— 
Serignano's Banda Roma, headlined ; Great 
Buoner, sensational ; Milton A Dolly Nobles, 
(vary good ; Wegota Four, harmonious ; Tho 
Chanticleer Four, entertaining; Gross & Jack- 
son, many laugha ; LeBoeuf ft St. George, 
marvellous ; Derenzo A Laru. daring ; Kosa 
Walfrlo Troupe A Thompson s Horses closs 
a well-balanced bill to crowded houses. 






o 4mr t t$0n*n u kindly w*n*tO» VARIETY 



VARIETY 



33 



CHARLES HORWITZ 

Aatbe* of ine kwt Plsv/lete end IkMtkM 
te Vaudeville. HI* m«rd spoa lit for Itself . 

Hundred* of — ■ Don't experiment 

wltb others. Get * Horwlta sketch. Cmll, 

write or tolepkene. 

CHARLES HUBWITZ. 

140t Broadway (Room sift). New York. 
phono S040 Murray Hill. ^^ 

Telrpbone S006 Bryant. 

W. H. BUMPUS 



TRANSFER 



to All 



Bagwge Called tor aad Checked 
Railroad* and 8lco.ni boot.. 
Stand. 8. K. Car. 4M St. aad 8th Are. 
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I. MILLER. 1SS4 Broadway. %ir 

TtJ. aatt-? Caabas -^ Ma nuf aeterer 

N -Y.^ | ^BalaH f and Acrobatio 




Shoe* a 
cialty. AH work 
made at short 
no tie*. 
Write tor Catalog 4. 



LEST YOU FORGET 
WE SAY IT YET 



CROSS 

LETTER HEADS 

Contract*. Ticket*. Envelope*. Free Sample*. 
STAGE MONET, 15c. Book of Herald fata. Me. 

cross avraa.KK'g cmcwo 

WIGS 

Wo handle a fall Una of theatrical win hi 
*jaalltlco af from SB to SIM each. 



THE WIGGERY 

J. NRGREftCOfJ. 
S4 BAST MADISON STREET. CHTCAGO. 

COSTUMER 

THEATRICAL 

Tel. tftaa Murray Hill. 

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HIGH GRADE 

MAKE-UP 

"Not How Cheap 

but How Good" 

told by Landing Druggists 
Cottumm, Hair Store* and 



CHAS. H. SM H 0F . UIUMI 

American Theatre Bid*;.. New York. 
Care ROLAND WEST. Phone. tSOO Bryant. 



MHL 

BELMONT 

MILLINER TO 
ALICE LLOYD 

503 Fifth Av. 

Entrance on 42nd Street 
Phone, Bryant 4774 NEW YORK 




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PRINCESS 'Dan Flshell. mgr.).— Princess 
Maids in "Breaking Into Society," scored 
heavily ; Barrett A Creed, hit ; Eastman A 
Moore, did nicely ; business good. 

KINGS (F. C. Melnhardt, mgr.).— Pete 
Mack 4 Co., featured ; Cameron A O'Connor, 
second honors ; Leslie ..assen, good ; Xmas 
Belles, beautiful ; Schaller Bros., well re- 
ceived. 

OLYMPIC (Walton Sanford, mgr. ) .— "Mme. 
Sherry." with George A. Schiller. 

SHU BERT (Melville Stoli, mgr.).— "Modern 
Eve." 

QARRICK (Nat. Smith, mgr.).— Valeaka 
Suratt in "The Kirs Waltz," opened a two 
weeks' engagement and scored an Immediate 
success. 

AMERICAN (D. B. Russell, mgr.).— Murray 
A Mack in "Casey Jones" opened to large 
houses. 

LA SALLE (Oppenhelmer Bros., mgrs.).— 
Florence Mills in "Alma. Where Do You Live?" 
at popular prices proved a success. 

OAYETY (Charles L Walters, mgr.).— "The 
Star and Garter Show" with an unusually 
large chorus drew a large crowd at opening 
performance. 

STANDARD (Leo Reichenbach, mgr.).— 
"Yankee Doodle Girls," featuring Dashing 
Dainty Marie entertained a laree gathering. 

SHENANDOAS ( W. J. Flynn, mgr.).— Her- 
bert, headlined to advantage • Boston Von A 
Co., scored ; Neville A Remington, applause ; 



good; Havlland A Thornton, hit; Homer Llnd 
A Co., hit; Don, the Talking Dog, hit; "The 
Hold Up." featured; Walter C. Kelly, 
"knockout"; Klutlng's Entertainers, closed. 

AUDITORIUM (R. J. Gomes, agent).— 
Bannister A VIgard, Bradley A Reno, C. E. 
Hays. The Great A. 17. Scafar's Dog and 
Goat Circus. Ellen Lee. 

LYCEUM (H. Hart, mgr.; agent, Gus Sun). 
— Sheda A Co., Josephine Claremont, Jlmmle 
Cassidy A Co., Broh A Lyon, Three MUlere, 
The . Russells, Daley Cameron, Douglas 
Washburn A Co., Alexander Mazsone, Leon 
A Adelle Sisters. 

STANDARD (iR. K. Hynicka, mgr.).— 
"Girls of the Great White Way" is splen- 
didly staged, while the costumes are rich 
and beautiful, with a "rattling" good-look- 
ing set of choristers to wear them. Sam 
Hearn was extremely funny. Harry D. 
Ward was excellent. James Rowland Is 
funny. Helen Eley and Estelle Barry both 
scored. 

PEOPLE'S (James E. Fennessy, mgr.).— 
"The Cherry Blossoms," two musical farces, 
"What Happened to McGulrk" and "Widow 
McCarthy's Boarders," make up the pro- 
gram. Jack Perry has two "fat" parts and 
Is funny. Frank Dobson, Jack Rose. 
Brownie Carroll, Georgie Clifford were good. 
Brownie Carroll, Ethel Hall and Lillian 
Perry are clever comediennes. They sing a 










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240 W. 50th St. 
NEW YORK 




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THEATRE LIGHTING OUR SPECIALTY 



Bob Allbiight, entertained; Kent's Seals close 
J a good bill. 



X 



Century, after a delayed opening owing to 
alterations to the Century Building, which 
will now be a part of the Syndicate Trust 
building opens next Sunday offering Thomas 
W. Ross In "The O nly So n." 

The Ne wSt. Louis Fair closed a very pros- 
perous week, the feature of which was the 
making of a new world's record on a dirt 
track oy the speed klnr. Bob Burman. 



CINCINNATI 

By HABRY HESS. 

LYRIC (Jas. E. Fennessy, mgr.; Schu- 
bert*).— "Within the Law," well rendered by 
a capable company. Lewis J. Cody as the 
junior Gilder, fine; Susanne Wills In the 
comedy role of Agnes Lynch scored big. 

GRAND O. H. (John H. Havlln, mgr.; 
agents. K. A E.)—" Passers- By." Charles 
Cherry repeated his former success. 

WALNUT (W. W. Jackson, mgr.; S. A 
H.).-A1. H. Wilson. "It Happened In 
Potsdam" pleased. Wilson is a singer of 
the Emmett type. W. H. Howell was clever, 
as was W. T. ChsUerton. Laura Lemmers 
scored. "Loves of Bygone Days," "The Twi- 
light Call" and "My Fair Lady" were three 
big musical hits. 

EMPRESS ("George F. Fish, mgr.; S-C; 
rehearsal Sunday, 10).— The Two Hedders, 
opened; Jack Ranahan, hit: Katherlne Sel- 
sor, fine; "Fun In a Cabaret," featured; 
Fix A Ward, excellent; The Five Musical 
Lunds, scored. 

KEITH'S (J. J. Murdock, mgr.; agent,. U. 
B. O.; rehearsal Sunday 10).— The Sayton 
Trio, opened ; Les Cadets de Gascogne, very 



number of good songs. Frank Dobson was 
excellent. He did aome original dancing. 
Kelo A Payne, acrobats, bit; Clifford A Rose, 
scored. 

KEITH'S (U. B. Oj; open Sunday mati- 
nees).— "Apple of Paris," Bert Leslie, Six 
Klrksmltb Slaters, Bonlta and Hearn, 3 Kea- 
tons, J. Francis Dooley, Belle Story, Stlck- 
ney's Circus. 

BALTIMORE 

By ARTHUR L. BOBB. 

MARYLAND (F. C. Schanberger, mgr. ; 
agent, U. B. O. Rehearsal Monday 10.).— A 
well-blended bill with Valerie Bergere and 
Co., well in the lead for applause in "His 
Japanese Wife." Billy McDermott. very funny ; 
Max's International Circus, appreciated ; Six 
American Dancers, clever; Alfredo, novel; 
Hobby Heath and Ruby Raymond, amused ; 
Lillian Ashley, well liked. Business good. 

NEW THEATRE (George Schneider, mgr. ; 
direct. Rehearsal, Monday 10.).— The Cabaret 
Four, headed pleasing program ; i.ap Handy 
& Co., hit; Faden, O'Brien A Co., excellent; 
Hilton A Hughes, amused ; Burns A Faustina, 
laughs ; Paul Cavalll, fair. 

VICTORIA (C. E. Lewis, mgr. ; agent, Nlxon- 
Mruiinger. Rehearsal Monday. 10 A. M.).— 
The star attraction, "Circumstantial Evi- 
dence," with Harry Burkhardt in the lead- 
ing role, thrilled a big audience. The Fern- 
Bennett Co. pleased ; Berg and Wilson, en- 
tertaining; Alma, clever; Seymore, Dempeey 
& Seymore, fine ; Brown and BartolettI, lauRhs. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC (Tunis F. Deane. 
mgr. ; agent, Nixon-Nlrdllnger. Rehearsal 
{Monday 10).— For the final week of vau le- 
vllle the program in headed by The Levy 
Family, who were well received ; The Klns- 
Ners, excellent : Fiddler A Shelton, clever. 
Malllday A Carlln, funny ; Lyric Comedy Four, 



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N. Y. CITY 

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Sam Howard Bell Boy Trio 




FRANK HAYDEN 

THEATRICAL COSTUMER 
149 W. 36th ST.. IEW YORK 

Tel. leal Greeley. 
Stage and EvctUag Go wae on band. 

Mme. MENZELI 

Former Premiere Danseuse and Maltrease d« 

Ballet 
HIGH SCHOOL of Dancing and Pantomime. 
St East 16th Street, bet. firway and Ith Ave. 
Classic Ballet and AH Stylos of Dancing Acts 
created and staged 
Normal School of Dancing 
Pupils: Mile. Dasle. Hoffman, Froellch. Mar- 
low and other prominent stars. 
Bend for Booklet. 



p vN V.GERSTNf. Ro , 

654 t gh tm Avi N v. • .<• 4 

Wf HAVETHr 1 AKGf r OCK Of 

THEATRICAL bTAGfZ HARDWARE 

#a in n TOOLS in this CITY 



PROFESSIONALS NOTICE 
Send me 40 cents la stamps and I will mall 
yoa at ooro 100 first class buelaees cards. 
NBIGKB, Tbe Prtnler, 76 West aladleon St., 

Chicago. 

25 Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

f Ne. CLARK STREET. CHICAGO 

Practice In all State and U. 8. Courts. 

Call ADVICE FREE Write 

SHORT VAMP SHOES 

WOm 8TAOE, gTREET AND 
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SUPPERS 

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FOR SALE 

Beautiful black SHETLAND PONT wltb 
four white feet. Weight, 360 pounds. Stage 
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have BICYCLE RIDING BABOON for sale. 
Only reliable people need apply. 

Address. POTTS, 

rear 3256 RHODES AVE., 

CHICAGO. ILL. 

scored ; Marie Russell, pleased. Pictures. 
Good bouses. 

FORD'S (Cbaries E. Ford. mgr. ; K. A B.).— 
William Farnum in "Tbe Littlest Rebel," 
scored. Large audience. 

AUDITORIUM (Robert McBrlde. mgr.; Stau- 
bert). — Annette Kellermann and her fellow 
artists packed this playhouse from pit to 
dome Monday night. The program runs mostly 
to dancing and pantomime. Miss Kellermann 
In "Undine" being tbe real feature. 

OAYETY (Wm. Ballauf, mgr.).— The Social 
Maids, with George Stone and Jennie Austin, 
pleased big house Monday afternoon. 

EMPIRE (George W. Rife, mgr.).— A large 
audience Monday nlgbt enjoyed "Miss New 
York, Jr.," with Joseph Wat&on and Will II. 
Cohen, taking care of tbe comedy. 

HOLL1DAY ST (Wm. Rife, mgr.; 8. A H.) .— 
"Oklahoma." with George Kennedy in the 
lead, was well presented by The Klimt A Oaz- 
colo Stock Co. to good-sized house Monday 

night. 

ALTOONA, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Wllmer A Vincent, mgrs.; TJ. 
B. O. ; rehearsal, Monday, 10). — Camm A 
The Ira. fair; Carrel A Plerlot Co., liked; 
Jules Harron, laughs; Five Melody Maids. 

big. E. O. B. 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 
MAJESTIC (Arthur Lsne, mgr.; W. "V. M. 
A ; rehearsal, Mon., 2). — 10-2. Fslrmsn A 
Furman, scored; Rosa Maynon's Trained 
Birds, fine; Fusto A Fussy, good: Demarest 
A Doll, riot; Col. J. A. Pattea and the Old 
Soldier Fiddlers, big hit; 8-5. Florence Arnold, 
Carroll A Aubrey. Kingsbury A Munson, "The 
Bronco Busters." H. L. MELTON. 




ATLANTA. GA. 

GRAND (H. L Cordoza, mgr.). — Ferrell 
Broa., good; Ellda Morrla. pWas.rl; l.aVine- 
Clmaron Trio, comedy hit; Th»- n»rr.ris. hit; 
"More Sinned Agalnat that: IJhumI," good; 
Great Froslnl. splendid; Three Farrell Sin- 
ters, hit. 



WKtn answering advertisement* kindly mention VARIETY. 



34 



VARIETY 



TWO TREMENDOUS SHAPIRO HITS 



j 



SOUTHERN MARCH-RAG SONG 



By BALLARD MAC DONALD and CARROLL and FIELDS 

We stake our reputation on this son*i being one of the greatest song hits we have publisheu in 15 years 






SEEM 



i. 



WONDERFUL SEMI-BALLAD 



By COOPER and OPPENHEIM 

The mosl successful song of its kind on the market this year ju>>t off the press 



SHAPIRO MIIQIP PIIR Pfl aoiLSftKRwmNA Broadway and 39lh St. 
OnnrillU lYlUOlU rUU. UU. v M3...> s ,„ 8 d.™^ ) New York 



THE LTRIC (H. L. Cordoza A H. L. De- 
Give, mgrs). — The Goose Girl, played to food 
business. 

BIJOU (H. L. DeGive, mgr.).— Roy * Wil- 
son, good; Dorothy Dalley, fair; Jars;* A 
Hamilton, hit; Luken A Loretta, food. 

THE ATLANTA (Homer George, mgr.). — 
28-36. Al O. Fields' Minstrels, played to stand- 
ins; room; 17-18, Mutt A Jeff, good business. 

THE FORSYTH (H. L. Cordosa, mgr.). — 
"Oliver Twist" pictures, fair business. 

JOYCE. 

BLOOMTNGTON, ILL. 

MAJESTIC (A. G. Schade, mgr.).— Sept 
22-26. Musical Gates, pleased; Mark Davis, 
monolog; Tone A Stasia Moore, hit; Menlo 
Moore Lads and Lassies, featured; Sept. Si- 
29, Al Allen, hit; Larkin A Pearl, pleased; 
Zls-Zag Trio, good; Seven American Belforda, 
good gymnsst feature. 

THE CHATTERTON OPERA HOUSE (C. 
A. Takacs. mgr.). — 28-26, Jack Beaaey Stock; 
27. "Louisiana Lou." 



Frank M. Raleigh, for many years con- 
nected with the local opera house as manager 
Is now manager of a house rn Oklohoma City. 

"WAG." 



THE GREAT SONG HIT. 



ee 



Oh, You Little Bear" 



NOW BEING MADE BY 



I 



Mgr. Professional Dept. 

Will be glad to welcome all his friends. 

JOE. MORRIS MUSIC CO., ISO W. 37TH ST., NEW YORK. 



ERIE PA 
COLONIAL (A. P. Weschler, mgr.; A. V. 
1 O'Brien, aast mgr.; Gus Sun A U. B. O. 
rehearsals, Mon.. 10). — S Cyclonlans, good; 
< McGarry A Reviere, big; The Act Beautiful, 
clever; Malde DeLong, good; Melanl Opera 
Troupe, excellent; Bixley A Lerner, good. 

PARK THEATRE— Horne Stock Co., At 
the Mercy of Tiberius. * 

MAJESTIC (J. L. Gilson, mgr.). — Oct. 1, 
"He Fell In Love with His Wife"; t. A born 
Opera Co.. "Bohemian Girl"; S. Madam Nasi- 
mova, "The Marionettes.'' 

W. H. MIZENER. 



average; Dan Mason A Co., feature 
Caffey, well liked; Price 1 A Price, sc 



Norlnne 
sensational. 
THAYER. 
CAMDEN, N. J. 

BROADV AT (W. B. McCallum, mgr.).— 
26-28. "House That Jack Built," weak; Mur- 
phy A Wlllard. took; Faust A Faust, fair; 
May Walsh, liked; 30-2, Albers Bears, novel; 
Edwin Lindsiey Co.. entertained; Paul A Vic 
Burns, funny; Holdsworths, pleased; Francis 



tean, good; Paul Floras, xylophone, many re- 
calls; Ralph Connors, ventriloquist, well 
liked; Four Comrades, good results, business 
fine. 
BURTIS CORT (Shubert A Kindt).— SS-St, 

Bernhardt pictures; SO, Bunty Pulls the 
Strings. 

GRAND (David L. Hushes). — SO week, 

Paul Rainey's African Hunt pictures; 2. U. 
S. Marine Band. SHARON. 



BUFFALO. 

STAR (P. C. Cornell, mgr.; K A E.). — 
SO-I. Naslmova in "The Marionettes"; 1-6, 
"The Pink Lady." 

TECK (John R. O'Shel. mgr.; ShuberU).— 
"Bunty Pulls the 8trlngs." 

SHEA'S (Henry J. Carr, mgr.; U. B. O.; 
rehearsal Mon., 10). — Mario Trio, clever; Lin- 
den Beckwith, fair; Miss Zelda Sears In "Ths , 
Wardrobe Woman," won favor; Crelghtdn 
Bros, amused; Eternal Walts, splendid; Prim- 
rose Four, exceptional; Kitty Traney, versa- 
tile. 

LAFAYETTE (C. M. Bagg, mgr.; Empire 
Circuit). — "Original Burlesquers." 

GARDEN (M. T. Mlddleton. mgr.; Colum- 
bia Circuit). — "Runaway Girls" with the 
Burke Brothers. 

FAMILY (A. R. Sherry, mgr.; Loew; re- 
hearsal Mon., 10). — Hlll-Bowen-Zorn. went 
well; Keenan A Beverly, a hit; Princeton A 
Yale, good; Dave Clifford, clever; Cooper A 
Ricardo. fine; Three Entertaining Fellows, 
artistic 

ACADEMY (Henry M. Marcus, mgr.; Loew; 
rehearsal Mon.. 10). — Harold McAullffe, 
passed; Mae Burns, applause; Seven Colonial 
Montrose Troupe, Immense; Tfie Quaker Girls, 
well received; Marello Bros., laughter; Hazel 
Moran. Interesting; Richard Hamlin, above 




Wood, songs; 2-4, O'Brien A Lear, Goldrlck 
A Moore, Maye Holmes Co., Dudley McKomls. 
TEMPLE (Fred W. Falkner, mgr.). — 26-28, 
"Home Sweet Home"; 80-2. "The Deep Pur- 
ple." DANIEL P. McCONNELL. 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

AMERICAN (C. E. Berkell, mgr.; Pantages 
Bookings; rehearsal, Mon., 12.80). — 28. An 
old fashioned melodrama, Lillian Mortimer 
A Co.. goes big; Leavltt A Dunsmore, pro- 



ELMIRA. N. T. 

MOZART (Felber A Shea. mgrs.). — Lamb's 
Manikin's, well received; Murphy A Francis, 
good; Duval A Davll. good; Mile. Emerle. 
fair. 

MAJESTIC (M. D. Gibson, mgr.; U. B. O.). 
— Adelaide Herrmann, pleasing; Dick Miller, 
good. 

LYCEUM (Lee Norton, mgr.; Rels Circuit). 
— 2, The Concert; 6, The Girl In the Taxi. 

J. M. BEERS. 



FIFTEEN MINUTES OF QUALITY 

AND 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 

SAVOY (L. M. Boaa, mgr.).— 80-1, Aborn 
Opera Co.; 2, "The Million." 

ACADEMY (L. M. Boas, mgr.; loew; re- 
hearsal Mon., 10). — 80-2, Lawton. good; Ray- 
mond, Leigh ton A Morse, very good; Irish 
Colleens, hit; Morton A Kramer, good; 8-6, 
Hunter's Dogs. May El wood A Co., Carter A 
Davis, Irish Colleens. 

PREMIER (L. M. Boas, mgr.; Loew; re- 
hearsal Mon., 10). — 80-2, Love A Haight, good; 
Anderson A Golnes, very good; 3-6. Hilton A 
Bannon, Margo's Manikins. 

BIJOU (H. M. Goodhue, mgr.; rehearsal 
Mon., 10). — 80-2, Kearney, Buckley A Cook, 
Edith Montrose, "Olrl from Golden West." 
Chas. Lombard; 3-6, Walker Trio. Old Town 
Minstrel Four, Evans A Floyd. "Girl from 
Golden West." EDW. F. RAFFERTY. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

COLUMBIA (Frank* J. O'Donnell, mgr.; 
U. B. O.).— 8. Miller-Kent A Co.. Waterbury 
Bros. A Tenney. Spellman's Bears, Knight 
and the Daye Bisters, Emelle Egamar, Gee- 
Jays. Ball A West. 

ORPHEUM (E. J. Veasey. mgr.; Ind.). — 
Wheelock-Hayes Trio, Lamb A Lamb, Tambo 
Boys. Haggarty A Hobbs. 

POWERS (Harry G. Somers. mgr.; K. A E.). 
— The Flirting Princess, Sept. 28 and St. 

MAJESTIC (Orln Stair, mgr.; 8. A H.).— 
Life's Shop Window, first half; The Penalty, 
last half. CHAS. R. ANGELL. 



HAMILTON, OHIO. 

8MITH'S (Tom A. Smith, mgr.).— 29, Nell 
O'Briens' Minstrels, to good business; 30-6, 
Hlmmellens' Associated Players, dramatic 
stock. 

GRAND (J. E. McCarthy, mgr.; Gus Sun; 
rehearsals Sun., Tues. A Thurs., 10). — 29-80. 



Kathryn Maddox Wayne 



WAYN 



In the Intensely Interesting and Notably Different Comedy Dramatic Playlet 

\A/HEIM NA/ITT NA/OIM 

A Natural, Real and Up-to-date Sketch. A CLASSY OPENING I A HOLDING MOTIVE and a SURPRISE FINISH I 

We do not claim that it is a "riot." We have never believed that it would "stop the show." BUT we DO KNOW that it appeals to the Intelligent, and can be understood bv 

the other class. We're "A Bit of a Guess, and a Twiddle of Thisum. 
Representative, MR. EDWARD SMALL, PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Wh4n anttcering adoertUem«nt9 kindly ntion V-RIBTY 




VARIETY 



15 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT 



rse»« n§7 

Aeae#wio-«go<l 

petes 8e "top »t la 

Row York City. 
On* block from the Book- 
ing Qffleoo. VAR1KTY and 
the rat Casey Agency. 



6f 



THE ST. KILDA 



9 



ea Horn* far 



St 



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iths and ovary 
eeavoaienee. 



ow at 67 W. 44th Street 



51 

Jennie Dev 
0o.; 1-1. M« 
ltn; 1-1, M 
lay; kkainei 



PAULINE COOKE and JENIE JACOBS. Proprietors 



Deweeie A Cuba, Francis Bryant A 
Morgan A Emraerson, James H. Cul- 
ary Ann Brown, Hallsn 4k Beerk- 
jkainesB good. QUAD. 

HAVERHILL, MASS. 
COLONIAL (L. B. Mayer, mgr.; U. B. O.). 
—80-1, The Conders, pleased ; DrsWett A 
Hepp4 liked; Colonial Players, fine; Caraon 
Brown, 



applause; Ye Olde Home Choi re, 

■t. Mile. 
Players, 



rood; 1. "The Million.", big sale; 1-8. Mile. 
rieurette. The Sharps, Colonial 



testes A Werner, Chas. Ledegar. 



"CHIMB." 



LINCOLN, 

OLIVER (F. C. Zehrung, mgr.). — 18, The 

Roserfr, good business; 27-28. Ready Money. 

good tlouses; 30, Gertrude Ewlng Company. 

ORPHEUM (L. M. Gorman, mgr.). — Flying 

Weavers, pleased; Wilson Brothers, solid hit; 

Raynere Keene A Co.. liked; Ed. Wynn, very 

.Lester, excellent; O'Meers Bisters A 

Lsed. 

(L. M. Gorman, mgr.). — Johnson, 



food; 



m 

m j 



Johnson, fine; Oberman Trio, novel, 
liked! Enol, hit; Rondos Trio, very good. 

LEE LOGAN. 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 

TRRNTON (Trent Bros., mgrs.; U. B. O.; 
.•ehenrtals. Mon. A Thurs., 10).— 18-18. Harry 
Boutejjt A Co., clever; Paula Reeves, pleased; 
The ¥reat Monohan, able: Austin A Garvin, 
•cored; 28-28. Douglas A. Flint A Co.. scored; 
Barrow A Mllo, encores; Snowle Maybelle, 

rood; Alt Rlpon, hit. 

' TREVELYAN BABER. 



MACON, GA. 

GRAND (Jake Wells, mgr.; U. B. O.).— 
Week, 18. Herbert A Goldsmith, good; Edna 
ErskTne A Co., line; Paul Stephens, scored; 
HSrrt HoJraan A Co.. great; Kennedy A Mack, 
•lever; Farnum A Delmar. hit; Musical 

faldths. strong; Pelham, excellent. 
PALACE (J. B. Melton, mgr.).— Duncan 
k Holt, black face, great. 

i MAJESTIC (J. B. Melton. ™*£X~£?~ X * 
liltlrt, good. ANDREW ORR. 

. t MERIDEN, CONN. 

' Pdtlt'B (R. B. Royce, mgr.; Church).— 
tiafl A Corbley. hit; Ginger Trio, good; 
^1 A Bsndy. fair; Great Bensley. 
»*el»T; 8-4. Capt. Brunswick's Wild West 
'o.iLs Beuff Bros.. Helene. De Grace A De 
>aull: 6, "Officer 888." 

MONTREAL. 
OR RHEUM (G. F. Drlscoll. mgr.; U. B. O). 
L-J«sJb Busley Co.. Mr. A Mra Darrou In 
hla FTtw York; Brenner A Ratcllff. Leu Anger. 
Immy'i Pets. Cootnbi A Aldwell. 
»HIB MAJESTY'S (H. O. Brooks, mgr.: K. 



7, George Arliss In 



iHlL 
, f),). — spring Maid; 
Ditrneli " 

5RtNCE8S (H. C Judge, mgr.; Shuberts). 
ItAdness of Virtue; 7. Bunty Pulls the 

I OAYETY (H. F. Arnold, mgr.; Eastern 
fas*!),— New Ben man Bhow A Watson Bls- 
tsrffT, Midnight Maidens. 

FRANCAI8 (J. O. Hooley. mgr.; Loew).— 
Bassj&all Four. May Blossom French Stock 
CA^rferry I. Lauber. Mary C""**" £o.. Im- 
MHAi Trio. SHANNON. 



Heart 

of 
Times 
Square 



Fitzgerald Building S. £. Corner 
Broadway and 43d Street 

Single Offices, Suites or Entire Floor* 

Adjoining Cohan's Thoatre 

For Theatrical Offices or 
Theatrical Supply Shops 
it is not only the best 
location in New York, but 
the best location in the 
world. 

Your own broker or . 
Simon Lederer, Afest. on Premises 
Phone 5196 Bryant 



A Real Proprietor of a 
Real Place to 



LEONARD HICKS 
rASSBfflK HOTEL GRANT 



WHEN PLAYING BOSTON 




FURNISHED 
SUITS* 

Oomplstsly furnish- 
ed, including dishes 
and linen, two and 
three lane rooms, 
bath and kitchen* 
ette. phone, steam 
heat, fflevetnr ser* 
viee. SlO**l8 par 
wo«k ; seen tn mo* 
dating four persons. 



IIS MIMTU AWE. 



•ft** 



KIRTUND HOUSE 

62 SUMMEI ST.. LTM. MASS. 

tUttOFCAM P1AM 

eaty betel ■ tee city esvias rasas witk ertvstt bsta 



Dad's Theatrical Hotel 



ZEISSE'S HOTEL 



Phi Ion* 1 Iptriew Pa. 



ST. LOUIS 

REGENT HOTEL, 100 N. 14th 

NEW REGENT HOTEL, 101 N. 14th 

E. B. CAMPBELL, Pros* one Mgr., 

Wklto Bats' ■eseaeertore 
Tea) set as tea' walk ta all theatres 



-A Taaatrtral Mstst of the Sfteuoff Ulaes" 

COOKE'S HOTEL 

Walnut Street, aeevo Blghth. Philadelphia, 

opposite CneJaa T8m 
Cafe Oaaaret every 



WALKER HOUSE rM Ja'S! ,D 



SO West Eagle Street 

BurrtLo. n v. 

Hr. all f aeetrea. Bell Ph. or *ea*«a SS44 W 



HOTEL VIRGINIA 

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RATES, $1.00 up; with bath, $1.50 up 

Special Rates and attention to professional people. Our restaurants are 
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NEW PARK HOTEL, Madison, Wis. 

F. R. McVEITY, Manager 



WAVERLY HOTEL 

-IAOKSONTTLLB. TLA. 
Caters to the TheatrtenJ Prefesstata, Special 
Bate. Centrally located In the heart ef the 
elty. Private Baths. Cafe a he Carte. 
'baa m eets all trains. 

MBS. l.rCK WTLSOM. 



••FULLER-GOLDEN" 

APABTMEMTS 

Just completed with elegantly furnished 
two and three room snltes. Reception 
room, amasement and billiard rooms, sun 
parlor, elevator, main line telephone In 
each apartment. 

71S Rlicel Street. LOS AngtltS 



FL0RENZ HOUSE 

51 W. SSth St., near Herald Sq. 
Rooms, SS up. With board, 88 to 810 

per person. 
Good rooms, good location, sad Mme. 

Florens's own cooking, 
f'hone. 270* Greeley. 



THE DELBAR 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
SSS B. BBOAO ST. 

lean Plan. The roSne d heme for 
pro- f loat t ea Is. Heme Cooking. 
B ates SS ta IS per weak. 
C. A. TOCNO, Prep. 



Light's Restaurant 

*4 uogan st., Jacksonville- Fla. 

OUB MOTTO 

Cleanliness Prompt Service 

Moderate Prices Good Coffee 

Opposite Hotel Seminole. 

Theatrical patronage Invited. 



W. V. M. A.; rehearsal. Mon., 10).— Max 

Bloom In "The Bunny Bide of Broadway," 

good hendllner; excellent vaudeville show; 
uuBlness good. W. R, ARNOLD. 



MUNCTE, IND. 

STAR (Ray Andrews, mgr.; Que Bun; re- 
hearsal. Mon., 10.80).— Eddie Malle. pleased; 
Newport Best, big; The 4 Bonnell's. pleased; 
Menlo Moore's Mother Goose Girls, big hit. 

GEO. FIFBN. 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. 8tewart. mgr.; U. B. 
O. ; rehearsal. Mon.. 9). — Joe Welch, amused; 
The 8 Steppers, stepped some; 8am Harris, 
entertained; Carrie Reynolds, hit; Lydia A 
Albino, equlllbrlzed; Woodwards Posing Dogs, 
excellent; Hart A Johnson, scream; T. J. 
Ryan-Rlchfleld Co*, always welcome. 

LYRIC (F\ P. Proctor, mgr.). — The Bea- 



bright Players In "Cold Storage," capable; 
"Maximo." well; 8 Follies, funny; McDonald 
A Tocalato, good; The Bells, fine; Basil 
Brady, o-k; Rose Gordon & Co., a hit. 

WASHINGTON (O. R. Neu. mgr.; Fox).— 
Harry Lay ton & Co.. hit; Lillian Lea Trio, 
very good; Morgan & Davis, good; Rows A 
Clinton, comic; James A Francis, amuse; 
Belle Gold, pleased. 

ODEON (Charles Burtls. mgr.; U. B. O.). 
— iRose A Montrose, scored; Hurst-Watts A 
Hurst, good; Lambert A Van, scored; Chas. 
Hecton, comic; Grace Anderson, hit In song. 

ARCADE (L. O. Mumford. mgr.; direct). 
— Helene Lease, clever; Aleck A Co., funny; 
"Mother A Father at the Box Office," greet- 
ings; Vivian Viola, pleased; Jack Oliver, hit; 
The De Tyson Sisters, charmed. 

8HUBERT (Lee Ottelengul. mgr.).— "Lit- 
tle Boy Blue," drawing well at the start. 

NEWARK (Geo. Robblns, mgr.). — Geo. Ar- 
liss In "Disraeli." doing nice. 

JACOBS (Geo. Jacobs, mgr.). — Marie Beau- 
garde In "The Parisian Model," drawing. 

ORPHEUM (M. S. Schlesinger, mgr,).— 
"The Hypocrites," god business. 

GAYETY (Leon Evans, mgr.).— The Gay 
Masqueraders" are getttng them here. 

MINERS (Frank Abbott. mgr.). — "The 
Bta-s of Stageland" with Odlva as feature, 
doing good business. JOE O'BRYAN. 



NBW HAVEN, CONN. 

POLI'S (8. Z. Poll, prop.; L. D. Garvle. 
mgr.; U. B. O. ; rehearsal, Mon., 10). — Kalmar 
A Brown, many encores; Donovan A McDon- 
ald, entertained; Galloway A Kaufman. In 
"Little Mother." well received; Miss Hilda 
Hawthorne A "Johnny," very good; Three 
Alex, equilibrists, splendid; Wills A Burt, 
the song writers, entertained; Ollle Young A 
April, opened. E. J. TODD. 



ONBONTA. 

ONEONTA (Geo. A. Roberts, mgr.; U. B. 
O. ; rehearsals, Mon. A Thurs., 12.80 p. m.). — 
26-28, Telephone Girls, fair; Markee Bros., 
Von Klein A Gibson, good; The Par sh leys, a 
hit; S-6, Adelaide Hermann, Casey A 8mlth; 
capacity. DELONO. 



PATERSON, N. J. 

MAJESTIC (W. H. Walsh, mgr.; U. B. O. ; 
rehearsals, Mon. A Thurs., 11). — Temple A 
Huff, good; DeAlma A Mae, good; Doncourt 
A Mack, funny; Three Escardos. great; 8*6, 
The Belmonts, Victor Hyde. Mills A Moulton. 
Josephine Saxon and Her Picks; capacity 
business. 

ORPHEUM (Chas. F. Edwards, mgr.).— 
80-2, The Moulin Rouge; 8-6, The Girls from' 
Reno; big houses. 

EMPIRE (Floyd Lauman, mgr.). — 80-8. The 
Winning Widows; 3-6, Bowery Burlesquers. 

LYCEUM (Chas. F. Wilbur, mgr.).— 80-8. 
The Girl In the Taxi. DAVID W. LEWIS. 



PBNHACOLA, FLA. 

PEN8ACOLA OPERA HOUSE (Nick Smith, 
mgr.). — 23. Balkan Princess, good business; 
24, The Confession, fair business; 86, Polly 
of Circus, good business. 

DAVE 8. CASHMAN. 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.; U. B. O.). — 
Sidney Drew A Co.. splendid; Mclntyre A 

Seath, big hit; Harry Breen, applause; Josle 
eather, good; Gordon Highlanders, pleased; 
Daring Darts, thrilling; Farber Sisters, neat; 
Ferrel Bros., amusing. 

HARRIS (John P. Harris A Harry Davis, 
mgrs. ; U. B. O). — Harry Botter A Co.. scored; 
Bennett Sisters, hit; Lewis A Chapln. clever; 
Leonard Kane, pleased; Frencelll A Lewis, 
splendid; Brown A Lswson, very good; San- 
dros Bros., clever; Williams. Lean A Will- 
iams, good; Charlie Walton, flne. 

KENYON (Titus Kenyon. mgr.; Pollock). 
— Captain Webbs, Vernetta-Clark. Belle Wil- 
ton, Lawlor A Pultler, Allen, Byron A 
I Blanche, Geraldlne Ashcroft. 

FAMILY (John P. Harris, mirr. ; U. B. O.). 
— Colemans, Baro A Baro, Shaw A Lee, Vollo 
Brothers. Bessie Allen, Great Wellington, 
Pearl Buhl. Musical Notes. 

ALVIN (John P. Reynolds, mgr.; Shubert). 
— "Little Women." 

NIXON (Thos. B. Kirk, mgr.; K. A E). 
—"The Rose Maid"; 7. Henry Mills. 

LYCEUM (C. R. Wilson, ma;r. ; S. A H.) 
— "Where the Trail Divides"; 7. "The 
Rosary." 

DUQUEPNE (Harry Davis, mgr. ).— Stock. 

GAYETY (Henry Kurtzmin. mgr.). — Ben 
Welch's Burlesquera 



Jos. Marsh of f'hicngo. mannger <»f the 
"Sinking; of the Titanic." dropped dead, as he 
concluded his lecture In the Pittsburgh Ex- 
position, on last Thursday. 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 

THE BIJOU (George Hickman, mgr.),--. 
28. "The Call of* the Heart," good show; 80, 
r A Mart's Game." 

THE ORPHEUM (George Hickman, mgr.; 
U. B. O. ; rehearsal. Moo.. 10J.— Mary. Bar- 
ley's "Bull Dog Music Hall," big applause; 
Minnie Vlctorson. sketch, scored; George Wil- 
son, big hesdtlner; Ernie A Ernie, very good 
opening performance to- big business. 

THE PRINOES8 (Harry Sudekum, mgr.; 

WBea ttieioerinp' au c . 




CHERRYOLA 



(Grease Rouge) 
25 cents per jar 

For STAGE MAKE-UP or Street Use 

For LIPS OR CHECKS, a perfect blood color 

THE HESS COMPANY 

Manofacturers Stage Mahe-Up ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



entB .'..ntfjy mentton VARIETY. 



36 



VARIETY 



i 



Buckleys Animals 

THIS WEEK (Sept. 30), ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN 



Joe Mackrell, Jr.. la now press agsat for 
the new Harris Theatre; Ed. R. Salter la 
house manager. 



Wayne Campbell is one of the new addi- 
tions to the personnel of the Davis Stock 
PI ay era 8 1 NOLI AR. 



PORTLAND, MB. 

PORTLAND (I. P. Mosher, mar.; U. B. O.: 
rehearsal, Mon., 10.10). — Reckless Recklaw 
Trio, clever; Jeanette Chllds, fins; afunaon 
A Forrest, excellent; Earls A Bartlett, hit; 
John J. Black A Co.. plsaaed. 

GREELEY'S (James W. Greeley, mfr.; 
Inde'pt; rehearsals, Mon. A Thura., 10.10). — 
10-S, Hanley A Jarvla. scream; Mill* DeBeau* 
clalr, excellent; Maekay A Rollins, pleaaed; 
3-6. Verrona, Claire A Wast; one to fill. 

JEFFERSON— tO-l-I. "The Common Law*'; 
6, "Over NlfhL" 

NEW PORTLAND— John J. Black A Co., 
Marlon lfunson. supported by Hal Forrest, 
"Kidnapping of Blanca"; Reckless Recklaw 
Trio. Jeanette Chi Ida. Earla A Bartleea, The 
Oreelya, Hanley A Jarvls, Mary Keousjh, 
Mackey A Rollins. M. E. ROSBN. 

BEADING, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Wllmer A Vincent, mgra.; U. 
B. O.; rehearsal. Mon. A Thura., 10.10). — 



BILLY 



"SWEDE" 



HALL 



with JENNIE COLBORN and CO. 

Hit this Week Hammerstein's 

Next Week (Oct. 7), Poli's, Waterbury, Mass. 

Booked Solid 
Direction LOUIS WESLEY 





1-1 DANA/SON 

The Joyful comedian and sons; writer. 

Touring; the Sulllvan-Consldlne Circuit. 

Author of "Good Night Mr. Moon," "Pucker Up Your Lips Miss Llndy," "Hear Those 

Chimes." "Come with Me to Honey Moon Land," etc. 



ST. PAUL, MINN. | . 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mar. J di- 
rect). — "The Drums of Oude." excellent, btfhly 
appreciated ; May Tully, very good ; John 
Spersel, local, pleasing; Lew Cooper, pleased; 
Flying Martins, fine; Reidy A Currier, 
pleased; Great Libby, good. 

EMPRESS (Sulllvan-Consldlne).— "No. 44." 
good; Ell Dawson, good; Brooklyn Harmony, 
pleased; Theo. Carly's Canines, pleased; 
Three Stanleys, very good. 

MAJESTIC — Kronenman Broa, good)? Syl- 
vester A Vance, good; Willard, fine; Paul 
Azard Troupe, fine; May Kllroy, fair. 

PRINCESS — Rapoli. Jos. Kettler A Co., 
Kirk A Forgerty, Lew Wells. S Wayjms. 

GAIETY— 30-2. Three Hylands. Jack • Jes- 
sle Gibson. Mabel Milton, Eul & Lavigtie Sis- 
ters. Staers, Zano. 

ALHAMBRA— 30-2. The Engfords. In gal Is. 
Buneld A Ingalls, Dexter A Lamout . Ml 

METROPOLITAN— "Putting It Ov#f*< 7* 
Dustin Famum. *. 

8HUBERT— "Baby Doll"; 7. The > White 
Squaw. \ , 

GRAND— "The Dandy Glrla" ' , 

C. J. BENMAM. 

SALT LAKE. 

ORPHEUM— Week 22. Chick Sale, kit of 
blli; Johnson's Travelogues, decidedly later- 




STUPENDOUS SUCCESS 



WEST 



Eddls Howard, liked Horton A Lewis, laughs; 
Claude A Marlon Cleveland, good; S Bohe- 
mians, very good; Lawn Party, well re- 
ceived. 

HIPPODROME (C. O. Keeney, mgr.; Pru- 
dential; rehearsal, Mon. 4k Thura.. 10.10).— 
Robin A Co.. liked; Walter A Vivian, laughs; 
Rita Marschan, pleased; 4 Gardiners, nicely; 
Nellie Eltlng A Co., very well. O. R. H. 



ROCKLAND. ME. 

ROCKLAND (Al. V. Rosenberg, mgr.; U. 
B. O. ; rehearsal, Mon. 4k Thura, 11). — 
Thomas & Ward, good; Cycling Zanoras, fine: 
3-6. Johnny Gelger, Lighter A Jordan. 

A. C. J. 



ST. JOHN, N. B. 

OPERA HOUSE (D. H. McDonald, mgr.). 
—23-28. Royalty Trio; pictures; to-2."The 
Fortune Hunter." 

NICKEL (W. H. Oolding, mgr.).— Ines Mil- 
ler, Floyd Baxter, plcturea 

LYRIC (Steve Hurley, mgr.). — 2I»2B, Burns 
Sisters: 26-28. Robins A Tremaine; pictures. . 

L. H. CORTRIOHT. 



FOUR SONG HITS 

"ISN'T SHE THE BRAZEN THING" 

44 IT IS AN AWFUL EASY WAY TO MAKE A LIVING" 

44 INTERNATIONAL RAG SONG" 

"GOOD NIGHT NURSE" 

All Written by THOMAS J. GRAY 
Music by W. RAYMOND WALKER 

AT HAMMERSTEIN'S THIS WEEK <**»> 



— — 



CHRIS O. BROWN 



PRESENTS 






FRANCES CLARE 

AND HtfR 

8 LITTLE GIRL FRIEND^ 

IN "MARY'S PARTY" \\'i\ 

with GUY RAWSON / 

ALL BOOKED 

Direction, CHRIS O. BROWN. 

. i 



estlnf; Burr A Hope. *reat; La Vler. sister ; 
W. H St. James & Players, fair; KsthJlQul* 
tlni. food: food business. 

EMPRESS— Week 25. 3ullivan A Be 
hit; The Sombreros, good; Leona Q 
pleased; Curry & Riley, fair; Billy 
ordinary; "La Petite Gosse," passed; b 
ness. 

SALT LAKE— 84-18, "The Round-Up. 
' Macklyn Arbuckle. Opened to good b 
Good show. 

COLONIAL— It. Mack-Rambeau 
"The Man from Home." O 

SAN DIEGO, CAI* 

EMPRESS (Wm. Tomklns, mfr.; S-C. 
hearsal, Mon.. 10). — 28. Fredk. Wallac 
Co.. food; Jack Allraan, hit; Joe 
pleased; Von Hampton A Jossellyn, 
Lowe A Edwards, applauded. 
PANTAGE8 (Scott Palmers, mgr.; dli 
, Mon.. 10). — Four Casters, thrilled; Can! 
' Merry Kids, funny; Matthews A Duffy, 
well; John P. Rovers, very good; Harris 
Everett, food. 

PRINCESS (Fred Balllen, mfr.; Bert Lei 
Mon., 10).— The Newmans, pleased; Adolpht 
' toed; Hallet A Co., food. 



DO YOU WANT REALLY GREAT SONGS? LOOK THIS LIST OVER 

"LOVE ME UNTIL THE END" A beautiful ballad by Pendlebury and Dauterich. Too many already using it to name them. The big hit of Dumont's Minstrels. 
"GRACE MY SWEETHEART GRACE" Charming Waltz by Llbbe y and Trayer. "A bona-fide meritorious success. The best straight sentimental waltz ballad of today." 

"WHEN THE CANDLE LIGHTS ARE GLEAMING 91 One of our own and a real winner. WiU be our "Silver Threads" while great home songs last. 
"SHINE ON, MR. MOON," and "AS THE DAYS GO BY" Gems by Robert M. Stults, the author of "Sweetest Story Ever Told," "Fancies" and other song dreams- 
"RAGIANA MELODY" Just what the title implies. One of the real raggy 6ongs you need to make a hit with. 



You Cannot Afford To Bo Without These 

Send for Professionals, etc If not on our Hot, send 

program, or six oents postage. 



M. D. SWISHER, I 15 So. Tenth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Who*. aMturtring oWeVftaftrto*** \indly mention "VAtOtfY 



VARIETY 



37 



■-.www sj* . nIS BOYS ? ? ? ? 

(Poor FRANK STAFFORD doing three a day) 

Will only remain £n New York City and immediate vicinity until February 9, 1913, as a SPECIAL HEADLINE FEATURE 
on the LOEW CIRCUIT. Don't forget ALL WEEK STANDS. Raihoad fares .05 (FIVE CENTS). 

\ COME IN, BOYS. THE WATER'S FINE 

FRANK STAFFORD AND 



Presenting "A MwlMT 

40 CONSECUTIVE WEEKS. HOW'S YOU'RE ROUTE 7 ? 






8PRECKLES (Dodge A Hay ward, nigra.). 
—23-25, Return of Siberia pictures. 



Quarantine has been raised against children 
under It on account of Infantile paralysis. 

Thompson & Snow Amusement Co., which 
recently sold Luna Park, Los Angeles, la re- 
ported to have secured a long lease at Ocean 
Bay Beach, a suburb. L. T. DALEY. 

SAVANNAH. OA. 

NEW SAVANNAH (William B. Beesklnd, 
mgr; Klaw & Erlanger). — Madame Sherry, 28, 
to good houses; The Quaker Girl, Oct. 4; 
Mutt A Jeff. 5; The Traveling Salesman. 8; 
Fields Minstrels, 9; Maude Adams, 11; Alma, 
15. 

THE LIBERTY THEATRE (Tedd Brackett, 
lessee and mgr.). — The Fortune Hunter, open- 
ing week, to capacity attendance; week Oct 
7. Wildfire. 

BIJOU (Corbln Shellds. mgr.; U. B. O. ; re- 
hearsal, Mon.. 11).— Capacity; T. W. Eckert 
A Maude Berg, In Blossoms, excellent; Cleary 
& Tracy scored big; Edna Ersklne A Co., 
big hit; Paul Stephens, excellent; Harry Aus- 
tin & Taps, pleased. 

Mr. Jake Wells is expected here this week 
to overlook Improvements made on his house, 
the BIJou. REX. 



SIOUX CITY. 

ORPHEUM (C. E. Wilder, res. mgr.; re- 
hearsal Sun., 10.30). — Flying Weavers, good; 
Muriel & Frances, good; Harry Atkinson. 
pletiBt-d; Raynore, Keene A Co., excellent; 
Lester, good; Joe Morris & Charlie Allen, 
very good; Robert DcMont Trio, good. 

DEAN. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 

ORPHEUM (A. J. Allardt, mgr.; W. V. M. 
A.; rehearsal. Mon. A Thurs.. 12.80). — 80-2. 
Ray L. Royce. applause; Models De Luxe, 
hit; Bush A Pyser, hit; Cora Bell Stewart, 
fair; Warren A Brockway. scored; 8-6, Whose 
Little Girl Are You, business good. 

AUDITORIUM (S. W. Pickering, mgr.; U. 
B. o.). — 29, Busy Iasy. fair business; 80-5, 
Wright Huntington Co., business good. 




GERTRUDE FAY 

of 

FAY 2 COLLEYS AND FAY 



HARRY TATE S & 

FISHING ^"MOTORING 



NEW YORK 
ENGLAND 
AUSTRALIA 
AFRICA! 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



II 



S8W TOM DAVIES TRIO 

Motoring in Mid-Air 

FIFTH AMERICAN TOUR. KEITH CIRCUIT. 

ENORMOUS 8UCCE88 THIS WEEK (SEPT .HO), BUSH WICK, BROOKLYN. 
NEXT WEEK ,<OCT. 7). BRONX. NEW YORK 

For Time: ALBEE, WEBER & EVANS 



Arrived Campania, Sept. 20 



1 Managers 
Press Agents 



Music Publishers 



$ 35 G0 

Complete 




Here Is a simple, Inexpensive, little machine that will do all your duplicating work, as 
well as more expensive machines, at the rate of fifty copies a minute. 

UNDERWOOD 

Revolving Duplicator 

Compact, neat, clean. Needa no special skill or experience to operate. Will not get out 
of order. Cannot make a mistake. Costs Uttle to maintain. Price Includes all appliances. 



WRITE FOR BOOKLET 



UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER CO., Inc. 

UNDERWOOD BUILDING Dopt. Q. NEW YORK CITY 

Bronchos In all Principal Cities 



OLIVER (8. W. Pickering, mgr.).— 26. 
Modern Eve. capacity house; 80-8, Busy Iisy. 
7, The Uttle Rebel. 

MAJESTIC (Ed. 8m!th. mgr.; F. Q. Doyle). 
— 80-6. Grace Meyers, fair; Ethel Van. hit. 

INDIANA (Thos. Moss, mgr). — Stock. Busi- 
ness fair. WM. H. STEIN. 



SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

POM'S (8. Gordon Wrlghter. mgr.; U. B. 
O. ; rehearsal, Mon.. 10). — Stelner Trio, opened; 
Benn Linn, passed; McMahon. Diamond A 
demons, good; Kate Watson, did well; Dolan 
A Lenharr, fair; Conlln, Steele A Carr. fair; 
Martlnettl A Sylvester, pleased; poor bill for 
opening week of vaudeville. 

GILMORB (P. F. Shea, mgr.).— 80-2. Jolly 
Follies, good show. 

COURT SQUARE (D. O. Gllmore. mgr.; 
InA).— 1-2. Wm. Hodge, In "The Msn from 
Home"; 8-6. Pink Lady; 7-9, Trail of Lone- 
some Pine. 



Stephen J. Breen. the retiring manager of 
Poll's, wn presented with a gold watch by 
his friends here last Saturday. He goes to 
Bridgeport In charge of Poll's there. He Is 
succeeded here by Gordon Wrlghter. 

GEO. PRE8BL. 



SYRACUSE. 

GRAND (Chas. Plummer, mgr.; Keith's. 
Vaudeville. Chas. Anderson, mgr.). — Archie 
Onrl A Miss Dolly, fair; Brltt Wood, well 
liked; Les Oougets. pleasing; Billy "Swede" 
Hall A Co.. well received: E Bert Kenny A 
K. Booth Piatt, very good; Hazard Short's 
"Dsnce Dream," clever; Keller Mack A 
Frank Orth, scored; Jungman Troupe, very 
good. 

EMPIRE (Martin L. Wolf, mgr.; Frederick 
Gage, local mgr.). — 8-4-6, The Woman; 7, 
Ben Hur. 

WIETING (John L. Kerr, mgr.; Francis 
Martin, local mgr.). — 7, Bunty Pulls the 
Strings. 

BA8TABLE (Stephen Bastable, mgr). — 
7-8-9, Geo. P. Murphy, The Merry-go-round- 
era. 

CRESCENT (John B. Breslln, mgr.).— 
Great Nichols, good; Bob Warrem: eccentric 
comedian; Kalma, Georgia Comedy Four, John 
A. West A Co. 




MASON 



frank 



DU TIEL 



Or p aami Theatre— Ethel Mason, an attrac- 
tive girl and Frank DuTlel give a glimpse 
of twentieth century vaudeville. There Is a 
dHsh about the act quite pleasing while Miss 
Muson's Instrumental work on the accordion 
In In artistic keeping with the whole. — "Com- 
mercial Appeal," Memphis. Tui-sday Morning, 
September 24. 1912. 

Keith's Theatre — Ethel Mason and Frank 
DuTlel aro novel entertainers. Miss Mason 
has a rich voice and \a heard to advantage 
In several selections while Mr. DuTlel is an 
artist on the accordion. — Louisville "Herald," 
Monday Morning. September 16. 1912. 




GEORGE 
HARADA 

World Famous Cyclist 
313 W. 4f tb St., New York 



I'LL GET MINE WHEN I GET HOME TONIGHT 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



A great comedy song, nothing suggestive, but a sure fire hit. Come early and be one of the first to use it 

Published by TELL TAYLOR 



1347 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



P. S. Mr. Taylor will be In the New York Office all winter 



WK+n - <»■ +m* r i*ff a4i*rU»+men4* kind m*nUo* VARIETY 



38 



VARIETY 




TKRRE HAUTE. IND. 

VARIETIES (Jack Hoeffler, mgr.; W. V. 
M. A.; rehearsal, Mon. A Thurs., 10). — Will 
ft Kemp, good; Perry ft Elliott, pleased; Bush 
ft Peyser, rood; Dolliver A Roger, food; 
Howard A White, pleased; Shannon A Gal- 
gano, good; Mason A Murray, good; Chas. 
Glbbs, hit; La Graclosa. novelty; The Devil 
A Tom Walker, hit; business good. 

GRAND (T. W. Barhydt. Jr., mgr.; K. A 
E. ).— 27. Kiss Walts, capacity; 2, Bousa's 
Band. 

PARK (Joe Barnes, mgr.). — 2*, Jersey Lil- 
lles. 

YOUNG'S AIRDOME (Sam Toung. mgr.). 
—29. Wizard of Wiseland. CHRIS. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea, mgr.).— Mme. Olga 
Petrova, a sensation; Henry Cllve, splendid; 
Ed. F. Reynard, big novelty; Romalo A Del- 
mora, good: The Bell Boy Trio, pleasing; 
Billy K. Wells, good; Rice, Sully A Scott, 
fine. 

MAJESTIC (Peter F. Griffin, mgr.). — Pow- 
er's Elephants, second week; Allon A Bar- 
rlngton, Victor Faust, Harris A Harris. Walk- 
er A West. 

STRAND (E. Weill, mgr.). — Margaret Cun- 
ningham, Master Ernest Morgan. 



The Arena Gardens will be formally opened 
week of 7 with a big musical festival. 



William Faversham A Co. will present 
Julius Caesar at the Ro/al Alexandra, 7. 

HARTLEY. 



TRENTON. N. J. 

STATE STREET (Herman Wahn. mgr.; 
Prudential; rehearsals, Mon. A Thurs., 11). 
— 30-2. Geo- Johnson, good; Four Dlzey Girls, 
hit; Murphy A Wllllard, good; Baker A Cook, 
pleased; "Sunny Days In Georgia," pleasing; 



OHt WHAT A WALLOP. 

Jack E. Magee 



AND 



Frances Kerry 

HANDED 'EM IN CHICAGO. 
Booked for nine mHUon years by the 

We We M« Ae 

THE FIRST MAN TO EVER WEAB A. 
RED VEST ON ANY STAGE. 

Variety, Chicago. 




8-5, Howard A Under, Frank Bros., Farley 
A Morrison, Gaultleri du Mars, Days in 
Georgia remain; business good. 

BROAD STREET (Geo. E. Brown, mgr.). 
— 80-6, Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch; 
7-12, The City; capacity houses. 

Jm— v/. VV. 



UTICA N Y 
8HUBERT <V. P. Whltaker, mgr.; U. B. 
O.). — Montambo A Wells. good; Wilbur 
Sweatman. good; Adler A Arline, very good; 
White A Perry, hit; Sully Family, fair; Doc. 
O'Neil, fair; Romany Opera Co., ulniflng hit. 

VIRGINIA, MINN. 

LYRIC (Henry Slgel. mgr.; W. V. M. A. 
rehearsal. Sun. A Wed.. 12). — 22-.M, Vernon 
clever; Marcklee A Flnlay. good; Frank Rut 
ledge A Co., line; 26-28. The Dreamers, good 
Barrett A Earle, fine; Martini, artistic. 

ROYAL (R. A. McLean, mgr.; Webster: re- 
hearsal, Mon. A Thurs., 8.80). — 28-25. Stadium 
Trio, fine; Lester A Moure, good; 26-29, Cary, 
DeGray A O'Farrell, entertained; The Plow- 
ers. pleased. "RANGE." 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

GRAND (J. F. Small, mgr.). — 7, The County 
Sheriff. J. E. FOREMAN. 



W1LKES-BARRE, PA. 

GRAND (D. M. Cauffman, mgr.).— SO, W. 
H. Crane; 1-8, "Faust"; 4, "The Concert"; 
6, "Excuse Me." 

POLI (M. Saunders, mgr.). — Stock. 



YOUNG8TOWN, OHIO. 

PARK (L. B. Coo, mgr., Felber A Shea). — 
Stlckney Comedy Circus, good; Fltsslmmons 
A Cameron, funny; Tower Bros, and Da r row, 
fair; Edwlna Barry A Co., good; Oordon, 
Pickens A Co., clever; Black A White, ex- 
cellent. 

GRAND (John Elliott, mgr.; Stair A Hav- 
lin). — A Woman's Name, Sept. 80, Oct. 1-2; 
Smart Set, Oct. 3, 4, 5. C. A. LEEDY. 




* * 5 5S vv»^WM IIWQS MO 

Many. m/r/iN m/t • 




THERE',5 

Rp&orr 



^'//Af COMING 

The 
Cromwells 

England's 
Greatest Novel- 
ty Jugglers. 

Skill and 
Mystery. , 

Is IT a Man or 
Woman ? 

Perm. Address, 
Care of VARIETY 




4 HARMONY 
BOYS 



This Week (Sept. 80), Dockst*ders, Wil- 
mington. . 

Next Weak (Oct. 7), Springfield. Mass. 




NO 



rvi 



The Elliott 




ptse«n g "THE PALACE OF ORPHEUS" 

Just Returned from the Western Tour of the Orpheum Circuit. Meeting With Tremen- 
dous Success Wherever We Appear. . 

THIS WEEK (Sept. jo), COLUMBIA, ST. LOUIS 

NEXT WEEK (Oct. 7 ), MAJESTIC, MILWAUKEE 



■■MB 



WMs cnawmimit ogve. • .. onrn*s feimKy met..'fem VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



39 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK OCTOBER 7 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED 

The routes given from OCT. 6 to OCT. IS, Inclusive, dependent upon the opening 
and closing days of engagement In different parts of the country. All addresses are 
furnished VARIETY by artists. Addresses care newspapers, managers, or agants will 
not be printed. 

ROUTES FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK MUST REACH THIS OFFICII NO 
LATER THAN WEDNESDAY MORNING TO INSURE PUBLICATION. 

TEMPORARY ADDRESSES WILL BE CARRIED WHEN ACT 18 "LAYING OFF/' 



A. 

Adair A Dahn Springfield 111 

Adams. Samuel J Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

ADLER a„d ARLINE 

Next Week (Oct. 7), Orpheum, Harrisburg. 
"A NEW ll>KA." 

Abeam Agnes A Co Fair Lynchburg Va 
Altken Whitman Trio Orpheum Calgary Can 
Albutris A Millar Empire Birmingham 
Allan Luno Bertie US Central Oshkoah 
Alpine Troupe Ringllng Bros C R 
Alvln Peter H Dreeden Ohio 
Alwood Vera 17 W Bath NYC 
Andrews Abbott A Co 8962 Morgan St Louis 
Ardelle A Leslie 10 Broesel Rochester 
Armalns 5 Plasa Chicago 111 
Atwood Vera 17 W 58 N Y 
Ayres Howard 903 N 66th St West Philadel- 
phia 

Baader A La Velle Spring Grove Springfield O 
Bacon Doc Hi Henrys Minstrels 
Baldwin A Shea 847 Berry av Chicago 

Ballerini's Dogs 

WHIPS. NO COMMANDS. NO iAJtKS. 



MO 



Direction BEKHLRR BROS. 



Bsnsn Alfred W Girls From Happylaad B R 

BARBEE,HILL- CO. 

Direction, BEEHLKB BBOTHOl . 

Baraban Troupe 1304 Fifth av N Y C 
Barnes A West National Sydney Australia 
Barnold Chas Davor Dorf Switzerland 
Barron Geo 2002 Fifth av N Y C 
*»rrv A Black 1.123 Falrmount av Phlla 
Barteli A Garfield 2099 B 68 Cleveland 



6 BROWN BROS 

Fee lured thla Seaaoa with the Primrose 
and Dochetader Mlaurtrola. 

Brown A Brown 69 W lift N Y C 

Brown A Wllmot 71 Glen Maiden Mass 

Brydon A Hanlon 26 Cottage Newark 

Burbank A Danforth Berlin N Y 

Burke Minnie Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

Burt Wm P A Daughter 133 W 14 N Y C 

Byron Gleta 170 Blue Hill av Roxbury Mass 

C. 

Carmen Frank 465 W 168 N Y C 
Carmen Sisters 2188 Washington av N T C 
Carroll Chas 42P B Kentucky Louisville 
Carroll Nettie Crystal Milwaukee Wis 
Carrollton Mrs C O 1811 S Flower Los Angeles 
Case Paul 81 S Clark Chieago 
Chameroys 1449 41 Brooklyn 
Chandler Claude 219 W 68 N Y 
Chantrell A Schuyler 219 Prospect av Bklyn 
Chapman Sisters 1629 Mllburn Indianapolis 
Chase Dave 90 Birch Lynn Mass 
Chatham Sisters 308 Grant Pittsburgh 
Cheers A Jones 818 W 89 N Y C 
Cbubb Ray 107 Spruce Scranton Pa 
Chunaa Four 19 Loughborough Rd London 
Church City Four 807 W 46 N Y C 
Clalrmont Josephine A Co 246 W 128 N Y 
Clark A Ferguson 121 Phelps Bnglewood 
Clayton Zella Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Clifford Dave B 178 B 108 N Y C 
Close Bros 41 Howard Boston 
Coden A Clifford 21 Adams Roxbury Mass 
Collins Will E Girls from Happyland B R 
Compton A Plumb 2220 Emerson av Mlnnsap 
Connolly Bros 1906 N 24 Philadelphia 
Cook Geraldlne 670 Jackson av N Y C 
Corbett A Forrester 71 Emmet Newark N J 
Corelli A Gillette Sheas Buffalo Y 
Cosisllo A La Croix 813 Bwelng Kansas City 
Creasy A Dayne Orpheum Kansas City 
Cromwells 6 Dancroft Gardens London 
Cross A Crown 1119 Nevada Toledo 
Cross A Josephine Alhambra NYC 



AM JI fl ,J**!M. HG ' CROUCH m WELCH 



Lady Jnggter 
Direction BBKHLEB BROS. 

Barto A Clark 2221 Cumberland av Phlla 

Bartos Three Plaza San Antonio 

Behren Musical 02 Sprlngflsld av Newark N J 

Bell A Bell 37 John Bloomfleld N J 

Belmont Joe 70 Brook London 

Belsac Irving 209 W 12 N Y C 

Bennett Klute A King Jahukes Oafs Los Ang 

Bentleys Musical 121 Clipper San Francisco 

Berg Bros Orpheum Sacramento Cal 

Berliner Vera 0724 Ridge Chicago 

Beverly Sisters 0722 Springfield av Phlla 

Billy A Burns 809 Home Bronx N Y 

Bimbos 872 Lawe Appleton Wis 

Blssett A Weston Green st London Bng 

Black A Leslie 8722 Eberly av Chicago 

Blake A Amber 0th Av N Y C 

Bowers. Walters A Crooker Winter Garden 

Berlin Ger lndef 
Boyd A Allen 2706 Howard Kansas City 
Bradleys The 1814 Brush Birmingham 
Brennan George Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Breton Ted A Corlnne 114 W 44 N Y C 
Brinkleya The 424 W 39 N Y C 
Brltton Nellie 140 Morris Philadelphia 
Brooks A Carlisle 38 Glenwood av Buffalo 
Brooks Thos A Girls from Happyland B R 



Directien. M. 8. BRNTHAM. 

Croueh A Sohnell Royal Court Cleveland lndf 

D. 
Darrell A Conway Keiths Bronx NYC 
Dare A Martin 4801 Calumet Chicago 
Darrow Stewart Orpheum Montreal 
D'Arvllle Jeannette Philadelphia 
Davis A Cooper 1920 Dayton Chicago 
De Grace A Gordon 922 Liberty Bklyn 
De Leo John B 718 Jackson Milwaukee 
De Milt Gertrude 818 Sterling pi Bklyn 
De Vere A Roth 049 Beldea av Chicago 
Dean A Sibley 460 Columbus av Boston 
Deery Frank 204 West Bad av N Y 
Delmar A Delmar Keiths Philadelphia 
Delton Bros 261 W 88 N Y C 
Demonto A Belle Bnglewood N J 

*■ Diamond ** Brennan «■» 

Direction. M. «. Rentham. 

neva^rnTbTnTST'T^roa^ecr'pT'Trk I yn 
Dlckerson A Llbby 1269 Rogers av Bklyn 
Dodd Emily A Jessie 201 Division av Bklyn 



Donner A Doris 848 Lincoln Johnstown Pa 
Doss Billy 102 High Columbus Tenn 
Doyle A Fields 2348 W Taylor Chicago 
Drew Lowell B Stratford N J 

B. 
Earl Robert AFC Vardel Lumberg Utlca 
y*ny«w\A » Q^vloi- Rot ftft Rlfhmond Tnd 

ELINORE and WILLIAMS 

In "The Hunter and The Hunter-ess" 
Next Week (Oct. 7). Bronx. New York. 
Direction. MAX HART. 

Elinore A Williams Bronx NYC 
Elson A Arthur 406 E 149 N Y C 
Emelle Troupe 604 E Taylor Bloomlngton 111 
Emerald A Dupre National Sydney Australia 
Emmett Hugh J 300 W 72d st N Y C 
Engelbrotb W 2813 Htgblsnd av Cincinnati 
Espe A Roth Pantages Tacoma Washington 
Evans Bessie 8701 Cottage Grove av Chicago 
Evelyn Sisters 260 St James pi Bklyn 

F 
Falardsux Camilla Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Faversham William Royal Alexander Toronto 

Can 
Feman Arthur S Girls from Happyland B B 

ADFLE EDNA 

FERGUSON and N0RTHLANE 

ORPHKUM TIME. 
Direction, ALBBB. Y^EBKB A TANS, 

Ferguson Dick 68 W Bayonne N J 
Ferguson Frank 704 W 180 N Y C 
Fernandez Duo 1284 Lake Musksgan 
Fields Nettle 6802 8 Halsted Chicago 
Finney Frank Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Fltzsimmons A Cameron Majestic London Ont 
Flynn Frank D 60 W 123 N Y 
Forbes A Gowman 201 W 112 N Y C 
Ford Corinns Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Fords Four 1949 84 st Bensonhurst L I 
Fox A Summers 017 10 Saginaw Mlob 
Francis Wtllard 67 W 128 N Y C 
Frey Twins WIS Av N Y C 
Furman Radle 829 Beck st Bronx N Y 

O. 
Gaffney Bisters 1407 Madison Chicago 
Gardner Oeorgl 4646 Kenmora av Chicago 
Gates Barl Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Oaylor A Graff 388 Van Bursa Brooklyn 

GEORGIA TRIO 

ALBERT EVANS XBLL 
Direction BBKHLKR BROS. 

Glrard Marie 41 Howard Boston 

Gladstone A Talmage 140 W 40 N Y C 

Godfrey A Henderson Orpheum Minneapolis 

Golden Max Aldea Boston 

Gordon Bd M 6116 Drexel av Chicago 

Gordon A Barber 26 8 Locust Hagsrstown Md 

Gomans Bobby 400 So 6 Columbus O 

Oranat Louis M 788 Prospect svs N Y C 

Gray A Graham Vaudeville Club London 

Gray A Gray 1922 Birch Joplln Mo 

Green Ethel Orpheum Winnipeg 

Griffith John P Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

Oullfoyle A Charlton 200 Harrison Detroit 



Halls Dogs 111 Walnut Revere Mass 
Halson Boys 21 B 98 N Y C 

Halton Powell Co Colonial Indianapolis lndsf 
Haroourt Frank Girls from Happyland B R 
Harris Maude Girls from Happyland B B 
Hsrrlty Johnnie 708 Harrison av Scranton 
Hart Maurioe 108 Lenox av N Y 
Harvey A Irving 1008 Broadway N Y O 
Hawley Fred Orpheum Oakland Cal 
Hawthorne Hilda Poll Worcester Maes 
Hsydn Dunbar A Haydn Shurbert Utlca 
Henry Frank J Girls from Happylaad B R 
Henry Olrls 2826 Bo 71 Philadelphia 

Hill, Cherry and Hill 

In Grotesque Oddities (New Aet). 
Direction. BRBHLBR BROS. 

Herberts Ths 47 Washington Lynn 
Hill A Ackerman Moss Tour Bng 
Hillman A Roberts 016 B 11 Saginaw Mloh 
Hoffman Dave 2241 B Clearfield Phlla 
Holman Harry A Co Bijou Chattanooga 
Holmes Noxlne Trocsdero Burlesquers B R 
Holt Alf 70ft Fifth Milwaukee 
Hood Sam 721 Florence Mobile Ala 
Hopkins A Axtell Columbia St Louis 
Hopkine Lola Axtell Majestic Chicago 
Hopp Fred 826 Littleton av Newark N J 



Hippodrome 4 Bowery Burlesquers B R 
Howard Comedy Four 988 3 av Bklyn 
Howard Harry A Mae 222 8 Peoria Chicago 
Howard Jack Girls from Happyland B R 
Howard A White 3017 Grand Blvd Chicago 
Hoyt A Starks IB Bancroft pi Bklyn 
Hulbsrt A De Long 4416 Madison Chicago 
Hunter A Rocs Hippodrome Lexington Ky 

'■/ 

r. Fred Ireland 

VND HIS CASINO GIRLS 

Boeked Solid by BIMULER BROS. 

Inman Billy Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Irwin Flo 221 W 40 N Y C 

J 

Jansen Chas Bowery Burlesquers B R 

Jerge A Hamilton Savannah Ga 

Jarrell Company 8044 W Madison Chicago 

Johnson Great 207 W 87 N Y C 

Johnstons Musical Middlesex London Buff 

Juno A Wells 011 B 78 N Y O 

K. 

Kaufmanns The Haas Laku Newaygo Mich 

Kelsey Sisters 4882 Christians av Chieago 

Kenney A Holiia Howard Boston 

Kenton Dorothy Felix Portland Hotel NYC 

Keener Rose 438 W 164 N Y G 

King Bros 211 4 av Schenectady 

King r ur 200 N Kentucky av Atlantis City 

Klraoh The Great 828 18th Ave 

Knight Bros A Sawtelle 4400 Sheridan rd Chic 

Krone Arthur A Bessie 200 N 04 Philadelphia 



LA MAZE TRIO 

(8 Pewle uri S T»hu.) 
ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 

Lake Jas J Olrls from Happyland B R 

Lamont Harry 90 Clinton Johnstown N Y 

Lane Chris 4807 Kenmora av Chieago 

Lane Bddis 800 B 78 N Y 

Langdons Ths Keiths Philadelphia 

Lanlag Arthur Monte Carlo Olrla B R 

Lansear Wsrd B 282 Sehaefer Bklyn 

La Centra A La Rue 2461 1 av N Y 

La Fleur Joe Ringllng Bros C B 

Lashe Oraat 1611 Kater Phils 

Lawrence A Wright 06 Copelaad Roxbury Mas 

Layton Marie 201 B Indiana St Charles 111 

Le Roy Oeo 86 W 110 N Y C 

Leonard Ous 280 Manhattan av N T C 

Leells Blsle Trocadero Burlesquers B B 

Levy Family 47 W 129 N Y 

Linton A Jungle Girls 1980 to Pens Denver 

Lock woods Musical 188 Cannon PoughkaanaU 

London A Rlksr 82 W 98 N Y C 

Loroh Family Circus Schuman Berlin Oar 

Lowell A Drew Pantages Portland Ore 

Lowell Bather Drew Pantages Tacoma 

Lynn Oils Bowery Burlesquers B R 

Lynne A Hazzard Columbia Detroit 

Lutgen Hugo Empress Kansas 



MacDonald Dr Howard Bostoa 
Malloy Dannie 11 Olen Morris Toronto 
Manning Trio 104 N Wanamaker Phlla 
Mantambo A Wells Proctors Newark 
Mantell Harry Trooadero Burlesquers B B 
Mardo A Hunter Barrlson Waukegan 111 
Marathon Comedy Four 809 W 28 N Y 
Mason A Pearse Van Cortlandt Hotel N T 
Matthews Mabel 2981 Burling Chicago 
Mayer Arthur Monte Carlo Olrls B R 
Mayson Frank 808 Madison Minn 
MoConnell Sisters 1247 Madison Chicago 
McCuns A Grant 888 Beaton Pittsburgh 
McDuff James Majestic San Antonio 



JOCK 



cK A Y 



SCOTCH COMMDIAN. 
Who aeke for applause and gets it without 
asking, ever In Seetleao. Com.. Pst Casey. 

— ■— — — — ^— — — ■— — — — — — ■ ■ 

MoQsrry A Harris 821 Palmer Toledo 

McMAHON and CHAPPELLE 

Next Week (Oct. 7), Orpheum. Brooklyn. 
Ptrostloa, JBNIB JACOBS. 

McWatarsTTTyson^STr&oTkTyn""" " l ""^"" 
Methen Sisters 12 Culton 8prlngflsld Mass 
Meutber A Davis 342 B 86 N Y C 
Milliard Bros (Bo A Bill) Pantages Vancou- 






SOME SUCCESS at the ALHAMBRA IN PARIS, where they have just finished a four weeks' engagement. During this 

engagement they appeared at the CAFE DE PARIS as well by special request. 

Booked up for three years solid in England, and our personal representative is HARRY BURNS. 418 Strand. London 



JMaety mevKiaa TARIMTT. 



VARIITY 



Miller Larry Victoria Charleston S C 
Mooree Mite Orpbeum Jacksonville, Fla 

LILLIAN MORTIMER 

faodevllle— ('alto* Usee 
ALBBB. Wtm A »Tf ANg 

Musical Cllftons Lyric Butler Pa 
Musketeers Three 240 W 89 N T C 

N. 

Near? Bliee A Ross 40© E Main Bridgeport 
Nelser Henry Field Minstrels 

PAUL SSSv 

NEV1NS and ER WOOD 

Manage— ewt. Mas ■. Heyso, Paltosl Wane. 

Nsvlns A Brwood 240 17 sv Peterson lndef 
Nichols Nelson Troupe Julian Chicago 
Nonette 017 Fist bush av Bklyn 
Nosses Musleal New Brighton Pa 

0. 
O'Connor Trio 700 W Allegheny ar Phlla 
Ollle Young A April Poll New Haren 
O'Neill Trio Orpbeum Leavenworth 



Parker A Morrell 1R7 Hopkins Brooklyn 
Plerlot Francis Orpbeum Altoona Pa 
Powers Blsphants 740 Foreet av N T C 
Proctor Ada 1112 Haleey Brooklyn 



Qulnlan Josle 044 N Clark Chicago 



Ragtime Trio The Arcade Ml not N D 

Ralmond Jim 018 Dak In Chisago 

Rawls A Von Kaufman Keith's Columbus 

Redmond Trio 201 Haleey Bklyn 

Red way Joggling 141 Inspector Montreal 

Renalles The *<04 flatter Oan Praneleoo 

Roberts ■ 1861 Ohermaa av Denver 

Roberts A Downey 80 Lafayette Detroit 

Rogers Bd Olrls from Happyland B B 

Roller Henry 81 Trenton Bast Boston 



Rosenthal Don A Bro 101 Chnsnplaln Roebstr 



Sampsel A Rellly Colonial Norfolk Va 
Sohroder Carol Olrls from Happyland V B 
Scully Will PI Webeter pi Bklyn 
Sears Gladys Dante* Daughters B B 



ZELDA SEARS & 

Next Week (Oct. 7), Shea** Toronto. 
PlrerMoe) MAS HABT. 

Bel too Larry Oyadons Omaha 

Shew Bdlth Trooadero Bnrlseqnors B B 

Sherlock Prank 614 W 180 N T C 

Sherman A Do Forest Bijou Battle Creek 

Mich 
Shermane Two 262 ft Bmaaool Mobile 
Shields Sydney A Co Columbia 8t Louis Mo 
Simons Mnrray J Trooadero Bnrlosqnora B B 
Smith Los 28 Vienna Newark N J 
Springer A Church 8 Btthsr Terrace PlttaOi 
Stanley Harry Grant Hotel Chloago 
BtaaVey Stan 800 Bates Indianapolis 
Btaawood Davie 804 Bremen B Boeton 
Stein-Hume-Thomss Orpbeum Memphle Tenn 
Steppe A H 88 Barclay Newark 
Stereo* B J 480 Marlon Bklyn 
Stevens Psnl 828 W 2* N T 
Stewart Sisters Columbia St Louis Mo 
St Claire Annie Central Atlanta tndof 
Sullivan James P 800 Court Brooklyn 
Summere Allen 1000 W Division Chicago 



Temple Loella Olrls from Happyland B B 
Travsrs Billy Monte Carlo Girls B R 



Unique Comedy Trio 1827 Nicholas Phlla 
Unlvsrsal Pour 1700 Oroene av Bklyn 

V. 
Vsggss The Grand Circuit South Africa 
Valdsre Troupe Cyclists Plasa San Antonio 
Valentine A Bell 1401 W 108 Chicago 

VALENTINE and BELL 

Wheelers' "Jag on Wheele." 
Direction. BBBHLBB BBOB. 

Van A Bates 6 W 104 N T C 

Van Palls Sisters 614 W 180 N T O 

CHAS. and FANNIE VAN 



Vsn Horn Bobby 180 West Dayton 

Variety Comedy Trio 1616 Berth Indianapolis 

Vsss Victor V 06 Bishop Providence 

Venetian Berenaders 070 Blaekhawk Chloago 

Vernon A Parksr 187 Hopkins Bklyn 

Village Comedy Four 1019 Ring gold Phlla 

Vincent A Sieger 820 Olive Indianapolis 

Vino Val Rlngllng Bros O R 

violotta Jolly 41 Ltlpsigsr Berlin Ger 

w. 
Walker Musloal Rlngllng Bros O B 
Walker A 111 202 Warren B Providence 
Wslker A Sturn 66 Rallw'y av Melbourne Aus 
Wallace A Van 070 B 24 Peterson 
Ward A Bohlmsn Taxi Girls B R 
Wsrde Mack 800 W 70 N V 
Washburn Dot 1080 Mohawk Chicago 
Watson Billy W Olrls from Happyland B B 



KATE WATSON 



Watson Nellie Olrls from HappyLand B B 

Watson Sammy 888 8t Paula av Jersey City 

Weber ChaeD 820 Tanker Phlla 

Well John 6 Krnsstadt Rotterdam 

Wsls Cosper H Brills Hotel B 10 Phlla 

Weleh Harry Mono Carlo Girls B B 

Wslch Jas A 211 B 14 N Y C 

Walls Lew 218 Shawmnt av Orani Baplds 

Wsnrlck A Waldron 642 Lehigh allentowa 

West John A Co Grand Ilion N T 

Western Union Trio 2241 B Cienrfleld Phlla 

Weston Bdgar 240 W 44 N T O 

Weston Dan ■ 141 W 110 N T O 

Wheolere The 140 Montague Bklyn 

White Kane A White 80S Vermont Bklyn 



Whitney TUlle 80 Kans Buffalo 

Whittle W B Whittle Farm Caldwell N J 

WUkereoa John N 1720 Baltic av Atlantic city 

Herbert Wilians and Hilda WoUos 



Directions BBBHLBB BBOB. 



Williams Clara 8060 Tremont Cleveland 
Williams Chas 2020 Rotgers Bt Lonls 
Williams A Oilbort 1010 MaraOeld av Ohio 
Williams A Stevens 8616 Cslumst Chicago 
Wilson Aubrey 480 Bo 12 Newark 
Wilson Jack B 6400 Loom Is Chicago 
Wilson Lottie 2208 Clifton av Chloago 
Wilson Raleigh 210 N 22 Lincoln 
Wilson A Ward 2744 Grays Psrry av Phlla 
Wlnklsr Kress Trio Pair Brockton Mass 
Wlss A Milton Brannan Circuit New Zealand 
Wlzon A Oonley 80 Tecumeeh Providence 
Wood OILie 624 W 162 N T O 



Xavlere Poor 2144 W 20 Chicago 

T. 

Yeomen* Geo 160 W 80 N T C 
Young A April Poll Hartford 
Young A Sister Orpbeum St Paul 
Young A Young 216 W 111 N Y C 



Zanfrollaa 181 Brixton London 
Zla lag Trio 800 W a N Y 
EelaeBss W 4eVH T 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



WEEKS OCT. 7 AND 14. 

American Gayety Minneapolis 14 Gayety St 

Paul 
American Beauties Gayety St Louis 14 Gayety 

Ksnsss City 
Auto Girls Empire Brooklyn M Empire New- 

ark 

Besuty Youth A Folly Gayety Toronto 14 
Gerden Buffalo 

Behman's Show 7-0 Empire Albany 10-12 
Franklin Square Worcester 14 Caelno Boston 

Ben Welch's Burlesquers Empire Cleveland 
14 Gayety Toledo 

Big Gayety 7-9 Empire Peterson 10-12 Empire 
Hoboken 14 Cssino Philadelphia 

Big Review Star Cleveland 14 People's Cin- 
cinnati 

Bohemians Avenue Detroit 14 Star Toronto 

Bon Tons Music Hall New York 14 Murray 

Hill New York 
Bowery Burlesquers Gayety Newark 14 Gay- 
ety Philadelphia 
Cherry Blossoms Empire Chicago 14 Grand 

Milwaukee 
College Girls, Columbia New York 14 Star 

Brooklyn 
Columbia Girls Star Brooklyn 14-16 Empire 

Hoboken r7-10 Empire Peterson 
Cracker Jacks Murray Hill New York 14-16 

L O 17-19 Bridgeport 
Daffy Dills Standard St Louis 14 Buckingham 

Louisville 
Dandy Girls L O 14 Krug Omaha 
Dante's Daughters Eighth Ave New York 14 

Howard Boeton 



Dasslere 7-9 GUmore Springfield 10-12 Empire 
Albany 14 Gayety Brooklyn 

Follies Dsy Century Kansas City 14 Stand- 
ard 8t Louis 

Gay Masqueraderc Gayety Philadelphia 14 Mu- 
sic Hall New York 

Gay White Way Gayety Louisville 14 Gayety 
St Louis 

Gsy Widows People's Cincinnati 14 Empire 
Chicago 

Ginger Girls Olympic New York 14-10 Em 
plre Paterson 17-19 Empire Hoboken 

Girls Happyland Columbia Chicago 14 Stand- 
ard Cincinnati 

Girls Joyland Casino Brooklyn 14 Eighth Ave 
New York 

Girls Missouri Gayety St Paul 14 L O 21 
Krug Omaha 

Girls Reno Bowery New York 14 Empire 
Philadelphia 

Golden Crook Westminster Providence 14 
Gayety Boston 

Hastings Big Show Standard Cincinnati 14 
Gayety Louisville 

High Life In Burlesque Bronx New York 14 
Empire Brooklyn 

Howe's Lovemakers L O 14 Star A Garter 
Chicago 

Jaitl In de Paris Star Toronto 14 Lafayette 
Buffalo 

Jolly Follies Gayety Brooklyn 14 Olympic 
New York 

Knickerbockers Star A Garter Chicago 14 Gay- 
ety Detroit 

Lady Buccaneers Howard Boston 14 Grand 
Boston 

Marlon's Dreamlands 7-9 L O 10-12 Bridge- 
port 14 Westminster Providence 

Merry-Go Rounders 7-9 Bastable Syracuse 10- 
12 L O 14 Gayety Montreal 

Merry Maidens Grand Boston 14 Bronx New 
York 

Merry Whirl Gayety Toledo 14 Columbia Chi- 
cago 

Midnight Maids Gayety Montreal 14-10 Em- 
pire Albany 17-18 Franklin Sq Worcester 

Miss New York Jr Lyceum Washington 11 
Penn Circuit 

Mollis Williams Gayety Boeton 14-16 GUmore 
Springfield 17-19 Emlpre Albany 

Monte Carlo Girls Empire Philadelphia M 
Casino Brooklyn 

Moulin Rouge Trocadero Philadelphia 14 Em- 
pire Baltimore 

New Century Girls Krug Omaha 14 Century 
Kansas City 

Orientals 7-9 Columbia Scranton 10-12 Or- 
pbeum Paterson 14 Bowery New York 

Pacemakers Empire Newark 14-16 Orpheum 
Paterson 17-19 olumbla Scranton 

Queens Follies Bergere Folly Chicago 14 Ave- 
nue Detroit 

Queens Paris Gayety Pittsburg 14 Empire 
Cleveland 

Reeves Beauty Show Garden Buffalo 14 Co- 
rinthian Rochester 

RoblnHon Crusoe Girls Gayety Omaha 14 L O 
21 Star A Garter Chicago 

Roeebuds Grand Milwaukee 14 Gayety Min- 
neapolis 

Rose Seydells Casino Boston 14 Columbia New 
York 

Runaway Girls Corinthian Rochester 14-16 
Bastable Syracuse 1719 L O 21 Gayety Mon- 
treal 

Social Maids Gayety Washington 14 Gayety, 
Pittsburg 

Star ft Garter Gayety Kansas City 14 Gayety 
Omaha 

Stars of Stageland 7-9 Orpheum Peterson 10- 
12 Columbia Scranton 14 Trocadero Phila- 
delphia 

Taxi Girls Gayety Baltimore 14 Gayety Wash- 
ington 

Tiger Lilies Penn Circuit 14 Star Cleveland 

Trocaderos Gayety Detroit 14 Gayety Toronto 

Watson's Beef Trust Emlpre Indianapolis 14 
Folly Chicago 

Whirl of Mirth Empire Baltimore 14 Lyceum 
Washington 

Winning Widows Casino Philadelphia 14 Gay- 
ety Bsltlmors 

World or Pleasure 7-9 Empire Hoboken 10-12 
Empire Paterson 14 Gayety Newark 

Yankee Doodle Girls Buckingham Louisville 
14 Empire Indianapolis 

Zallah's Own Lafayette Buffalo 14-16 Colum- 
bia Scranton 17-19 Orpheum Paterson 




HERE'S A NEW ONE 



EDGAR ALLEN-M.S.EPSTIN,.. 



1482-80 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



ROOMS 1012-1U2A PHONE 7008 BRYANT 

FITZGERALD BLDG. 



VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS AND PROMOTERS 

WRITE WIRE CALL PHONE 

WE CAN BOOK YOU RIGHT AWAY 



MR. EDOAR ALLEN (formerly of Weber A Allen) 
Offloe and Business Manager 



LETTERS 



Where C followe name, letter is In Chi- 
sago. 

Advertising* or circular letter* of any 
description will not be listed when known. 

P following- name Indicates postal, ad- 
vertised once only. 



POLI'S. SCRANTON. 



Abbotts The (C) 
Act Beautiful 
Adair A Dann 
Adams Fay 
Alexandria Max (C) 
Allyn Amy 
Alvaradod (C) 
Apollo Trio 
Areola (C) 
Arnold Jack 
Arnoldo Mr 
Asabl Klchl 
Ayers Ada 

B 

Babcock Theo 
Baker Alice H 
Baker Ray 
Baleer A H 
Barnes H D (C) 
Barnes A Robinson 
Barron T S (C) 
Barry Edmond 
Barry Jlmmle 
Barry Marlon 
Beaumont Arnold 
Beats William 
Bedford A Winchester 
Belmont Dollle 
Bennect Klute A 

King 
Bernle Mrs L 
Bernlvlcl Bros 
Bergere Rose (P) 
Betts Billy 
Booth Hope 
Bixlev Edgar 
Bornholdt Emma (C) 
Boyne Hasel 
Brant Cbae 
Brlce Charlie 
Brown Al 
Brown Both well 
Browning Bessie (C) 
Browning Lillian 
Budd Bert 
Bundmaster Victor 



Caputo Frank 
Carson Evelyn 
Cassel Lillian 
Caswell A Arnold 
Cbartres Sinters A 

Holiday (C) 
Chase Billy 
Chester Ernest 
Cheeseman Joe 
Christopher Joe (C) 
Clark Evelyn (C) 
Clark Maude 
Clemens Bob 
Clifford Else 
Clifford A Frank 
Cloee Bros 
Codalre Harry 
Coleman Wm J 
Core John 
Costello A La Croix 
Courtney Mabel 
Courtney Cyril 
Craig W W 
Cromwells The 
Cross Grover 

D 
Dally Dorothy 
Dasbie Angela 
Davis Geo 
Davles J R 
Dazle La Belle 
Dean Wood Ella 
Deas, Reed A Deas 
Desmonda Millie 
De Lacey Mabel 
De Lisle A Vernon 
De Lorls Mrs (C) 
De Noyer Eddie (C) 
De Perrler Adelle 
Dempsey Jack 
Derllng Margaret 
Dervin J T 
Diana Dainty 
Downing Helen 
Doyle Johnny 
Drapers Tho 
Drew Sidney 
Dubson Charlie 
Duple Jeanette 
Duprez Fred 
Dunn Wm J 
Dunbar Buster 
Durle Helen (C) 
Duval Helen 
Dyso Jim 

B 
Edmond Grace 
Empress Marie 
Evens Ernest 
Evans Goo 
Edwards & Burns 
Edwards Tan Is 

F 
Fagan Barney (C) 
Fisher Wesley 
Fltzstubbe Maud 
Florence A Co (C) 
Foster Allan 
Folsom Robert 
Fowler Bertie 

Friendly Dan 
Fuller William 

G 
Garley Grace (C) 
George Alvln D 



George Mande 
Glenier M 
Gilbert Albertlna 
01 Idea Jlmmle 
Glrdella Earl 
leas in Violet 
Gordon Cecil 
Gordon Miss C 
Gordons The Flying 
Gould Rita 
Griffith Fred (C) 
Gwynne A Gossetle 
(C) 

H 

Hagan Martin 
Handy Sadie 
Hanlon Cbae 
Harris John 
Harris William 
Hart Billy 
Harvey John K 
Hassan Leslie (C) 
Hatch Warren 
Hawkins Jack 
Hendricks Mae Miss 
Herman Jack 
Herron Bertie 
Hobbs Lucy 
Hodgkln Gene 
Hoffman Max 
Hoope Guy 
Hoops Arthur 
Howard Chas 
Howard Mallge 
Howard Martin (P) 
Hyatt Lowey 



Jeter Chas R (C) 

K 
Kahl Sam 
Kathleen Mlse 
Kawana Bros 
Kay Harry 
Keane James 
Keene Mettle 
Keller Josle 
Kendall Ezra Jr 
Kershaw A Ivlns 
King Louis 
Knlsht Otis 
Kremka Toney 



Lamb Irene 
La Rains Prof 
Lawrence Gertrude 

(P) 
Lee Carter Virginia 
Leltzel Sisters 
Le Mar Ada 
Leslie Fay 
Leeso Mrs 
Lewis Van 
Llmis Lillian 
Llndbolme Chas (C) 
Lorgnorme Crepaux 
Louis King 
Lowell Mildred 
Luclo Lancton 
Lyon Dorothy 
Lyon Dorothy (C) 

M 
Manchester J H (C) 
Mandel Marie 
Marnell A Conslneau 
Marx Vera 
Mason Daisy 
Mathers John 
McCall Sturgle 
McCormlck A Irving 
McDonald Bobby 
McGlour Albert 
McGown Mary (P) 
Mclntyre J F (C) 
McMahon Tim 
Meehan William (C) 
Melrose Elmer 
Melton Frank 
Mendlzo M (C) 
Merrill Cora 
M«>rlou Clara 
Miller Jeannette 
Mills Lillian 
Mitchell Thomas 
Mllo Vic (P) 
Morris Jessie 
Moss Arthur 
Murphy Jack 
Morris Mike 
Morrlscy & Haulon 
Murphy W H 
Musette 
Musical Spillers Five 

N 

NVstor Ned (C) 
Neville Augustus 
N'ordon Atchle 

O 

O Connor Joseph (C) 
OTonnor Sisters (C) 
O'Donnell John 
O'Neill Emma 
Owene Flo 



Palmer Geo 
Palmer Minnie 
Parker Billy 
Pearl Violet 
Perrlgo Kitty (C) 
Pingree Helen 
Plsho Lillian 
Pratt Miss M 



Whm onwtsrtnf eAvertisetnonte fctneVy oionMo* YAMIMT7. 



VARIETY 



41 



THE FOX AGENCY 

EDWARD F. KEALEY, Manager 
212 WEST 42nd ST., NEW YORK Phone, 1247 Bryant 



IO 



City Tli eat re — Riverside* Theatre— Washington Theatre— Nemo 

— Gotham Theatre— Star Theatre— Dewey Theatre— Folly Theat 

Comedy Theatre— Grand Opera Houne. 

NEWARK:— Washington Theatre— NEW HAVEN: — Grand Opera H 



WEEKS IN NEW YORK CITY 

Playing Vaudeville*. 

BOOKING 



Ernest Edelsten 

VARIETY AND DRAMATIC AGENT. 

17 Green St., Leicester Square, LONDON, 

Sole Representative. 

John Tiller** Companies Walter C. Kelly 

Little Tlch. Two Bobs. Wee Georgle Wood. 

ALWAYS VACANCIES FOR GOOD ACTS. 



Hammerstein's 
Victoria 



AMERICA'S MOST 

FAMOUS VARIETY 

THEATRE 



OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 



WITH 



FRED M A R D The United Booking Offices 
■ p i Boston Branch 



162 TREMONT ST. 



BIJOU ARCADE BUILDING 



BOSTON, MASS. 



J. C. MARSHALL 

lias opened his Western Headquarters 
In the office of 

EDWARD LANG'S 

VAUDEVILLE EXCHANGE 

39 W. Adams St., Chicago, III. 

Where he Is busily engaged in 

PRODUCING 

A somber of Shows and Vaudeville Acts, 

Musical Comedies and Extravaganzas. 

NOTICE1 

Always a chance for useful people, and 

good chorus girls. 

CALL 

Can Use Few More Pay Shows, and 

CONCESSIONS 

ACTS OF ALL KINDS 

WRITE TO ABOVE AGENCY. 



SKETCHES 

Will take orders for a limited number of 
sketches, one to Ave people for $26.00. $10.00 
to accompany order, remainder on receipt of 
MSS. In ordering tell me exactly what you 
. want and I will mall sketch to you within 
ten days. One sketch on hand for sale or 
lease — "rflann of the Tower," two men, one 
woman. Synopsis sent on request. Sketches 
Dy me now headlining: "Stage Struck," and 
"The Doable Cross." 

FORREST W. TEHBETT8, Author and 
Producer, 667 Third Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



R 

Ramey Maud 
Raymond ft Stamford 
Remy Jack 
Remy Jack (C) 
Rehlander's Pigs 
Rlanos Four 
Rlgolds The (C) 
Ring Blanche 
Rivers ARochenter (C) 
Rlvoll A 
Rose Jack 
Rosen Jas E 
Rock William 
Ross Delia 
Rossmyn Nellie 
Rother ft Anthony 

(C) 
Russo Louise 
Russell Flo (C) 



Sander Hilda 
Savoy Lucille (P) 
Scbade Fritz (C) 
Schoen Mad 
Seaton Bill 1 c 
Seymour Harry 
Shaffner Llllyn 
Sharp B 
Sbean Lou (P) 
Shea Mary 
Sherry John 
Sinnott Francis 
Sloan W K 
Smally Ed 
8m lth George 
Smith' Margaret 
Snyder ft Vaughn 
Solomon Sol 
Southard Irving 
Stark Sisters 
8tartup Harry 
Statter Carl 
St Ella RiccArdo 
Stedman Fannie 



Stokes A B (P) 
Sutherland Jack 
Swan M 

Sweatman Wilbur 
Sweet Sixteen Quar- 
tette 

T 

Temple S W 
Terrlss Tom 
Thomas Hilda 
Thomas Cora 
Thor M 

Thorn Frankle (P) 
Trevor Cora 
Tully May 

V 

Valgene Harry 
Vannerson The (C) 
Vardon Frank 
Verdi Joseph 
Vorta Dan 
Vincent Sidney 
Vivian George 
Vnntella & Nlnn 

W 

Walck Ezra 
Walsh ft Lynch 
Watson Jesele 
Watts ft Lucas 
Weber Chaa D 
Weber Chas (C) 
Wrbb Eddy 
West Lew 
West Willie (C) 
Whitehead Ralph 
Whiteside Pearl 
Wllllsch Theo 
Wilson Duke (C) 
Wlstor & Bently 
Wolseley R B 
Woodbury M 
World ft Kingston 
Worth Louis 
Wychoff Fred 



GOOD ACTS ALWAYS WANTED. 

PHIL HUNT 

7ht Floor, Cohan Theatre (Fitzgerald) Bldg. 

N. T. REPRESENTATIVE 

Howard Athenaeum Boston 

Grand Opera House Boston 

Bowdoln Square Theatre Boston 

Booking, 4K Eastern Vaudeville Theatres. 

NEW THEATRE 

BALTIMORE^ MD. 

Acts desiring to BREAK THEIR JUMPS 
COMING EAST OR GOING WEST 

Send In yonr Open Time. NO SUNDAY 

Show. Mention Lowest Salary. Include 

Program. 

GEORGE SCHNEIDER. Manager. 

New York Office;— *07 Gaiety Theatre Bldg. 

JOHN QUIGLEY 

New England ▼andevllle Circuit, 
American repr e s en tative for W. SCOTT 
ADACKER, of London and the 

New England Vaudeville Circuit 

booking the best act at ail tlanea In the 
beet theatres of New England, Canada 
and New York. Main offices M Beyloton St., 
Boston, Maes.; Gaiety Theatre BeUdlng, Now 
York City. 

NOVELTY ACTS: SINGLES— TEAMS. 

Write or wire 

J. H. ALOZ 

Canadian Theatres Booking Agency, 

Orphemn Theatre Bldg., 

MONTREAL, P. Q. 



ARTISTS' NOTICE 

Brennan-Fuller 

Vaudeville Circuit 

(AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND) 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS WRITE 

REFINEMENT ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL 

COARSE OR SLOVENLY ACTS 

SAVE POSTAGE 

All Communications to BEN. J. FULLER 
Managing Director, Sydney, N. S. W. 

THEATRES 

SYDNEY, Amphitheatre. 
SYDNEY, Balmain. 
MELBOURNE, National. 
MELBOURNE, Gaiety. 
ADELAIDE, King's. 
BRISBANE. Theatre Royal. 
AUCKLAND (N. Z.), Opera House. 
WELLINGTON, Theatre Royal. 
CHRISTCHURCH, Opera House. 
DINEDIN. King's Theatre. 

SILENCE A TOLITE NEGATIVE. 



ACTS WANTED 

Vaudeville acts laying off In New York can 
secure Immediate time by calling on me. No 
act too large to handle. 

SAM D. HYAMS 

Phone S8M Bryant Room §04 

Colombia Theatre Building, New York 



GRIFFIN CIRCUIT 

The Hide away big time circuit. No acts too big. Exclusive agents. Write or wire PETER 
F. GRIFFIN, Booking Agent, Griffin Vaudeville Circuit. Variety Bldg., Toronto, Can. 
Can open acts at Toronto, Sarnia, Ottawa, Sault Ste. Marie or Niagara Falls. 

BERT LEVEY 









II 



CIRCU VAUDEVILLE 



Plenty of Time for Recognised A cts That 
cnte Direct to EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 
San Francisco. Calif. 



Contracts. Acts desiring time 
Theatre Bldg., O'Farrell St., 



mmnnl- 
Powell, 



J. C. MATTHEWS 

General Booking 
Representative, 
85 So. Dearborn St.. 
Chicago. 
LOUIS PINCU8 
New York Repre- 
sentative, Gayety 
Theatre Bldg. 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 



OF 



VAUDEVILLE THEATRES, Inc. 

ALEXANDER PANTAGES 
President and Manager 

SEATTLE 



EUROPEAN OFFICE 

Berlin. Germany. 

RICHARD PITBOT 

Representative. 

BRANCH~~OFFICBS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

DENVER, 



FREEMAN BERNSTEIN 

Manager, Promoter and Producer of Vaudeville Acts, 

4th Floor, FITZGERALD BLDG., NEW YORK. 

OPEN NIGHT AND DAY. Cable "Freeborn, New York." 

DOUTRICK'S 



Mat. I. DOUTtlCK, Prep is. Missier 



1M SOUTH U SALLE ST., CHICAOO 



WANTED 

New Acts, New Faces, Recognised Big Feature Acta Good Comedy Sketches, Novelty and 

Musical Acta, etc., for Immediate and future time. 

BOOKING First Claas Vaudeville Houses In Chicago, and II Houses In 111. Jumps from 40 

eta to $4. Also Now Houses In Ind., Iowa, Wla 

you have one or more weeks open, write, wire or phone. 



PLAYING THE 



IN VAUDEVILLB. 



SULLIVAN and CONSUME CIRCUIT 



GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICE: 
Sullivan and Consldlne Bldg*., Third and 
Madison Streets, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 
LINCOLN Gen. Mgr. 



GENERAL BOOKING OFFICE: 
1465 BROADWAY— HEIDELBERG BLDG. 
NEW YORK CITY 



CHRIS O. BROWN. 



BRANCH BOOKING OFFICES: PAUL GOUDRON, 6 North Clark St., cor. Madison, Chi- 
cago, III.; MAURICE J. BURNS. Id and Madison 8ts.. Seattle, Wash.; W. P. REESE, tit 
Market St., San Francisco, Cal.; B. OBERMATER, It Greene St., London, Eng. 

ARTHUR J..H0RWITZ 

ACTS WANTING EASTERN BOOKINGS 



CALL WIRE 

MBCKEtSKKEI THEATtE BUILDING. 1412 



WRITE 

. NEW YOIK, SUITE 821-131 5217-1 RnfELEY 



CHURCH'S BOOKING OFFICE. Inc. 

Boating 

THIRTY (80) FIRST CLASS THEATRES In New England and New York. 

White Bat Contracts No Black List 

48 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON. 



Haa y> y of all performers going to Europe make their steamship arrangements through 
QkCv m«v The following have: Camllle Oner, Our Boy. in Blue. Otto Bros.. Arthur 
OeJ yfl Prince, Plroscoffls, Patty Frank Troupe, Pandur Bros., Pennant Bros., Paulton 
v " / ^ at Dooley, Phil 6 Nettle Peters, Plchlannl Troupe, Patty Bros., Pert Inn, Peres 
Troupe, Ploetc Larella Sisters. 

PAUL TAU8IO, 104 B. 14th St.. New York City. 
German Savings Bank Bldg. Telephone Stuyveaant I09t. 



OHIO'S LEGITIMATE VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 



Acts Jumping East or West 
Write in Advance 



THE R. J. MORRIS AGENCY 

4SS Cotumbla Building, Cleveland, OMe 



C H. MILES, 



I. FLUEQELMAN, 



Y, 



BEMJ. S. MOSS, Tree 



CONSOLIDATED DOOKING OFFICES, fe-, 

Fitzgerald Building, BROADWAY AT 43rd STREET. NEW YORK CITY TtitfMMs.sisi f 452 S4S3 3213 Bryan 

CHICAGO OFFICESi IS M. CLARK ST. Thane 1S11 Randolph BOSTON OFFICESi 210 TREMONT ST. Phone. 2070 Oxford 
Flaying the beat In vaudeville, beat houeee, beat treatment, beat engagements. 



BOOKING 



MILES CIRCUIT SHEEDY CIRCUIT 

CUNNINOHAM-FLUEGELMAN CIRCUIT 

MOSS A BRILL CIRCUIT 

THEATRE BOOKING CORPORATION 

ARTISTS-SEND IN OPEN TIME 

4* CONSECUTIVE WEEKS 



When antwering adverthements kindly mention VARIETY. 



42 



VARIETY 



▼ENTKILOqrjIST WTTM A 
PRODCCTIOM 



ED. F. 



REYNARD 



Presents Scth Dowberry und Jawo Jiwnton 1b 

"A MORNING IN HICKSYILLB." 
Direction. GENE HUGHES. 

Gene Hughes 

PUTNAM BUILDING, 14fS BBOADWAY, 
NEW YOBK. 



WIGGIN'S FARM 

APPLY TO THE CHAD WICK TB1Q. 

STUART BARNES 

JAMES B. PLUNK ETT, Manager. 



MAIIOUCRITE 




Direction, Max Hart, 



Bid*., N. T. C. 



3 MUSKETEERS 3 



CHARLES AHEARN 




"THE SPEED KING." 

PAT CASEY, Agent. 

B-A-N-J-O-P-H-l-E-N-DS 



BOOKED SOLID 






(Dunham) (Edwards) (Farrell) 

Johnny Neff said "next season I am coins' 
oat off show business." We asked what do 
700 Intend doing- Johnny f and he answered 
"I am going to take oat a girl act." 
A back dancer Is a noble anlmaL 



John T. Murray 

I apologise to the public for my Inabil- 
ity to entertain them this week. An un- 
fortunate cold preventing my public ap- 
pearance. N. B. Cheer up I'll be with 
you soon again. 



BILLY DAMA 

HALLIGAN "» SYKES 

Nest Week (Oct. 7), Orpheum. Harrlsburg. 
Direction, W. 8. Hennessy. 



We left Cairo at 2 
ft.. M. and sunrise 
found us on top of 
the Pyramid of 
Cheops the largest of 
the bunch. What a 
glorious .sight. Jt 
takes 21 minutes to 
climb It with the as- 
sistance of three 
guides. If your foot 
slips, goodnight. 

Then to the Temple 
of the Sun, whispered 
a wish In the Sphinx's ear, mil off a camel 
(laughln'), tipped a new guide every eight 
minutes, got swindled for some Egyptian 
money, seen a "What What" 3.716 years old. 
think It belonged to Rammlses II, fought IS 
Egyptians and Arabs (with words only), then 
back to Cairo the wonderful city that you 
have all read about. 

CaughttheboatatPort8aidly yours, 

VARDON, PERRY A WILBER 




DALLAS ROMANS 

"THAT TEXAS GIBL" 

Touring W. V. M. A. Time. 

Direction. MYSELF. 



JUOOLBB 
BOOKED SOLID 
United 



Marcus - Gartelle 

fas their sketch 

"Skatorial Rollorism" 

JAJtftB PLUNK ETT, Mgr, 




GAVIN *so PLATT 
th. PEACHES 



BOOKED ON V. B. D. 
1BJ1-M FltSSW 7 Ntwffcsrs* its., 



M« B> oj. 



BERT MELROSE 

Featuring the "MELROSE FALL" 



a 



THE 



LEAP YEAR 
GIRLS" 

A comedy satire. Kent the Sunday 
audience at the Empress In tears all the 
while. Laughter being so close to weep- 
ing anyhow. From a little Incipient rip- 
ple to a great, sweeping gale of "hah-ha 
has," Is the cycle.— San Francisco "News." 

Address, Fred'k Wallace, per route. 



BBAL MONEY HAS THE REAL RING. 

JOHNNIE REILLY 

Champion 3 ball comedian of the world. 
This Week (Sept. SO), National, Montreal. 



Willa Holt Wakefield 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



wentatlTe: 
JEN1B JACOBS. 



Lola Merrill and Frank Otto 

Next Week (Oct. 6), Orpheum, 

MAX HAHT. 



I II r«u>f l< 



I SHOULD WORRY 

HONG FONG 

Character Singer and Dance 



BARRYmWOLFORD 

"AT THE SONG BOOTH." 

Booked Solid on Orpheum and United dreahh 

JA«. E. I'LUNKETT, Smart Mgr. 
Perm. Add., Casino and Roosevelt Aves., 

Freeport, L. I. 
Next Week (Oct. 7), Orpheum, Memphis . 

ALFREDO 

BOOKED SOLID. 

Next Week (Oct. 7). Allentown and Beading. 

Williard Simms 

Booked Solid 
Direction. LOUIS WESLEY 

Rube Dickinson 

Next Week (Oct. 6), Maryland, Baltimore. 




Williams 



and 



Sterling 

Next Week (Oct, I), 
Queen, Galveston. 



MYRTLE 



IRENE 



VICTORINE and ZOLAR 

Playtag United Time. 
Direction, JKNIE JACOBS. 

MAX OBACB 

Ritter-Foster 

TRIO 

with The Gey Widows.** 
Address earn VARIETY, Now York. 



AND 









A LAUGH A SECOND 



DR. CARL 



HERMAN 






W. V. M. A. 
PAT CABBY 



WILFRED CLARKE 




«L 



TANEAN and CLAXTON 



ALWAYS WORKING 



HOME AODBBSS, 



PACIPIO S 



f BROOKLYN 




When anmoering advvrtisemi'.iite K< "•'' »>" ntlon VARIETY. 



VARIETY 


















THE SUNDAY CHRONICLE 



That Mia* Charlotte Parry'* "protean act" 
waa a popular aucceaa at the Hippodrome OB 
Monday there can be no doubt The greatest 
•f her foreign predeceaaora waa making for 
hie buttona, and eaalng hie palpable wigs ere 
he waa half-way through a speech. But 
when a protean act la bo good aa Miss Parry's, 
It alwaya leavee me with one desire— to see 
the artists attack one part, to paint In all ite 
light and shade, to reveal the soul of the 
creature but dimly portrayed as In Miss 
Parry** act at the Hippodrome. I left the thea- 
tre with one face and one voice haunting ms. 
A fig for ths veraatllity, the wonderful ver- 
aatiilty, of the half dosen witnesses — black 
and wblts, English and foreign. There was 
the heart-rending picture of that Italian 
woman wronged wife and tortured mother, 
telling how she was urged to murder by a 
passionate Impulse. It was fine. I love act- 
ing so much that I want to see Miss Parry 
play a real part. In a real drama. And I 
don't want the llluaion of such a performance 
to be Imperilled, even by a curtain call. 









London 

THE NEWS OF 

THE WORLD 












Of the recent batch of American artists 
who have Invaded these shores, Charlotte 
Parry does not yield the palm to any of them 
in histrionic ability. Her turn at the Hippo- 
drome Is one of the moat original perform- 
ances on the boards, so far aa the styls of 
presentation la concerned. The whole turn 
had about It a touch of genius. 






»-> 












\jLf #W C9 |^J I |\l ^^ I 1 nave learned that my late partner GEORGE W. JONES has either sold or 
^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ■ ^B ■ ■ ^B ^^ ■ presented to Jake Sternad and possibly others my routine of talk known as 
"The Shoemaker's Last." This material is fully copyrighted and any attempt at infringement will be fully and imme- 
diately prosecuted. Mr. Sternad has kindly promised not to produce this routine which will shortly be presented by 



• 






assistedlby MARIE WAYNE and EMMETT BRISCOE 



in a new offering entitled 



0\sV 



COMING EAST SHORTLY 



Direction M. S. BENTHAM 



•sfoerNssmsfil* Mfitfly mmitton VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



, 



■— 



VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS 






. 



ER MONTHS OF" F>RE 



ION 







• • 



FILM SERVICE 












NONAS READY 



• 






• 









- 

- 









IVIIN/I 



. . 















AMERICAN ACTED DRAMAS 

AND COMEDIES 


















. 



SCIENTIFIC 



I 



SOENIO 



EDUCATION 



I 



EACH ONE A HEADLINER 



KINEMACOLOR COMPANY OF AMERICA 



WRITE OR WIRE FOR EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS 
FOR YOUR TOWN 



1600 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Whtn antwring mi/pwrtiu^mmtU Mull? mtmHom TAMIMTY. 



** 



TEN CENTS 




VOL. XXVIII. No. 6. 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1912. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



•i^^i 




VARIETY 



For Theatrical People Who Want to Make Some Money 



And Get Ahead hi the World 



We have been In the real estate business in New York City during the past ten yean, and in that time have leaned thousands of deeds, involving millions of dollars, la payment 
for lots located in New York City and Its suburbs. 

We wish it understood that every word contained In the advertisement below Is the plain, straight troth, free from all exaggeration, and is under, rather than overestimated 
as to the facta, 



Lots in 



City are as good as Government Bonds 



And You Can Buy Them on a Payment of $5 Monthly 

When you boy New York City lota, yon have security as goad aa Government Bonds, bat vastly more profitable. The Bonds do not increase la 
value, but New York City lota do, and have for 50 yean paet, and will for 50 years to coma and longer. This la a fact that yon can depend upon. 

AN OPENING SALE OF A LIMITED NUMBER OF SPLENDIDLY LOCATED 

NEW YORK CITY LOTS 

That Are To-day 

One of the Best Investments In America 



More money will be made In the next few years by buying low priced New York City 
lota, that have Just been Improved and pat on the market, than In any other investment 
la the world. A few lata that you can buy to-day aa low aa S490 to $750 each, wo 
believe will make you larger profits la the next few years than any other similar invest- 



ment in the United States. You < 
low aa 95 per month. These lots 
City. 



buy these lots on the monthly payment plan at aa 
located la one of the prettiest spots la Now York 



Adjacent to the New York City Harbor Improvements at Jamaica Bay 

On which over $100,000,000 la being spent by the City, State and Government; the work la now well under way. 



JUDGING FROM THE PAST, THESE LOTS IN A FEW YEARS, WILL BE WORTH FIVE TIMES WHAT YOU FAY FOR THEM TO-DAY. 

Aa well aa being one of the moat desirable Residential Sections in the City, the property affords 

BOATING, BATHING AND SPLENDID FISHING 






THERE ARE ONLY 



450 LOTS TO BE SOLD 

PRICK 

$490 to $750 EACH on easy terms 

$10 down aa a first payment on each lot, and $5.00 Monthly Payment each month 

thereafter 

NO INTEREST CHARGES, ON DEFERRED PAYMENTS 

TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT ALLOWED FOR CASH, IF FULL PAYMENT IS MADE 

WITHIN 00 DAYS 

ALL CORNER LOTS $50 EXTRA. NO CORNER LOT WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT 

ADJOINING LOT 



LOCATION 

These lota are located on Park Boulevard, Roeedale Avenue, Lincoln Avenne, 
President Avenne, Rose Place, Dale Place, Union Avenne, Oxford Place, Sterling 
Street, Klnaey Avenue and Park Avenne, Fourth Ward, Borough of Queens, New 
York City. Being all regular city lots, with sidewalk, curbs, macadamised streets, 
water mains, electricity, etc. All of these improvements furnished free with each lot. 

THE TITLES TO THESE LOTS ARE 

GUARANTEED AND INSURED 

TO THE BUYER, BY THE 

Lawyers 1 Title Guarantee and * Trust Company 

OF NEW YORK * 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $9,500,000 

Title Insurance Policy delivered free with each deed. 



Trolley and Rapid Transit Service Runs Directly Through Property to All Parts of Broadway 

You can have a good Idea of the future value of this property when wo tell yoa that yon can go from the above streets to any of the large department stores on Broadway or 
to the Wall Street district in 27 minutes by the watch, or by subway from any downtown station in S3 minute*. THIS IS PROPERTY YOU CAN BUY. AND KNOW THAT YOU 
ABB PUTTING YOUR MONEY INTO A LEGITIMATE INVESTMENT, AND ONE THAT WILL TURN YOU IN A PROFIT. 



I 



RIC 



Theae lots are so situated that they are the moat desirable in the City for people In the profession. .The Penn Station at 38d street and 7th avenne Is close to all the theatres, 
and yon can leave the theatre after the performance, and be home In 80 to 85 minutes. Yon have at the same time all the benefits of living- in individual homes, with gardens 
and all the comforts of good air, sunshine, and privacy In yonr home life, electric cars all day and night, Jnst the same as the subway. 



A SPECIAL SET OF CARS LEAVE EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

AT TWO O'CLOCK TO SHOW PEOPLE THESE LOTS. 

Come to the train gate, Penn.-Long Island station, 33d St. and 7th Ave., and meet our agent with white ribbon on coat, marked "4th Ward, Borough of Queens." or to tb-s 
Flatbnsh Ave. station. In Brooklyn, a few minutes before above time and he will show you these lota. 



INFORMATION COUPON. 
NEW YORK SUBURBAN LAND CO. 

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When answering adverti$ement» kindly mention VARIETY. 




Vol. XXVIII. No. 6. 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1912. 



PRICE 10 CENTS. 






ATTORNEY GENERAL ASKED 

TO DI SSOLVE THE U. B. 0. 

Jack Levy Serves Complaint Upon Vaudeville Collection 

Agency. Petitions for Hearing to Abolish That 

Agency, Also United Booking Offices. 



Attorney August Dreyer, counsel for 
Jack Levy has applied to the attorney 
general of New York State to set a 
date for a hearing of argument why 
the United Booking Offices and the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency should 
not be ordered' dissolved under the 
General Business Law. 

This action is in addition to the 
suit brought by Mr. Levy against the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency for an 
accounting of the five per cent, of acts' 
salaries due him as manager, and which 
he alleges was collected under an il- 
legal contract. 

Mr. Levy's complaint in the latter 
suit, which will be tried in the Supreme 
Court, was served on the defendant 
this week. In it the agent recites 
that he was forced into making a con- 
tract with the Collection Agency to 
collect his five per cent, of which the 
Agency retained one-half. He declares 
that he entered into this agreement 
only after he had been informed by 
John Murdock and Phil Nash that he 
could not do business in the U. B. O. 
unless he did make such a contract. 

These allegations will be presented 
to the attorney general as the basis 
of the charge that the Collection 
Agency is a creature of the U. B. O., 
carries on no useful business and is 
a subterfuge by which the United col- 
lects an illegal booking commission 
from performers, in violation of the 
Employment Agency Law. 

The complaint in the suit for an 
accounting sets forth: 

"The above named plaintiff (Jack L#evy) 
by August Dreyer. his attorney, complaining 
of and against the above named defendant 
(Vaudeville Collection Agency) alleges: 

"1. That at all the times hereinafter men- 
tioned, the above named defendant wsb and 
"till Is a corporation under the laws of 
New York. 

"-' That prior to July. 10lo, this plaintiff 
w »s an employment agent, engaged in se- 
curing engagements for vaudeville perform- 
ers and was conducting a large and lucrative 
business. 

"3. That on July 3, 1!>10, plaintiff had been 
Going an extensive business as a vaude- 



ville agent with the United Booking Offices, 
a foreign corporation doing business In the 
State of New York, in the procurement 
through it of engagements for vaudeville per- 
formers. 

"4. That about July 5. 1010, plaintiff was 
informed that In order to do any business 
whatever with the United Booking Offices he 
would be obliged to go downstairs and enter 
into an agreement with this defendant, the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency, before he could 
enter its floor or do business with said United 
Booking Offices and plaintiff was also in- 
formed that he had better see the counsel for 
the United Booking Offices, who was presi- 
dent of the Vaudeville Collection Agency, 
which plaintiff at once proceeded to do. 

"5. That plaintiff called upon the counsel 
for said United Booking Offices, and was in- 
formed by him that in order to do any 
business whatsoever, he would be obliged to 
enter into a contract with said Vaudeville 
Collection Agency to pay fifty per cent, of 
plaintiff's salary on all contracts entered into 
by him with vaudeville actors. 

"6. That plaintiff, while under duress, • • • 
did enter into an agreement with the Vaude- 
ville Collection Agency, wherein the plaintiff 
agreed to pay and allow to defendant fifty per 
cent, of his salary for the collection thereof ; 
that the said agreement was to run for 
five years, and the same makes said col- 
lection agency, its successors and assigns, 
lawful agent to collect all said moneys ; and 
it is therein stipulated and agreed that said 
plaintiff will not appoint any other person 
to make such collection during the term 
of the agreement, nor to collect the same 
nor any part of said salary direct. 

"7 That the United Booking Offices con- 
trol a majority of the first-class theatres 
throughout the east as far as and including 
Chiraco. and has large rooms to enter which 
special permission must be given and such 
permission to managers is necessary In order 
to do business with said Booking Offices; that 
plaintiff was denied entrance to said rooms 
until he had entered Into the said agreement 
with this defendant to pay It fifty per cent, 
of his salary. • • • 

"«. That John Murdock and Phil. Nash, 
who are connected with said booking office* 
notified plaintiff that he could not do busi- 
ness with said United Booking Offices or 
enter its rooms where Its business was con- 
ducted any longer and when this fact be- 
carae known to the vaudeville actors and 
actresses they refused to do business with 
plaintiff, that. Inasmuch as he had been ousted, 
they could see no reason for longer requiring 
his services. 

0. That this defendant, the Vaudeville Col- 
lection Agency, had and still has offices in 
the same building where the United Booking 
Offices conducts Its business and that the 
president of this defendant was and still la 

the counsel for the United Booking Offices. 

• • • 

"10. That a short time prior to the com- 
mencement of this action this defendant was 
Informed and discovered for the first time 
that a contract of this nature was prohibited 
under the laws of this State. 1. e.. Chapter 
700, of the Laws of 1010. amending article 
eleven of the General Business Law. 
"Wherefore. Plaintiff prays judgment: 
"A. That said agreement dated July 5, 1010, 
allowing defendant to collect his salary as 

(Continued on page 6). 



ALFRED BUTT COMING OVER. 

Alfred Butt, managing, director of 
the Palace Music Hall and Victoria 
Palace and head of the Variety Thea- 
tres Controlling Co., of London, will 
arrive in New York next week. 

While here Mclntyre and Heath 
will present all of their sketches at the 
Fifth Avenue during the week for Mr. 
Butt's inspection with a view to mak- 
ing a proper selection for the black- 
faced team's appearance in London 
under the management of the English 
vaudeville impressario. 

The idea of repertoire in vaudeville 
is, incidentally, an innovation. 



KEITH NOT HEAVILY LADENED. 

B. F. Keith is nof heavily ladenei 
with features for his vaudeville houses, 
according to the space utilized in the 
programs of the local Keith theatre to 
apprise the public of coming attrac- 
tions. 

But three headline turns are featured 
in the advance press work. One of 
these, Ada Reeve, starts an American 
tour Monday at the Colonial. Another 
is Cecilia Loftus, due to open in the 
same house Oct. 21. Nothing is men- 
tioned of any top line that may drop 
in before the contracted appearance of 
Wilkie Bard, some time in December. 



BUSIEST BUILDING MANAGER. 

William Fox has in course of con- 
struction or renovation more theatres 
than any individual manager in the 
United States at the present time. 
There are six all told — the new Riv- 
erside (Broadway and 97th street); 
Tremont; Hippodrome (165th street 
and Broadway); new house in Water- 
bury, Conn., seating 2,400; new house 
in Holyoke, Mass., and the Nelson, 
Springfield, Mass. (old house being 
thoroughly overhauled). 



HAS FINE COMPLAINT. 

Frank Bohm leaves for Lakewood 
Saturday for a rest. He is suffering 
from nervous prosperity. 



PALACE DOING WELL. 

The Palace Music Hall business 
jumped up with a buum this week, be- 
fore one of the best vaudeville shows 
ever in Chicago. 



ISMAN SUES HITCHCOCK. 

A suit to recover $7,500 has beeen 
filed in the Supreme Court, New York, 
by Felix Isman. It is against Ray- 
mond Hitchcock, and alleges the 
amount was loaned in cas\ to Hitch- 
cock during his legal difficulties of 
some years ago. 

For defense Hitchcock sets up pay- 
ment, also that he has passed through 
bankruptcy, which left Mr. Isman 
without a valid claim against him. 

August Dreyer is the attorney for 
Isman. 



LOBW'S BIG DEAL. 

It was reported during the early 
part of the week that Marcus Loew 
was in negotiation for a big piece of 
real estate, that would surprise the 
show people along Broadway if finally 
concluded. 



TULLY MARSHALL BUYS TALKER. 

Boston, Oct. 9. 
Tully Marshall, starring in "The 
Talker," at the Hollis, yesterday pur- 
chased the Henry B. Harris Estate in- 
terest in the piece and will continue 
the play with the present company in- 
tact. 

Beginning next Monday "The Talk- 
er" will be booked by the Shuberts 
with Rochester and Toledo three nights 
each and the Garrick, Chicago, to fol- 
low for two weeks, or longer if busi- 
ness warrants. The company manager, 
Samuel Wallach, a brother-in-law of 
the late Henry B. Harris, and the ad- 
vance man, are to sever their connec- 
tion with the enterprise and return to 
the Harris fold. 

Business for "The Talker" has been 
worse than bad this week. 

It is understood to be Mrs. Harris' 
intention to cut away from all dead 
wood in the form of productions that 
do not bear fruit. 



ROOSEVELT STRAW-VOTE FAV. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
Mart H. Singer reports that his 
three shows, one touring California, 
one the middle west and the other 
Kansas and Missouri, are taking straw 
votes in their audiences, with exciting 
results. Mr. Singer reports that up 
to date Roosevelt has had the lead in 
nearly every contest. 



VARIETY 



PALACE, LONDON, PAYS BONUS 
TO EXTEND OABY D ESLYS' TIME 

Alfred Butt Settles with Shuberts for $6,000 and Gives 

Gaby $2,500 Weekly on Extension. Largest Salary 

Paid by Palace, Excepting $5,000 a Week 

to Sir Herbert Beerbohm-Tree. 



RICKARDS SALE CONFIRMED. 

London, Oct. 9. 

Papers have arrived rom Australia 
confirming the deal by which Hugh 
Mackintosh was to take over the Rick- 
ards Circuit Sept. 14. 

Among the bookings are Harry Lau 
der and Cissie Loftus. 



London, Oct. 9. 

The engagement of Gaby Deslys at 
the Palace has been extended for three 
weeks. Her first contract expired 
Oct. 5. 

Arrangement for the extension was 
agreed upon between Alfred Butt and 
the Shuberts in New York. The 
American managers receive $6,000 as 
a bonus, the Shuberts holding Gaby 
under agreement to open in "Vera 
Violetta" some time this month. 

During the extended stay the Pal- 
ace will pay Gaby $2,500 weekly. The 
salary during the first term was $2,000. 
For each of the three weeks the Gaby 
Deslys act will cost Mr. Butt $4,500. 
This is $500 less than the highest price 
the Palace has ever paid for a turn, 
Sir Herbert Beerbohm-Trce receiving 
$5,000 a week. 

The prolongation of Gaby Deslys at 
the Palace, London, will cause a post- 
ponement of the reopening of "Vera 
Violetta" until after election. Mile. 
Deslys will probably sail from the 
other side Oct. 26, closing at the Pal- 
ace Friday night of that week. 



ZOO THEATRE PERMITTED. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 

The police has given permission for 
the Variety theatre at the Zoo to open. 
Vaudeville and a short operetta will 
be the entertainment. 

Fritzi Massary, one of the highest 
salaried soubrets on the Continent, has 
been engaged for the company. Max 
Pallenberg, who appeared in "The 
Miracle/' has also been engaged. 



DARING SUBJECT SUCCESSFUL. 

London, Oct. 9. 

"The Open Door," a melodrama, 
produced at the Lyceum, has for its 
chief role a priest. 

The subject is very daring, and is 
successful. 



LYX HARDING'S SUCCESSOR. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Lyn Harding sailed last Saturday for 
America to report for rehearsal for 
David Belasco's next production, 
"Years of Discretion." His role in 
"Drake" is now being played by Fred- 
crick Ross. 



SPRING FESTIVALS IN BERLIN. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 

Special festivals arc being planned 
for the spring of 1913. to eclrbrate tin 
Kaiser's government jubilee. 

All the theatres are planning special 
shows for this occasion. 



APPEAL FOR OPERA HOUSE. 

London, Oct. 9. 
An appeal has been signed by the 
greatest English musical leaders to buy 
the London Opera House from Oscar 
Haiurnerstein and make it a permanent 
public institution, 



The appeal is signed by Sir Freder- 
ick Bridge, Sir Frederick Cowen, Sir 
Charles Villiers Stanford, Sir Walter 
Parratt, Edward German, Landon 
Ronald, Ben Davies, and Sir Hubert 
Hastings Parry. 



BERLIN HOUSE FOR LEHAR. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 
The Apollo theatre has been secured 
by Karzarg & Waller, the publishers. 
They will produce operettas by Franz 
Lehar in it. 



FLICKERGRAPH IN COL. 

London, Oct. 9. 
The Flickergraph goes to the Coli 
seum Oct. 23. 



FARADAY COMING OVER. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Michael Faraday is going to the 
United States. He has arranged for a 
production there of "Amasis," an 
Egyptian comic opera, which was a 
big success in London some years ago. 



SISTER RUTH AND SKETCH. 

London, Oct. 9. 
A booking is reported of Sister Ruth 
from "The Abode of Love," in a 
sketch. 



LA MILO-CRUICKSHANK MAKE UP 

London, Oct. 9. 
La Milo and Cruikshank have re- 
joined, having settled all differences. 



REVIVED "BEAUTY" PANTO. 

London, Oct. 9. 
This year's Drury Lane pantomime 
will be a revival of "The Sleeping 
Beauty." The original intention of 
taking a new subject has been aban- 
doned. 



SKETCH WITH "SURPRISE." 

London, Oct. 9. 
"Don't You Believe It," presented 
at the Palladium, is a western lynch- 
ing sketch with a "surprise" finish. At 
the most tense moment it is stopped 
by the moving picture operator, who 
orders it played over, as he didn't 
succeed in taking the picture properly. 



MELBA DRAWS. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Mme. Melba reappeared at Albert 
Hall Saturday to enormous business. 



HIP REVUE PRINCIPALS. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Bert Coote, Shirley Kellogg, Cyril 
Clensy, Alec Roper and a chorus of 
thirty-six selected girls will be in the 
new Hippodrome operetta, "The Blue 
House." The scene is laid in a fash- 
ionable laundry. 




STRONGER THEATRE WALL. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 

Since the burning of the Theatre 
des Westens the authorities have dis- 
covered that the gas pressure in a 
big stage is so great it will burst any 
wall. 

A new theatre in course of construc- 
tion has been compelled to build a 
double iron wall of steel filled with 
six inches of concrete around its stage 
house, to prevent a recurrence. 



SUCCEEDING "REBECCA." 

London, Oct. 9. 
* Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" ends 
its run at the Globe two weeks hence 
and will be succeeded by "Officer 
666," with "Get-Rich-Quick Walling- 
ford" also in sight in the event "Offi- 
cer 666" does not prove successful. 



SPECTACLE WELL RECEIVED. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 
The Circus Schumann spectacle, 
"The Invisible Man," was very well re- 
ceived on its premiere. It has beauti- 
ful scenes and good staging. 



ABANDONING VAUDEVILLE. 

Berlin, Oct. 9. 

It is definitely decided that the Pas- 
sage theatre will discontinue its vau- 
deville policy and be used as a moving 
picture house. 

The Apollo theatre is also abandon- 
ing vaudeville, beginning in the spring 
of 1913, when operettas will be the at- 
tractions. 



"TWELFTH NIGHT" NEXT. 

London, Oct. 9. 
"Twelfth Night" will follow "A Win- 
ter's Tale" at the Savoy; for which 
another impressionistic effort is prom- 
ised. 



BERNHARDT AS ELIZABETH. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Mme. Sarah Bernhardt as Elizabeth, 
at the Coliseum, great. 



LAUDER IN SCOTCH PLAY. 

London, Oct. 9. 

Harry Lauder will appear for one 
performance at a charity matinee of 
"A Scrape o' the Pen," to be given at 
the Comedy. 

He will play the role of Geordie 
Pow for this occasion. The perform- 
ance takes place Oct. 23. 



STORM A NT BOOKED. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Leo Stormant. who has been fea- 
tured in a scenic production in the 
Islands, has been engaged for a short 
tour in the States. He is scheduled 
to appear at the Colonial. New York, 
during the autumn in "The Exposure." 

It was stated in New York that 
Stormant would play ten weeks over 
here. M. S. Bentham handled the 
transaction. 



EMPIRE REVUE AT APOLLO. 

London, Oct. 9. 
The Empire Revue goes into the 
Apollo theatre around Christmas time. 
"'Tl»' ' '.i- \\ !-iow" comes off imme- 
diate I \ 



MR. FREDERICK IRELAND Catherine \K J'ont, from London, is 

Ami his CASINO DANCING GIRLS, assisted by NEMO CATTO and P. W. MILES, In a con«:'icimg I Tea^'inc vaudeville with a 

musical comnly, "HIGH LIGHTS OF PEAR OLh UKOADWAY." I>|r«ctio n of BEEHLER „• , . 8 vauucvuic wnn « 

PROS. 1 lerre Lou .ketch. 



VARIETY 



5 



"BLANKET" CONTRACT TIES 

UP WE STERN A SS'N M'QR'S. 

W. V, M. A. Vaudeville Men Trying to Find Way Out. 

Give Up Northwestern Bookings. Kerry 

Meagher's New Position. 



Chicago, Oct. 9. 

The long-expected mix-up in West- 
ern Vaudeville Managers' Association 
bookings resulting from the confusion 
caused by the internal strife in that 
agency through the summer months 
has finally arrived. The blanket con- 
tracts that were liberally handed out 
by both the "Association" proper and 
those managers that made up the Con- 
solidated Vaudeville Managers' Cor- 
poration are beginning to entwine 
themselves around a badly muddled 
condition. 

Cancellations are happening in all 
sections of the middle west. Since 
each contract of the "blanket" specie 
carries a liquidated damage clause 
that calls for the forfeiture of an 
amount equal to one week's salary 
of the act engaged, by the party re- 
sponsible for the cancellation, it looks 
as though the next move will be 
toward the courts. This the "Asso- 
ciation" officials deny however, claim- 
ing they intend to live up to every 
"blanket" now in force. 

When peace was finally restored in 
the summer, a comparison of bookings 
showed the outside agents — who had 
wisely prepared for an open door dur- 
ing the scrap — had the pick of avail- 
able attractions. 

When routing time approached, the 
managers assembled and did some hur- 
ried thinking. The blanket contracts 
were carefully scanned and quite as 
carefully laid aside, and the ten per 
centers commenced to do some early 
hustling. Last week Managing Direc- 
tor Kohl called the managers and 
agents together and suggested that the 
blanket contracts be given a little 
more attention. Everyone present 
agreed to live up to the existing con- 
tracts, and it is expected that trouble 
will be partially averted in this way. 
Several of the acts contracted for have 
executed some graceful "flopping," par- 
ticularly those that came from the 
east. It is expected the "Association" 
heads will terminate those agreements 
by the payment of the liquidated dam- 
age amount. 

The ten per cent, agents were no- 
tified last week that hereafter they 
must devote their entire attention to 
the "Association" and not supply op- 
position agencies under any circum- 
stances. It is doubtful if this rule can 
be strictly lived up to, since the agents 
claim that opposition booking is an 
absolute necessity for a complete 
route, especially as the Association" 
routing is being carried on under diffi- 
culties. 

Just at present the middle west is 
wondering what disposition will be 
made of the blanket contracts. C. E. 
Kohl stated to a Variktv representa- 
tive that every one will be fully played 
out. However, the managers are still 
calling on the ten per centers for as- 
sistance. 
After a conference between Martin 



Beck and Charles E. Kohl today, 
Kerry Meagher was appointed execu- 
tive booking manager of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, 
having final and full charge of every- 
thing on the Association floor. He 
will be subject to any immediate or- 
ders from Managing Director Kohl. 

Meagher thoroughly understands the 
business routine of the Agency and has 
personal knowledge of every condition 
wherein it is affected. His appoint- 
ment relieves Mr. Kohl of considera- 
ble detail work. 

By entrusting Meagher with this 
power creates a new office in the As- 
sociation. He has been with the W. 
V. M. A. for seven years. 

San Francisco, Oct. 9. 

The Western Vaudeville Managers' 
Association has abandoned its string 
of booking connections in the north- 
west, including seven and a half weeks 
from Sheridan, Wyo., to Pendleton, 
Ore. 

The time was booked by Fisher un- 
til the W. V. M. A. took them over. It 
is reported that the houses will return 
to Fisher. It has been asserted here 
that the local managers are turning 
down Association contracts. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

The Association has decided to give 
up the northwestern time recently ac- 
quired, according to authorities in that 
establishment, because of difficulty in 
getting acts to play that far out. The 
Association officials declare they pro- 
pose to operate a new chain through 
Minnesota to replace the territory 
from which they now retire. 

A source of dissatisfaction is said to 
have been the action of Flint George, 
the Association's traveling man, who 
asserted that he could deliver Or- 
pheum Circuit acts. This statement 
was denied by Morris Meyerfeld and 
the northwest managers felt that they 
had been made victims of misrepre- 
sentations. 

The opinion is expressed here that 
no one here can successfully compete 
with Levey or Fisher. They are be- 
lieved to be too thoroughly established 
in their territory. 



DE ANGEL18 ON ORPHEUM. 

New Orleans, Oct. 9. 
Jefferson De Angelis opens at the 
Orpheum theatre Monday. It will be 
his first vaudeville engagement in an 
Orpheum Circuit house. 



EDUCATED HORSE DEAD. 

Shelbyville, Ind., Oct. 9. 
"Beautiful Jim Key," the famous edu- 
cated horse, aged 26 years, sold by 
the late Dr. William Key for $10,000, 
and who later bought him back, is 
dead. The horse first attracted at- 
tention at the World's Fair, Chicago 



BECK CONSIDERING "SPLIT.** 

Whether to "split" commission with 
the agents is said to be once again 
occupying the thoughts of Martin 
Beck. Early in the summer it was 
announced in the Orpheum Circuit's 
New York offices, to the agents book- 
ing through it, that commencing Aug. 
1, the "split commission" plan (as 
practiced by the United Booking Offic- 
es) would go into effect. August 1 
passed, however, with nothing further 
heard, nor have the agents had any 
part of their commissions held back 
by the Orpheum people. 

The subject was revived last week. 
It is reported Mr. Beck said he would 
think it well over before reaching a def- 
inite decision. 

Monday Mr. Beck left New York for 
a trip over the entire Orpheum Cir- 
cuit. He will be away three weeks. 

While away, Mr. Beck will go to 
the northwest, inspecting the recent 
additions to the Circuit at Calgary 
and Edmonton, Canada. He said be- 
fore leaving New York Tuesday that 
Kegina would be looked over by him 
for another northwestern location. 



BASEBALL ACTS. 

Thomas J. Gray is writing a new act 
for Rube Marquard and Blossom 
Seeley, to be used by the to-be-formed 
vaudeville alliance when Miss Seeley 
has completed her engagement with 
"The Charity Girl." Mr. Gray also is 
framing up a baseball act for Ger- 
many Schaefer and Nick Altrock, the 
two clowns of the Washington Ameri- 
cans. 

The vaudeville stage will see Mike 
Donlin soon, associated with Tom 
Lewis who lately closed a short tour 
in "The Yankee Prince." Mr. Donlin 
played with the Pittsburgh National 
League team the past summer. 

The couple are "beaking in" their 
act this week, and are first regularly 
dated up at Akron, O., Oct. 28, with 
the other Feiber & Shea house at 
Voungstown the week following. 

It is reported Lewis and Donlin are 
asking $1,000 or more weekly. 

Boston, Oct. 9. 
Bill Sweeney, the hitting second 
baseman of the Boston Nationals, fin- 
ishing at the bottom this season, is the 
hcadliner at Loew's Orpheum this 
week. His act is a good one. He 
has a monolog on baseball and then 
answers questions about the game put 
to him by knowledge-seeking fans. Bill 
says the act was framed for him by 
lim Corbett. 



RETRIAL ORDERED. 

The Appellate Term of the Supreme 
Court Monday reversed the City Court 
judgment recovered by Joe Meyers in 
his action against the Great Howard, 
for monies alleged to be due him 
(Meyers) as manager for the ventrilo- 
quist. 

At the new trial, the defense will be 
permitted to introduce evidence tend- 
ing to prove Meyers is an agent with- 
in the provisions of the Employment 
Agency Law, although posing as a 
"manager." 

Dennis F. O'Brien and M I.. Malc- 
vinsky appearrd for Howard; Leon 
I.aski is the attorney for Meyers. 



DELMAR WITH LOEW. 

When the new offices of the Loew- 
Sullivan-Considine Circuits are taken 
possession of today, tomorrow or 
Monday, Jule Delmar will probably 
be found in the booking department of 
the Loew Circuit, over which Joe 
Schenck, general booking manager, 
presides. 

Mr. Delmar has been "loaned" to 
the Loew Circuit by the Shuberts. 

This week the Alhambra, Stamford, 
Conn., and Jones' theatre, Brooklyn, 
returned to the Loew booking sheets. 



TWO "SINGLES" ENGAGED. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
The engagement is announced of 
Van Hoven, the magician, to Annie 
Kent. Both are "singles" in vaude- 
ville. Miss Kent was formerly of 
Kelly and Kent. The wedding will 
take place at the conclusion of her 
Orpheum Circuit route, in January. 



CHANGING TEAMS. 

William Fox is negotiating with 
Hawthorne and Burt to replace Ray- 
mond and Caverly in "The Girl from 
Brighton/' the latter team retiring to 
return to vaudeville. 



EPIDEMIC OF MALARIA. 

Chicago, Oct 9. 
Signor Figaro, a wire walker with 
Ringlings' circus, was brought home 
from Memphis this week very ill with 
malaria. He reports that thirty-six 
members of the company were taken 
sick with the same disease during the 
past few wekt. 



GRIZZLY DANCING BEAR. 

A bear that talks, dances "rag- 
time" and wrestles has been captured 
by Freeman Bernstein as a comedy 
act. Frank Stevens is the trainer. 



BULGER FOR VAUDEVILLE. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
Harry Bulger is preparing to go 
into vaudeville under the direction of 
Mort H Singer. 



SAILINGS. 

The Lusitania Oct. 9 carried away 
Gene Greene and Mary Garstang. Pau- 
line left Oct. 5 on the Minnewaska, and 
the Cedric, Oct. 3, had Mrs. Little Al- 
right. The Lindon Sisters sailed Sept. 
28. 

Tomorrow, on the President Lincoln, 
go the Randow Bros. 

The passage Iqj each was booked 
through the Paul Tausig Agency. 



REORGANIZED FROHMAN CO. 

Daniel Frohman's production of "The 
Diamond Necklace" will retake to 
vaudeville Oct. 21 at the Majestic, Chi- 
cago. 

After the first engagement of the 
sketch at the Union Square a reorgani- 
zation took place. The new cast is 
headed by Helen Robertson. The other 
principals are Mitchell Lewis, Victor 
Benoit, William Kent, Caroline Wolf. 

The temporary withdrawal .of the 
piece led to a report of its discontinu- 
ance. 



Gene Buck and Dave Stamper, who 
have formed a partnership at son<< 
writing, have four numbers with /i«'« 
feld's "Follies." 



VARIETY 



VERY CLASSY CLUB DEP'T 

PROP OSED B Y SHUBERTS 

In Connection With Vaudeville Bookings. Shubert Stars 

and Production Numbers Available. Will Prove 

Strong Force Against Monopolistic Club 

Department of U. B. O. 



Providing the Shuberts carry out 
their present intention to organize a 
"Club Department" in connection with 
their vaudeville bookings, the monop- 
olistic branch of the United Booking 
Offices, which has attempted to swal- 
low whole the private entertainment 
patronage, will find a strong force 
opposed to it. 

The transporting of the entire com- 
pany of "The Merry Countess" to 
Newport some weeks ago is said to 
have suggested to the Shuberts that 
the many private socials in New York 
and suburbs which call for profession- 
al entertainment during the evening, 
might be best supplied by talent from 
productions. Vaudeville has furnished 
the "Clubs" (as the private entertain- 
ments are technically termed) with 
material for many years. The United 
Booking Offices vainly attempted to 
obtain a monopoly through its usual 
methods. Though successful in har- 
assing and annoying many of the 
agents who make private entertain- 
ments a specialty, the big agency met 
many rebuffs. 

The Shubert Club Department, when 
organized, will be placed in charge of 
an experienced man in that booking 
branch. He will have authority to 
contract for any one or more special 
features from the various Shubert pro- 
ductions. 



KEITH HOUSES* BUSINESS. 

The business at the B. F. Keith New 
York theatres (formerly Percy G. Wil- 
liams' Circuit) has shown no improve- 
ment of any marked degree with the 
incoming of fall weather. 

The Colonial and Bronx the first 
part of the week were rather light in 
attendance. The Orpheum, Brooklyn, 
had a fair sized house Monday evening, 
with the mezzanine floor rather bare, 
which indicated much "paper" taken in 
at the door. "Paper" was plentiful 
also at the Colonial. 

The Fifth Avenue had a fairly good 
attendance Monday evening, although 
the Fifth Avenue (Proctor's) of late 
has been starting the week with less 
business than comes in from Wednes- 
day on, when the theatre plays to ca- 
pacity for the remainder of the week 
if the bill is voted a good one. 

Hammcrstein's picked up a little 
Monday, over the display of several 
weeks past. The Union Square, Keith's 
nvvn house, was below the theatre's 
normal condition on a Monday night. 



MANAGER IN ACCIDENT. 

Westbrook, Me., Oct. 9. 
Last night, while Wallace O. Gould 
and his wife were returning to Lewis- 
ton from Lisbon Falls, the auto they 
were driving turned turtle, pinning Mr. 
Gould beneath the machine. He was 
taken to a nearby house, where he lies 
unconscious most of the time. Mrs. 



Gould escaped with a few scratches. 
The injured man is manager of the 
Pastime theatre at Brunswick, Me. 



ACROBAT HURT IN "BUjL SHOW." 
New Orleans, Oct. 9. 

Salim Khammar, an Arabian acro- 
bat with Two Bills show, was pain- 
fully injured here Sunday. He sus- 
tained a fall of twenty feet, fracturing 
an arm and receiving body bruises. 

Con Mullen, foreman with the show, 
was attacked by Thane Ives, a former 
employee whom he had discharged and 
stabbed so severely that he had to be 
removed to a hospital. Ives was ar- 
rested. 



DAILY BOOKING MEETINGS. 

Daily booking meetings are held in 
the Consolidated Booking Offices by 
M. R. Sheedy, Walter Keefe and I. 
Fluegelman, who represent the prin- 
cipal circuits booking through the 
agency. 

New houses added are assigned to 
the bookers in charge of the territory. 
At a meeting held last Friday, it is 
said, this system of operatir* the of- 
fice was agreed upon. An outside or 
reception office man is to be secured. 

The daily booking conferences are 
mostly to prevent an agent "slipping 
over" an act to one manager, without 
the knowledge of another, who may 
have turned down the same act for 
some reason. 



GENE HUGHES'S LITTLE TRIP. 

A little trip will be started by Gene 
Hughes today or tomorrow, lasting 
for two weeks. The agent will go as 
far west as Omaha, incidentally meet- 
ing Mrs. Gene Hughes, as present on 
the Orpheum Circuit. 



KELLERMANN BOOKED SOUTH. 

A long tour is contemplated by Will- 
iam Morris for his Annette Kellermann 
Road Show. Following the Shuberts 
city time, upon which the combina- 
tion is now playing, the troupe will go 
South, commencing in December and 
work toward the Coast. 



BASEBALL WRITER'S SKETCH. 

The newest sketch for vaudeville, 
turned out by Boozeman Bulger, the 
baseball writer, is called "Big Bluff." 
It will first be shown in New York 
Nov. 4, at the Union Square. 

Mr. Bulger has been importuned by 
several of the leaguers combinations 
forming for vaudeville, to write ve- 
hicles for them. Mr. Bulger authored 
"Swat Milligan" for vaudeville. "Swat" 
is the mythical baseball character Mr. 
Bulger made famous in the New York 
World. 



OHAS. DOUTRICK DROPS DEAD. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

Charles Doutrick, one of the best 
known local booking agents, dropped 
dead last night after attending the 
vaudeville performance at the Palace. 

Doutrick and his niece, Anna Mont- 
gomery, here on a visit from Los An- 
geles, had just left the theatre when 
he was stricken. He was assisted to 
the City Hall across the street where 
physicians were called. 

His condition pronounced serious he 




CHARLES H. DOUTRICK 

was removed to the Practitioners' 
Hospital, where he died a few hours 
later. 

Doutrick became known as the 
"Dean of Agents" when George Castle, 
the Chicago pioneer, ceased his activi- 
ties in the field. Doutrick first became 
known in San Francisco in 1885 as a 
song and parody writer. 

He was credited with having been 
responsible for John Cort's start in 
theatricals. 



FRANK BOSTOCK DIES. 

London, Oct. 9. 

Frank Bostock, the animal king, died 
at noon yesterday of influenza, brain 
fever supervening. He was ill but one 
week and was preparing to visit Amer- 
ica with another "Consul," a trained 
monkey. The deceased was 46 years 
old. 

Bostock's first jungle show was at 
the Chicago World's Fair. He was at- 
tacked by animals six times while giv- 
ing exhibitions, and appeared with 
lions at the age of fifteen. 



MADAME BORELLI DEAD. 

London, Oct. 9. 
Madame Borelli, of the Borellis, died 
here suddenly. 



Virginia Brissac Company opens Sat 
urday night at Long Beach, Los An 
geles, for a return engagement. 



FRANK CLARK BY HIMSELF. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

Frank Clark, for the past several 
years Chicago representative of the 
Ted Snyder Publishing Co., resigned 
from that position this week to estab- 
lish a business of his own which will 
be known as the Frank Clark Music 
Pub. Co. 

It is understood Clark will acquire 
the controlling interest of the Marvin 
Lee Music Co., a new firm recently 
incorporated. Flo Jacobson will be 
associated with Clark & Lee. 



ATTORNEY GENERAL ASKED. 

(Continued from page 3.) 

manager for five years, and deducting fifty 
per cent, thereof, as their services, be ad. 
Judged null and void and that the same be 
delivered up and cancelled. 

"B. That the defendant be required to ac- 
count for all moneys received by It under 
said contract and that plaintiff recover from 
the defendant the amount found to be doe 
on such accounting." 

In the 54th Street Court Monday the 

case of the Marimba Band vs. Vaude- 
ville Collection Agency came up and 
was adjourned. The promoter of the 
band act has asked the return of about 
$400 he alleges the Agency wthheld 
from his salary while playing in thea- 
tres booked by the United Booking 
Offices. Dennis F. O'Brien and M. L. 
Malevinsky appear for the act; Mau- 
rice Goodman, president of the Collec- 
tion Agency, also represents it as at- 
torney in this action, and David Stein- 
hardt appears for the Dan Casey 
Agency, which has been brought into 
the proceedings. 



"P. G." COMES IN. 

Broadway greeted Percy G. Williams 
Tuesday morning, when the ex-vaude- 
ville magnate, now a gentleman farmer 
with a permanent address at Islip, Long 
Island, came through the East River 
tunnel. 

Lots of people wanted to start lots 
of reports about "P. G.'s" return at this 
time. They were he had heard about 
the business his former vaudeville the- 
atres were doing under the B. F. Keith 
management, and had decided to per- 
sonally inspect to realize the unlooked 
for changed condition; that Mr. Will- 
iams would consult his attorney re- 
garding reclaiming the houses for pro- 
tection to the property, and other 
things; but it all simmered down that 
Mr. Williams merely passed through 
the city on his way to the first world 
series game. His son, Vic, beat the 
pater to the ticket booth by eighteen 
hours. The extenuating circumstances 
for the son getting ahead of the father 
were the Giants said they couldn't do 
their regular show unless Vic was there 
to root. 



CORBETT WILL PULL THROUGH. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 

The condition of James J. Corbett, 
who was operated on at the Jefferson 
Hospital last week, is reported at 
steadily improving. 

It is now expected by the physicians 
that Corbett will recover, although his 
condition at first was thought very 
dangerous. 



T. B. C.'S SECOND GARDEN. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

The Theatre Booking Corporation 
added another Garden to its list Mon- 
day, when placing the new Garden 
theatre, Dallas, on its books. 

Acts routed by the T. B. C. will 
jump from the Garden, Kansas City, 
to the Texas house. 



CHARLES KIRALFY HERE. 

Charles Imre Kiralfy, eldest son of 
Imre Kiralfy, arrived in New York 
from Europe this week to take per- 
sonal charge of the negotiations begun 
by his father with the Pennsylvania- 
Long Island railroad interests for the 
building of a "White City" at Jamaici 
to cost $5,000,000, as announced in last 
week's VARwrr. 



VARIETY 



ZIMMERMAN BUILDING TWO 

MORE IN PHILADELPHIA 

Makes Circuit of Four Pop Vaudeville Theatres In That 

City. Oirard Avenue and 26th Street Location for 

Third House. Site for Fourth Undisclosed. 



Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 

J. Fred Zimmerman is to give this 
city two more big new theatres to be 
devoted to high-class vaudeville at pop- 
alar prices on the line with the bills 
offered at the Liberty and Keystone, 
which houses Mr. Zimmerman built 
and is operating individually. This will 
give Mr. Zimmerman four houses play- 
ing "pop" vaudeville in this city. M. 
W. Taylor will be the general man- 
ager of all four. 

Ground for the first of the new 
houses has already been bought and 
paid for. Mr. Zimmerman has pur- 
chased the Northwestern Market Build- 
ing at 26th street and Girard avenue. 
He will begin operations within a few 
days to erect a magnificent and en- 
tirely up-to-date theatre equipped with 
the very latest modern improvements. 

There has been a wild scramble by 
others who had announced their in- 
tention of building one or more vaude- 
ville theatres in this city, only one of 
which has materialized. Want of lo- 
cation without opposition checked the 
plan to build three houses which were 
to be linked with the United Booking 
Offices. There are several other pro- 
jects standing motionless. 

Plans for the new Zimmerman house, 
however, have > already been prepared 
so that work can be started at once. 
The neighborhood selected is really one 
of the very few that could be chosen 
without encountering strong opposi- 
tion. 

Mr. Zimmerman has also secured an 
option on another large plot of ground 
in another section of the city, and 's 
having plans drawn for the erection 
of his fourth local house. 

The building of the third house has 
been kept secret until this week. Noth- 
ing will be known about the fourth 
until everything is ready to start build- 
ing. 

With the opposition given the United 
small time houses here by the three 
houses operated by F. G. Nixon-Nird- 
linger, the building up of a circuit of 
four houses by Mr. Zimmerman is 
bound to add interest to the many- 
cornered fight for patronage among 
the "pop" houses in the most rapidly 
growing vaudeville field in the coun- 
try. 



OSCAR STOPS PAYMENTS. 

Oscar Hammerstein's falling out 
with his children has taken on the 
proportions of a feud. When, last 
week, all those reported to be nego- 
tiating for the purchase of Hammer- 
stein's Victoria fhcatre and its United 
Booking Offices franchise, were noti- 
fied by the attorneys for his children 
that any assumption of the lease by 
purchase carried with it a liability 
for the payment of $200 a week, which 
Hammerstein had bound himself to re- 
mit regularly, there was a cessation of 
progress toward the transfer of the 
property. 



Tuesday Hammerstein notified the 
Equitable Trust Co. he will hereafter 
make no payments. A year or so ago 
Mrs. Malvina Hammerstein obtained 
a divorce from Oscar, at which time 
he deposited with the trust company 
3,398 shares of the Hammerstein 
Amusement Co. and deeds to some 
property in Brooklyn, to guarantee the 
$200 weekly payments to his daughters. 
Meantime, Mrs. Hammerstein died. On 
receipt of Mr. Hammerstein's letter, 
the trust company announced its in- 
tention of selling the securities to pro- 
tect the interests of their clients, the 
Hammerstein children. 

It is reported that Hammerstein is 
making this move to obtain a clear title 
to his Victoria in order to be in a po- 
sition to make his contemplated sale. 
It is understood that he will deposit a 
sum said to be over $200,000 in cash 
which will serve as adequate guarantee 
for the payments he agreed to make. 
This, however, he denies, declaring that 
he will not in future support his chil- 
dren who are, he says, now grown up 
and capable of supporting themselves. 

The Victoria franchise and the forth- 
coming opening of the new Palace, 
New York, are about the most talked 
of things in vaudeville these days. It 
is reported the United Agency has 
gone so far as to prepare to book vau- 
deville into the Palace, independently 
of that agency if necessary, to circum- 
vent the conditions of the Hammer- 
stein franchise, which prohibits an- 
other U. B. O. booking in the neigh- 
borhood except with Hammerstein's 
consent. 

Last Saturday Stella Hammerstein. 
a daughter of Oscar's, was married to 
Frederick Lioiel Keating, a New York 
attorney. None of the Hammerstein 
family was present at the ceremony, 
excepting William, Stella's brother. 



"ETERNAL WALTZ" HELD OVER. 

Buffalo, Oct. 9. 
The Martin Beck-Jos. Hart's pro- 
duction of "The Eternal Waltz" was 
held over for the second week at 
Shea's. It is doing big business. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
"The Eternal Waltz," headlining the 
Palace program next week, may be 
held for a run. 



C.F.U. RECOMMENDS NEW ORDER. 

As the outcome of the disagreements 
between the White Rats Actors' 
Union and the New York Central Fed- 
erated Union, the General Executive 
Committee of the latter body has ex- 
pressed the opinion that the way is 
clear for the organization of a new 
union of performers holding affiliation 
with the C. F. U. 

"As the White Rats Actors' Union 
of America," says the Committee, "has 
claimed to be a national union, lu-nce 
not necessarily bound to affiliate with 
the C. F. U. and the C. F. U. having 
been declared to be a recruiting sta- 
tion simply of the A. F. of L., no 
apparent reason exists to prevent the 
organization of a legitimate and loyal 
actors' union." 

At the same meeting of the Commit- 
tee the decision was reached that Jas. 
L. Barry be recommended to supply 
entertainments and club shows for la- 
bor bodies affiliated with the C. F. U. 
Barry has long been a delegate to the 
C. F. U. and until the W. R. A. U. 
became affiliated with the central 
council was the official entertainment 
provider for labor unions. The Rats 
Union protested against this and 
Barry's name was banished from the 
official organ. It has now been re- 
placed. 

The Hebrew Variety Actors' Union 
No. 5, by a vote of the Executive Com- 
mittee, has become recognized by the 
C. F. U. as affiliated with the central 
council. It will receive the support 
of the labor board. Representations 
were made that since its affiliation 
with the White Rats Actors' Union, 
Local No. 5 had received scant cour- 
tesy from the parent organization, and 
the delegate of No. 5 asked that his 
organization be recognized. 

The letter of O'Brien & Malc- 
vinsky on behalf of the W. R. A| U., 
which had been referred to the Gen- 
eral Executive Committee, was voted 
tabled indefinitely. 



"MERMAID" RIGHTS GRANTED. 

H. L. Bowdoin, inventor of the mer- 
maid apparatus and water spectacle 
placed at the New York Hippodrome 
by the Shuberts when it was opened 
and used as a feature there up to this 
season, has granted the rights to it for 
all countries to Joseph Hart and Clay- 
ton White. Messrs. Haft and White 
are working out the details of a vaude- 
ville act in which this will be utilized 
and will produce it immediately in a 
big act, employing about twenty-five 
girls. 



TRA1NOR DECISION AWAITED. 

Justice Greenbaum is expected to 
hand down a decision late this week 
in the application of Val Trainor for 
a premptory writ of mandamus com- 
pelling the White Rats Actors' Union 
to reinstate him to membership. 

Argument was heard in Special 
Term, Supreme Court, last Friday. 
Counsel for the performers' order con- 
tested the demand for a writ, quoting 
at great length a precedent in which 
Justice Ingraham decided an associa- 
tion could determine what constituted 
a sufficient charge for trial and expul- 
sion. 

Murray & Summers, representing 
Trainor, contended the precedent cov- 
ered only the action of a voluntary 
association and could not be under- 
stood to refer to a corporation under 
the state laws. The court directed the 
lawyers to file briefs. 



CHANGING TO TWO-A-DAY. 

Pawtuckct, Oct. 9 
Keith's theatre, commencing Oct. 21, 
will play two shows daily instead of 
three as at present. Pawtuckct is too 
small to make a "supper show" worth 
while. It is easier also to -» i lire acts 
to "cut" salary for two allows daily 
than when asking them to work three 



MERGER ON COAST. 

San Francisco, Oct. 9. 

The consolidation of the Honolulu 
Amusement Co. and the Liberty thea- 
tre interests here, is understood to be 
a shrewd move to block competitive 
bidding for attractions. The merger is 
known as the Consolidated Amuse- 
ment Co. It has a capital stock of 
$3,000. 

The deal covers the Liberty, Bijou, 
Empire and Savoy. Orpheum proper- 
ties are not included in the transac- 
tion. These theatres are leased for 
three years and under the manage- 
ment of Robert R. McGreer, formerly 
manager of the Liberty. 

G. T. Chong, formerly president of 
the Liberty Co., becomes president of 
the Consolidated. The Liberty will be 
the only house giving real vaudeville. 
The Savoy, Park and others are ex- 
pected to conduct a policy of four acts 
and pictures. 

The announcement here that the 
Consolidated will seek to bring about 
a circuit covering Shanghai, Hong- 
kong and Manila, is not taken seri- 
ously. 



BANKS SHUTTING DOWN. 

The banks and loaning companies are 
shutting down upon mortgage upon 
theatrical properties, according to re- 
ports. 

While the demand for theatres on 
lease has never been healthier than 
at present, and the excessive rentals 
paid are the wonderment of the pro- 
fession, the realty experts say the the- 
atrical field is overcrowded. They 
consider advances upon theatrical real 
estate hazardous. 

The attitude of the monied men is 
said to be causing some embarrass- 
ment to projected ventures that de- 
pended upon them for building loans. 



DAZIE'S DRUM DUTY. 

Drumming has been taken up by Da- 
zic, as a duty, for insertion into her 
new act for vaudeville. Under con- 
tracts signed by the dancer previously 
to appearing in "The Merry Coun- 
tess" at the Casino, she is bound for an 
appearance at Keith's Cleveland Hip- 
podrome, Feb. 3, next. 

The work with the sticks is being 
taught Dazie by the drummer of the 
Casino orchestra. 



AN ELASTIC TITLE. 

The new "girl act" Rawson and 
Clare are preparing to take over the 
Sullivan-Considine Circuit, has an elas- 
tic title. The number is named "Mary's 
Party" and features Frances Clare. Guy 
Rawson is the comedian. 

The two principals have agreed that 
if any local manager on the S-C chain 
wishes to honor some local resident, 
the first name of the local man's wife 
will be substituted during th? engage- 
ment in his town. 

Thus in Seattle Rawson and Clare's 
turn may be billed as "Louisa's Party," 
while in Portland it could be called 
"Lizzie's Party," the title standing at 
"Mary's" only when no request has 
been received to change it. 



Hibbert and Kennedy arrc a new 
vaudeville team. The mem! ■ v\cr<: 
formerly of Hibh'-it and W'.irren and 
Kennedy and Kennedy 



8 



VARIETY 



STRONG EFFORT TO "CLEAN UP" 
IS MADE B Y EAST ERN WHEEL 

House and Show Managers Sharply Instructed by Letter 

They Must Keep Within Decent Confines. Western 

Wheel Guaranteeing Shows $1,400 Weekly, 

To Advance Burlesque 



"We have built up a large and in- 
telligent clientele in our houses, one 
that enjoys clean burlesque, and we 
do not propose to have them driven 
away. Neither do we propose to have 
our business ruined because of the 
traveling managers who cannot dis- 
tinguish what should and what should 
not be contained in a performance." 

The above is an extract from a let- 
ter written last week by the Colum- 
bia Amusement Co. to its travelinK 
managers on the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel. The letter was dictated by 
Sam A. Scribner, general manager of 
the Columbia Co., following the return 
of the Censor Committee, after a trip 
over the Wheel surveying the attrac- 
tions for this season. 

A copy of the letter, with another 
addressed to the show managers, was 
sent to all shows. From the full let- 
ters aa written it would appear the 
Eastern Wheel Censors were not whol- 
ly pleased at the performances on the 
Wheel. 

A paragraph of the letter to the 
resident manager said: "We positively 
insist upon you looking at the opening 
performance of every show. Also that 
you notify your house attaches that 
under no circumstances arc you to be 
disturbed or called out. Let your 
treasurer count up the first perform- 
ance and do not leave the house until 
the curtain falls. Then have an under- 
standing with your house leader that 
if anything is slipped over at any other 
performance he shall immediately 
make a note of it and report same to 
you." 

There is a warning also against "in- 
flammable billing" such as "hot show" 
or "sizzling performance." The house 
manager is informed it has been re- 
ported a $50 bill more than once has 
been distributed among the house staff. 

In the remarks to the local man- 
agers, the Columbia Circuit evidently 
intends to convey that where a travel- 
ing manager at the Monday matinee 
invites the house manager out for a 
drink or cigar, that is the time when 
the local man should hang onto his 
seat. It's an old burlesque trick, that, 
when there's something coming off in 
the performance the traveling manager 
doesn't want the house manager to 
criticize, he attempts to get him out 
of the way for the moment. It has 
happened as well that a "clean show" 
Monday afternoon isn't a "clean show" 
Tuesday. 

Notice is given the house manager 
he shall report immediately any trav- 
eling manager who threatens the local 
man with dismissal through headquar- 
ters, if the former interferes with a 
performance This has bearing upon a 
subject that has been much talked 
about in burlesque during the past tw« 
seasons. It is claimed certain Eastern 
Wheel shrtws have passed along nn 



disturbed through their owners being 
influential. 

Early in the season an Eastern Bur- 
lesque Wheel show appearing around 
New York was voted a disgrace to the 
stage, through the filthy "business" 
and innuendo in dialog it contained. 
Many people are watching to see if 
that production was "censored." It 
was said shortly after the season 
opened the show had been rewritten, 
but reports since then have stated 
that practically no change occurred. 



Chicago, Oct. 9. 

Hurtig <& Seamon's "Girls From 
Happyland," an Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel attraction at the Columbia this 
week, is the most unclean show that 
has ever appeared in that theatre. 

The show is the same as when play- 
ing around New York early in the 
season, excepting for the changes de- 
manded by the manager of the Colum- 
bia after the opening performance. 

It is said a new book is in prepara- 
tion. "The Girls From Happyland" 
needs an exterminator of the filth in 
it. 



Cincinnati. Oct. 9. 

The Empire Circuit Co. (Western 
Burlesque Wheel), commencing this 
week, guarantees its shows $1,400 
weekly, with privilege of fifty per cent, 
of the gross, on the understanding that 
every production reaches the standard 
in production set by the Governing 
Committee. 

Col. James E. Fennessy confirmed 
the report of the guarantee. Col. Hen- 
nessy said to a Variety- representative 
yesterday: "The Empire Circuit is 
making every effort to offer induce- 
ments to standard shows with new 
ideas and clever burlesques. Our 
shows are vastly improved this sea- 
son, but we are still after better at- 
tractions all the time. In giving 
managers guarantees in order that they 
may know in advance their season is 
protected from the financial side, we 
do so as an inducement for the pro- 
duction of standard high-class bur- 
lesque shows." 



BURLESQUE AT ROYAL. 

Montreal, Oct. 9. 

The Theatre Royal is to have stock 
burlesque beginning Oct. 14. Philip J. 
Fisher has taken the house over an»l 
signed Ed. C. Jordan to act as pro- 
ducer and principal comedian. 

The Royal formerly played Western 
Wheel Burlesque shows It was in 
the L. Lawrence "pop" circuit until a 
week or so ago when it was dropped. 



BURLESQUE SWAP UNDECIDED. 

Up until late in the week the ex- 
change of Louisville and Indianapolis 
by the Eastern and Western Burlesque 
Wheels had not been definitely closed. 
"Agreements will pass this week, if 
they are to pass at all," said one bur- 
lesque man. 

It is understood there is an element 
in both of the Wheels standing out 
against his newest reciprocity deal. 
Herman Fehr was in New York most 
of this week. James Fennessy was in 
Cincinnati while James Whallen was 
in Louisville. No announcement of a 
change of policy was made in the Ken- 
tucky stand. 



"WIDOWS' " NEW PEOPLE. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 
Lou Powers, Sam Micals, Edith 
Powers, Mike Dowd and Fred Manny, 
the latter musical director, are the new 
members joining "The Winning Wid- 
ows" show here this week. 



BURLESQUE SHOW ATTACHED. 

Jersey City, Oct. 9. 

An attachment was laid against Gor- 
don & North's "World of Pleasure" at 
the Gayety, Hoboken, Monday, by 
Hudspeth, Rysdyckman & Garrison, 
acting for James C. Morton. 

The papers called for $3,000, alleged 
by Morton to be due him by the firm 
.from his former connection with "The 
Merry Whirl." A suit brought by 
Morton for an accounting of profits 
in that show, also belonging to Gor- 
don & North, was later discontinued. 

Gordon & North deny they are in- 
debted to Morton, claiming he broke 
his contract with them. Morton Is 
now with the Gertrude Hoffmann Re- 
vue. 



THREE YEARS' CONTRACT. 

Toledo, Oct. 9. 
A contract for three years has been 
signed by Ben Welch to appear in 
burlesque under the management of 
R. K. Hynicka. Mr. Welch is now 
heading the Ben Welc4i Burlesquers 
under Mr. Hynicka's direction. 



LEAVE "GAY WHITE WAY." 

Ryan and Lee close this week with 
Gordon & North's Eastern Wheel 
Burlesque show, "The Gay White 
Way," at St. Louis and will resume 
their vaudeville dates. 

Frank Winfield, a vaudevillian, was 
sent on this week to replace the 
dancers. 



Alice Magill has joined the Harry 
Hastings show. 



SOFT FOR MANCHESTER. 

Bob Manchester is back home on his 
farm in Painesville, O., while his East- 
ern Burlesque show i playing the 
Wheel. Manchester spjnds his time 
riding about the farm in a machine. He 
is Exalted Ruler of the Elks in his 
home town. 

Recently the nomination for mayor 
was tendered to the burlesque man. He 
declined in a speech which is quoted as 
a masterpiece of oratory. Bob ducked 
politics on the theory that he was novfl 
well supplied with friends, but if he 
ran for a public position he would lose 
many of them Only Bob didn't put it 
in just those words when he waved 
the laurels aside 



KINEAMAOOLOR CO. ACTIVE. 

The Kinemacolor Co. of America 
is actively starting a campaign for 
placing its motion pictures in natural 
colors on the market. The Kinema- 
color people have been rather quiet 
since putting out the Coronation and 
Durbar films. Under the direction of 
President Henry J. Brock, however, 
for the past three months, preparations 
have been going forward for the pres- 
ent splurge. During that time over 
300 subjects of one, two and three reels 
each have been completed, and are 
on the market. 

The colored picture, as an attrac- 
tion and a novelty on a program, has 
been looked forward to for some time, 
as a regular "release." The Kinema- 
color Co. apparently intends to oper- 
ate in competition with the entire 
moving picture industry, having a 
monopoly in its own division for 
America, under the Urban-Smith pat- 
ents. 

In the Kinemacolor headquarters in 
the Mecca Building, New York, is a 
large exhibition room, where private 
views of the films are given. There 
is also a safe deposit vault with a 
capacity to store 2,000 reels. 

During the past week, following its 
announcement, the Kinemacolor Co. 
has received many applications for ser- 
vice. Contracts are bping closed that 
will place the colored pictures in the 
better class of vaudeville and picture 
houses. 

David Miles, one of the best-known 
of moving picture directors, has been 
with the Kinemacolor people for sev- 
eral months, in charge of the dramatic 
departments. Mr. Miles has established 
three dramatic stock companies at 
Whitestone, L. I., and the east, be- 
sides taking the three original com- 
panies comprising seventy people to 
western territory. Two will go to the 
Kinemacolor Studios at Los Angeles, 
the other to Colorado. Anita Hendries 
Miles is with the companies as sce- 
nario editor. Frank Woods and Jack 
Le Saint will remain in charge of the 
players upon David Miles returning to 
New York. 

In the western companies are many 
well-known artists, including Mabel 
Van Buren, Stella Bazetto, Ruby Ross, 
Ethel Davis, Linda A. Griffeth, Gaston 
Bell, Chas. Fleming, Jack Brammcll. 
Chas. Haydon, William Brown, Guy 
Oliver, Cecil Magnus, Robert Broder- 
ick, Ernest Joy, Murdock MacQuarne. 



PROTEAN TRAVESTY. 

James Leonard will produce a new 
protean travesty act, in which he will 
make twenty-four changes of costume. 
It will be called "Kidding Hamlet:' 
In it he will play the King, Queen. 
Hamlet, Polonius and Ophelia. But 
one assistant will be required, to play 
the Ghost. 



FIRST TIME IN ST. LOUIS. 

St. Louis, Oct. 9. 
Although in vaudeville for several 
seasons, next week will be the first 
time William Rock and Maude Fulton 
appear in this city as a team. They 
are headliners of the Columbia pro- 
gram. 



Charles Emerson Cook, general 
press representative for David Belae* -o 
after an illness, is around. 



VARIETY 




niETY 



Published We«kly 



CHICAGO 

Majestic Theatre Bid*. 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 

LONDON 

6 Green St., Leicester 8q. 

W. BUCHANAN TAYLOR 

PARIS 

66 bis. Rue Saint Dldler 

EDWARD O. KRNDRBW 

BERLIN 
II Karl St 
B. A. LEVY 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP AND 
MANAGEMENT OF VARIETY 

Published weekly at New York City re- 
quired by the act of August 14, 1911. 

Name of Post-offloe Address 

Editor and publisher, 

Slme Silverman, 1536 Broadway 

Managing Editor, 

Alfred M. Greaaon, 16S6 Broadway 

Business Manager, 

Charles J. Freeman. 1636 Broadway 

Charles J. Freeman, business manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th 
day of Sept., 1912. Jenie Jacobs, No. 3, 
Notary Public, New York County. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Advertising copy for current Issue must 
reach New York office by 6 p. m. Wednesday. 

Advertisements by mall should be accom- 
panl cd by remittance. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Annual $4 

Foreign 6 

Single copies, 10 cents. 

Entered as second-class matter at New York. 
Vol. XXVIII. October 11, 1912 No. 6 

The dividing line between the two- 
a-day and three-a-day vaudeville hous- 
es is very thinly discernible just now. 
There are some actors who look up- 
on the theatres playing three shows 
as beneath their artistic dignity. Other 
artists in vaudeville, appreciating the 
conditions and accepting vaudeville as 
the managers do, a business proposi- 
tion, are agreed that the vaudeville 
which offers them their salary or at 
least fair compensation, is the place 
for them to appear in, with the mat- 
ter of the number of shows an after- 
consideration. 

Vaudeville has reached its day when 
the artist might better consult himself 
than the opinions of his friends and 
associates. With big time vaudeville 
in the throes of its own strangulation 
methods, and no opposition coming 
over the horizon, the small time is 
in reality a God-send to the actor. 
It is assuming the place an opposition 
circuit would have held, if there had 
been an opposition that could have 
been perpetuated. That did not hap- 
pen, thanks to an actors' organiza- 
tion so wonderfully misdirected that 
none of its surplus was allowed to 
be put into a channel that might have 
meant hundreds of thousands of dol- 
lars in salaries to its members. The 
very least that could have happened 
would have been that the salary would 
have been held up to its standard, 
that standard being determined by de- 
mand, and that demand only arriving 
through an opposition, which creates 
competitive bidding for the services 
of an act. 

Since the same actors' organization 

permitted its opportunity to bolster 

up an opposition to fall away (when 
the opposition circuit passed also). 
there ha< seemed to he no more ef- 



fort on its part to protect members 
from a monopoly. Granted that the 
organization has now invested its 
monies in a very pretty club house 
that will be a comfortable lounging 
place for those acts without engage- 
ments, but the picture of a club house 
in New York will be little solace to 
the actor playing Cleveland or Provi- 
dence at a wage he barely breaks even 
on, below the amount paid him last 
season or the season before that, and 
much below the amount his services 
are worth to vaudeville. 

Another actors' society, originally 
conceived to protect the vaudevillian, 
did a very nice somersault recently by 
electing to its Board of Control the 
greatest avowed enemy of the vaude- 
ville artist who has ever lived to make 

good his threats. When the actors 
themselves will see their control tak- 
en under the wjng of the managers, 
without a protest, and let slip the 
chances to guard their interest, it could 
hardly be expected that any but the 
present condition would arrive. 



Meantime, without the aid of the 

actor in any way, the "small time" 

has stepped in, to show the "big 

time" several things in the line of 

drawing patronage, and to provide a 

haven for the oppressed act. There 

are so many of the latter the single 
danger of this moment is that they 
will over-crowd the smaller houses. 

• 

What the vaudeville actor has to 
consider is whether he is worthy of 
his hire; whether the small time which 
can and is willing to pay his salary- 
should have his services; whether it 
is better to be starved to death, de- 
graded and humiliated by the big time 
than to have an established standing 
on the small time; full salary and rec- 
ognition, proper billing and more ad- 
vertising than he has ever had before. 

The only difference is one show a 

day. It isn't always the actual work 

required for that extra show, but the 
false professional pride that places the 
"three-a-day" theatre beneath the actor 
who has played twice daily. 



The actor is an individual now. He 
must think and act for himself. There- 
is no actor's organization which can 
or will do anything for him. And the 

actor who does a little thinking for 
himself will make up his mind over 
the prospect of playing once eve?y 
three weeks at a. cut salary in a two- 
a-day house in preference to consecu- 
tive bookings with regular money 
every week in a three-a-day theatre. 

The United Booking Offices is try 
ing to fool the actor. Perhaps it is 
Few routes have been given to act- 
on the eastern big time. When they 
were handed out last summer, each 
carried a reason. The reason mostly 
was that the act listened to the man- 
agers' argument, and accepted a con- 
tract on the managers' term* .md 



conditions. The United is trying to 
"stall" along the great mass of acts 
without contracts by giving a week 
here and there — trying to hold them 
together, away from the small time. 

It can't be done unless the actors 
are willing. The small time is the 
refuge. The small time needs build- 
ing up. It's going to be the big time 
soon. The big time now is coming 

back to meet the small time. They 
will both be on an equal footing, prob- 
ably a fifty-cent admission fee, with 
most of the vaudeville houses in the 
east playing three shows daily. 

It might be expected the small time 
will eventually play the big time acts 
twice daily, with the smaller turns giv- 
ing the second or "supper show," but 
this is hardly practicable from the 
small time manager's point of view. 
He claims reserved seats cannot be 
sold, nor the house emptied at say 
seven p. m., and that the audience, in 
for the supper show, will remain over 
for the night performance, to see the 
feature turns if they have not previ- 
ously appeared. 



The small time manager wants to 

play the big time acts, but doesn't 

want to increase his admission price 

until obliged to. The small time 

shows won't stand much of an in- 
crease just now unless the scale is 
titled. This will keep the biggest 
turns without competition until a real 
big time circuit develops. The small 
time can handle acts of $1,000 or 
less, not in a great quantity, but in 
sufficient numbers to force the big 
time to do business like business 
people — when the small time shall 
have shown it can hurt the big time 
in its material. It cannot be expected 
the bigger vaudeville managers will be- 
lieve anything before that happens. 

The small time has a brighter out- 
look than it did at the opening of 
the season. The big time is going to 
do more for it than the big time did 

when it declared a "blacklist," which 
threw the very best acts into the small 
time division. Then the actors played 
the small time because they had no 
other place to go. Now they will play 
it because they are "sore," and want 
steady work. They cannot afford to 
wait upon the pleasure of the big time 
managers with his hundreds of ideas 
and as many favorites. 



Consecutive engagements, small cost 

of transportation between stands and 

billing are the small time inducements. 

The big time offers nothing but two 
shows daily, with long jumps and graft. 
The "big time" bugaboo, to the 
actor with common sense, is a "bunk," 
as against the small time. 



The big time is importing act* from 

the small time to keep the salary roll 

down, but the graft goes on just the 
same. It has been acknowledged the 
big managers would have to make 

m«»rr mnnr\ Inipi tin- !>;n k <>f tlir 



house, out of the actors. Bringing 
in small time turns, more cheap than 
meritorious in most instances, is as- 
serting itself in the big time vaude- 
ville programs, especially outside New 
York. These big time shows are los- 
ing patronage faster even than the 
New York houses. A bill of seven or 
eight acts with a couple of cheap turns 
with no class in their make-up has 
driven away the vaudeville regulars 
out of town. 



The inability to put a good, fast 

and clean show together on the salary 

limit has done the same thing to the 

former Percy Williams houses in New 

York. Perhaps the billing matter has 

had something to do with the present 

condition. There has been some pe- 
culiar billing around New York. That 
is one thing the vaudeville actor al- 
ways looks out for as his right, by 
reason of being in the show business. 
Acts on the small time must be prop- 
erly billed, to bring value to the the- 
atre. It won't make much difference 
there who the actor may know in "the 
office." He's got to be billed, and 
"cutting salary" won't be one of the 
considerations for feature programing. 



The big time actor is gaining free- 
dom from graft by taking to the small 
time. There is graft on the big time. 
Everyone who knows aught of vaude- 
ville knows that. We wonder if E. 
F. Albee and J. J. Murdock will sanc- 
tion the publication of the story that 
a $125-act playing the big time is "giv- 
ing up" $30 weekly of that salary, be- 
sides paying a gross commission of 
ten per cent., leaving the act $82.50 
net out of its $125. A little graft on 
a big salary perhaps can't be helped, 
but isn't that going it pretty strong? 
It's almost as bad as the old days in 
Chinese, when the country manager 
was prepared to be trimmed down- 
stairs before he went upstairs to be 
informed he would have to "declare 
in" a certain man for ten, twenty or 
a larger percentage of his profits. 

Wouldn't it be interesting to know 
who got that $30 weekly graft out 
of the $125-act. How could such a 
thing occur in a big booking office 
headed by B. F. Keith, a multi-mil- 
lionaire? Mr. Keith surely isn't aware 
of the measley little stealing that is 
going on. Perhaps Messrs. Albee and 
Murdock would like Variety to an- 
nounce who obtained the $30 graft. 
Would it surprise them to know? Or 
some other people very close to them 
in a business way who seem to be try- 
ing very much to have themselves pub- 
licly proclaimed as grafters. 



It is up to the actor to think of the 

small time more seriously. And let 

him be far better satisfied to secure 

full value for his work playing three 
shows a day all the while than to be 
ground under the heel of the big time, 
which plays him once in three weeks 
instead. No part of the reputation of 
"playing the two-a-day" can '•'• <lc- 
|Misjtp<! in a living* 1»-«nlf 



10 



VARIETY 



SHOW BUSINESS IN BAD WAY 
ACCORD ING TO A. H. WOODS 

Legitimate Manager Distrustful of One-Nighters. Qeo. M. 
Cohan's Future Time, Frazee on Lackaye. Waller's 
Contempt for New York. Kellerd's Tough Proposi- 
tion. New York Baseball Club $400,000 Ahead 
on Season-McQraw Broke. Harris 
Estate Productions. 



By LEANDER 

A. H. Woods thinks the show busi- 
ness is in very bad shape. This might 
seem to some readers a rather flip sum- 
ming up, but when you come to think 
of it, Mr. Woods ought to be a pretty 
good authority. He has twenty-six 
shows, all working, and some one of 
them so located as to make reports 
that should be highly instructive. The 
Woods enterprises, in fact, cover the 
country from California to Maine, and 
from the far South away up into the 
Dominion of Canada. 

"The one night stands business," 
said Mr. Woods yesterday, "is done 
for, excepting in the cases of extraor- 
dinary successes with long metropoli- 
tan runs behind them. I am inclined 10 
think that the amusement business in 
general is going to have a harder and 
harder time of it from now on. Of 
course everybody knows that there are 
too many theatres, not alone in New 
York, but everywhere else. The mov- 
ing picture business is becoming bigger 
and bigger, and is cutting in deeper 
and deeper. When I was in Chicago 
the other day, people kept telling me 
about the Wilson theatre, a moving 
picture and vaudeville house, built up- 
on an extravagant scale, and situated 
away out in the residential section a 
long distance from anywhere. I fin- 
ally became interested in it, realizing 
that it was exerting an influence that 
might be worth while looking into, and 
I went out to look the proposition 
over. "You never saw a greater crowd 
or a better crowd. The significant 
feature of it was that there were at 
least seventy automobiles bringing peo- 
ple to see the show. Now anything that 
draws the automobile class into the 
zone of cheap prices is worth more 
than a mere dismissal, and proves to 
my mind that cheap prices are cutting 
an enormous figure, and are going to 
be even more important an influence 
than they are at present. When a man 
can take his whole family and enter- 
tain them thoroughly upon what it 
would cost him to go to a first class 
theatre all by himself, he is bound to 
consider the fact and act upon it." 

For the $2 audiences we have got to 
provide bigger hits than formerly. Peo- 
ple won't pay the top price, unless they 
know beforehand just what they are 
going to get. They will jump inio 
their automobiles and go to the moving 
picture and vaudeville theatres, which 
are being made more and more luxur- 
ious to suit their tastes." 

I asked Mr. Woods how the country 
in general was panning out. He re- 
plied: 

"Eltinge, who is on the coast, is do- 
ing enormously. He went out by the 
northern route, and now is in Vancou- 



RIGHARDSON 

ver drawing capacity audiences. Far- 
num also is on the coast with 'The 
Littlest Rebel,' and having fine houses. 
For most of the other shows, the best 
I can say is that they are piking along, 
showing a profit. Here in New York 
'Within the Law* seems to be the real 
thing. We have an advance sale of 
more than $33,000, which demonstrates 
that the piece will stay for a long time 
to come. The other enterprises in 
which I am interested here are all right 
also. But the middle west and New 
England are in very bad shape gener- 
ally, and if I had any shows that pos- 
sessed nothing of the unusual in their 
demand upon public attention, I would 
call them in." 

Cohan St Harris Busy. 

There is no room to doubt that Geo. 
M. Cohan has made the biggest kind 
of a success with his "Broadway 
Jones." His theatre is a clear case f 
sell-out every night, and at the Satur- 
day matinees. The Wednesday after- 
noon performances do not quite keep 
up to this state of things, but that is 
to be expected. It seems a certainty 
that "Broadway Jones" will run all the 
season in New York. 

Next year Mr. Cohan will go to Chi- 
cago with this piece and perhaps fill 
out the winter in Boston. The subse- 
quent season he will play the other big 
cities, following with a comprehensive 
tour of the country, and probably go- 
ing on to California for the late spring 
and summer. I should think it would 
he pretty comfortable in a calling so 
uncertain, to be able to lay out a fixed 
plan of life for three years in advance, 
with more than a mere likelihood of 
steady profit. 

The Cohan & Harris side lines are 
doing pretty well, too. Raymond 
Hitchcock opened at the Grand Opera 
House, Chicago, Sunday night, to 
$1,900, which is some $200 above the 
previously known capacity of the 
house. The Monday evening's receipts 
were right around $1,500, and it looks 
to be a sure thing that the engagement 
will last for ten wfreks or longer to 
very large business. The western "Of- 
ficer 666" is in Los Angeles getting the 
money, although the critics are giving 
up the old indignant yelp about not 
having the original cast. 

They have not emerged, out that 
way, from the antique and fallacious 
idea that the actor who plays a role 
first cannot be replaced. If I had the 
time to stop and argue the point, I 
would ask these gentlemen of the qui!l 
if there was anything about the pro- 
fession of acting which made it so dif- 
ferent from other pursuits, that any- 
body engaged in it could not have a 



satisfactory substitute. But what is the 
use? 

Cohan & Harris meanwhile are keep- 
ing themselves busy all around the 
place. Presently they will start all 
over again with Carlyle Moore's play, 
called "Stop Thief," which they pro- 
duced in the late summer at Atlanti: 
City, and took off for repairs. These 
now have been completed, and the man- 
agers are confident that the piece is in 
first rate condition. The same report 
is made on the Douglas Fairbanks 
play, "Hawthorne, U. S. A.," written 
by James Eagan and doctored by Win- 
chell Smith before that adroit theatrical 
manipulator sailed for Europe the other 
day. 

"Hawthorne," in its original state, 
was a good property until the last act, 
where it weakened. It is believed that 
Mr. Smith has supplied the necessary 
remedy, and we shall find out within 
the next very few weeks. Mr. Sm.h 
has gone to London for the production 
of "Officer 666," in which Wallace Ed- 
dinger and John Milturn are to have 
the two principal characters. Eddinger 
is in London now, and Milturn, \vl: > 
was in the Chicago cast, sailed with 
Mr. Smith. 

An entire production, even to the 
paintings used in this comedy, is to be 
sent across the water Saturday. It is 
to be an exact duplicate of the mis- 
en-scene made use of at the Gaiety 
theatre here. George Nash, whose 
play, "The Other Man," did not quite 
fill the bill, is back in the cast, and 
Edward Abeles, as already announced, 
will fill out the remainder of the New 
York run of "Officer 666" in the char- 
acter originated by Eddinger. 

Mr. Frazee's Plans. 

H. H. Frazee expects that his new 
amusement edifice, the Longacre the- 
atre, will be ready for the public 
Thanksgiving week. 

"I think," he said (with the accent 
on the "think") "we will get there at 
the time mentioned, but if we don't, I 
shall not care if we do not open until 
Christmas, for the period between the 
two holidays is a lean stretch, and 
might mean a handicap to a new the- 
atre. I expect we will open with 'Fine- 
Feathers,' but not if it holds up at its 
present gait in Chicago, where the 
business is going along at the rate of 
between $8,000 and $9,000 a week. 

"I had intended to put 'Bachelors 
and Benedicts' into Chicago, but prob- 
ably will have to find another place for 
it. The piece went into rehearsal yes- 
terday, with an excellent cast, contain- 
ing Ralph Herz, Harry Williams, Edna 
Baker and Grace Goodall. You know 
all these people and will recall Miss 
Goodall as the girl who made the big 
hit in the part of the waitress in 'Get 
Rich Quick Wallingford.'" 

I inquired if Wilton Lackaye would 
be in the cast of "Fine Feathers" for 
the New York opening. 

"He may and he may not," respond- 
ed Mr. Frazee. "If he does, it will be 
upon my terms, and not his. When he 
left the company I put Frank Sheridan 
in his place, and the change made no 
difference at all in the receipts. Sheri- 
dan gets $250 a week, and Lackaye 
$600, so I am not particularly worried 
as to whether Lackaye comes back or 
stays wheje he is." 



Waller's Costly Lesson. 

It seems altogether likely that Lewis 
Waller will get an expensive but much 
needed lesson at Daly's theatre by the 
time he finishes the present engagement 
there with "Henry V." It is apparent 
from the character of this revival that 
Mr. Waller looked upon the New York 
public as a soft mark, against which he 
could project any old kind of a pro- 
duction and "get away with it." 

Indeed, he was let down a great deal 
more easily than .any American man- 
ager would have been in presenting 
such a slovenly, slipshod and gro- 
tesquely inadequate revival. This is 
one advantage of being a foreigner, re- 
ceiving the courtesy we inherently ex- 
tend to persons from across the sea. 

If any of our own producers had 
handed us such an atrocious piece of 
stage direction and scenic equipment as 
Mr. Waller's "Henry V," the theatre 
would have been empty before the end 
of the second act, and the newspapers 
would have ripped him open from end 
to end. The scenery and costumes are 
shabby beyond description, the com- 
pany, with the exception of Mr. Waller 
himself and Madge Titheradge, would 
have brought a smile of derision to the 
countenance of the late James Owen 
O'Connor, and the unshaven, bedrag- 
gled and chuckle-headed supers would 
have produced roars of mirth from a 
backwoods audience. 

It took a colossal nerve on the part 
of this Englishman to set such a rep- 
resentation as this before the New York 
public, which he must have regarded 
with utter contempt. In England when 
the people feel that a manager is tak- 
ing liberties with them, they blurt out 
their resentment in hisses, hoots and 
cat calls. In America they merely stay 
away, and this, I am very pleased to 
say, is what they are doing at the pres- 
ent moment in the instance of the im- 
pudent Mr. Waller. 

Ames Opens Season. 

The semi-public rehearsal idea seems 
to be taking a very firm hold in this 
Community, and quite possibly will be- 
come as much of a fixture as it is in 
Paris. It has been pretty well tried 
out by the Shuberts, who have made 
two of their season's productions on 
Sunday nights to invited audiences. 

Winthrop Ames now comes along 
with a Saturday evening invitation per- 
formance of "The Affairs of Anatole," 
to which the general public will not be 
admitted. The critics who have re- 
ceived tickets for this occasion are re- 
quested to publish nothing until Tues- 
day morning, and of course will respect 
the wishes of the management. 

It readily will be perceived that the 
plan has its distinct advantages from 
several points of view. In the first 
place, it enables the exclusion of "the 
death watch," which is growing more 
and more difficult to please, and becom- 
ing a greater and greater damper. 
Secondly, it gives the critics ample time 
in which to reach a sober judgment 
and put it in the best chosen of lan- 
guage. The gentlemen who write our 
first night notices have had to do their 
work hastily and without the ripeness 
of consideration they would have liked 
to bestow upon it. They know as well 
as anybody that mental digestion re- 
quires time, the same as any other 
human process, and if the new scheme 
becomes general, they will hail it earn- 



VARIETY 



11 



estly. If it produces no other result, 
it will have the effect of enabling a 
critic to be a critic in the true sense, 
and not a mere reporter of hasty im- 
pressions. 
Kellerd't Tough Game. 

John Kellerd, who is an exception- 
ally good actor, with a particularly 
serious purpose in life, has bitten off a 
very large mouthful in taking a .lease 
of the Garden theatre and proposing 
to produce Shakespeare plays upon its 
stage. 

As a business proposition, the Gar- 
den is rough sledding. Many of our 
managers have taken whacks at it in 
turn, and all with the same result. 
There have been successes at the Gar- 
den, but they were few and far be- 
tween, and would have been vastly 
greater elsewhere. 

Men like A. M. Palmer, Charles 
Frohman, 1. Henry French, Henry W. 
Savage, and so on, have thought they 
could see a way to make this proposi- 
tion pay, but have retired from the job 
one after the other in unvarying rou 
tine. Ed Rice made a hit at the Gar- 
den with "1492"; "Trilby" began its re- 
markable career in this establishment; 
Mansfield played a big engagement 
here, and so did K. H. Sothern. But, 
take it all in all, the record is one of 
disaster. 

I do not like to disturb Mr. Kellard's 
optimism, and still less to occupy the 
attitude of damning his undertaking in 
advance. At the same time I cannot 
refrain from expressing regret that he 
should choose the Garden theatre as a 
showcase for a line of goods that is 
hard to sell under the most favorable 
conditions. 

Anna Eva Fa? Again. 

The original Anna Eva Fay, who has 
enjoyed a long and extraordinary 
vogue as an exponent of what we used 
to call second sight, is coming back 10 
the stage. Anna Eva has remained in 
retirement for years, and makes her 
return principally to show that she is 
the real and original article, and that 
the other second sight Fays have been 
base imitators. 

According to the story that goes 
with the reappearance, Mrs. Fay had a 
son, who married his mother's com- 
panion, and made a second sight star of 
her, with large financial returns, but 
so much to the disturbance of his own 
equanimity that he ultimately was 
moved to take his own life. 

The mother never has appeared in 
New York, but will do so during the 
coming month. She played for three 
years consecutively at the Queen's Hall 
in London, which certainly was some- 
thing of an achievement. It will be in- 
teresting to note whether the gifts 
which made her a world sensation long 
ago still are potential or not. 
The Baseball Madness. 

The whole country seems to have 
gone stark, staring mad on the matter 
of baseball. One man whom I ran 
across the other afternoon came all the 
way from Yuma. Arizona, to witness 
the world's championship series, and 
lias paid an average of $15 a day for 
his ticket of admission, not to mention 
other expenses, such as railway trans- 
portation, hotel bills and the "shade'' 
which goes with the process of trying 
to pick the winner. 

It was estimated that there were 



forty thousand people at the first game 
in New York, and as the prices ranged 
from $1 to $5, it is not particularly dif- 
ficult to. arrive at the conclusion that 
some money was involved. It is very 
fortunate for the national game thit 
last year's ticket scandal was not re- 
peated this time. The speculators made 
big money, to be sure, but they did not 
get all the seats, as they did upon the 
previous occasion. 

I hear it upon what appears to be 
the very best of authority that the New 
York Baseball Club will have a profit 
for the current year of more than $400.- 
000. The most illuminative collateral 
fact about this is that John McGraw, 
who, more than any other individual, 
made this possible, is "broke." McGraw 
gets all that is coming to him, but he 
will bet. 
Harris Estate Plans. 

The Henry B. Harris Estate will cut 
a quite important figure in the amuse- 
ment world this year, although opera- 
tions have been 'trimmed off somewhat 
with the idea of eliminating possible 
losses. The principal new productions 
from the Harris offices will be "The 
Yellow Jacket," a Chinese play, "Com- 
ing Home to Roost," a comedy drama, 
and "The Trial Marriage," in which 
Helen Ware is about to begin her star- 
ring tour. 

The play last named is said to be 
especially promising. It is being re- 
hearsed by Edward Eisner, who this 
year is operating as a free lance in 
stage direction. 

The other Harris enterprises are the 
tours of Rose Stahl, "The Country 
Boy," "The Traveling Salesman," "The 
Quaker Girl," and "My Best Girl," 
with Clifton Crawford as its star. 
Frank McKee is interested in the Craw- 
ford undertaking and in "The Quaker 
Girl." Edgar Selwyn and William Har- 
ris, Jr., are concerned in some of the 
other affairs, all of which are in an en- 
tirely healthy condition. 
"Old Kentucky" Winning. 

The tour of "In Old Kentucky" has 
started off most prosperously. A. W. 
Dingwall, who directs the fortunes of 
this attraction, started it out toward 
the coast through Canadian territory, 
where there is a raft of money for the- 
atrical entertainments of established 
worth. 

The play now is working down 
through the principal cities of the Pa- 
cific slope, and doing remarkably well. 
This comedy-drama and "Way Down 
East" may be looked to for steady 
profits year after year. Neither grows 
old with the passage of time, which is 
a remarkable circumstance when you 
come to reflect upon the fleeting qual- 
ity of show business in general. 
Some Random Notes. 

The appointment of Clarence Hyde 
as general press representative for 
Klaw & Erlanger could not possibly 
have been improved upon. Mr. Hyde 
is popular, efficient and serious, and 
does not regard his business as a joke. 



Charles B. Dillingham and Bruce 
Edwards have been in Philadelphia all 
week for the opening performances <>f 
"The Lady of the Slipper." in which 
Montgomery and Stone and Elsie Janis 
are the principal features. The reports 
that have come in emphatically stamp 
the new piece as a great money hit. 



William A. Brady returns to New 
York to-day after two weeks at French 
Lick Springs, Ind. After the first night 
of "Little Women," scheduled for Mon- 
day at the Playhouse, he will turn his 
attention to the Drury Lane produc- 
tion, "The Whip," in which he is inter- 
ested with the Messrs. S Hubert and 
Comstock & Gest. 

Walter Lawrence, who has made a 
fine personal hit in "The Woman Hat- 
ers," at the Astor theatre, may go star- 
ring next season in a new Irish play. 
The piece in view is not of the regula- 
tion sort, but gives us an Irish gentle- 
man for a hero. Richardson. 



BUYS A WYATT THEATRE. 

Redlands, Cal., Oct. 9. 

The Wyatt theatre, a link in the 
chain of W. T. Wyatt of Los Angeles, 
has been sold to John Deiting, a San 
Francisco theatrical man. The latter 
plans to operate the house following 
the expiration of the Wyatt lease. 

Sixty thousand dollars is named as 
the consideration. 



JOE HOWARD'S NEW ONE. 

Joe Howard, with Elizabeth Mur- 
ray in his support, is scheduled to open 
in Indianapolis Dec. 16 in "Frivolous 
Geraldine." Meanwhile Howard is 
playing a list of one-nightcrs in "The 
Goddess of Liberty." 

Howard was playing vaudeville on 
the Orpheum Circuit in the far west 
when a dispute over billing brought 
his tour to an abrupt end. 



0*MALLEY'S DUEL IDEA. 

The brilliant and witty newspaper 
writer, Frank O'Malley, of the Niew 
York Sun, said a few things in his 
paper appertainhV to one Pierre Loti, 
an author on the other side, and recog- 
nized as such over here. M. Loti 
dipped his scathing pen in a fresh pot 
of ink, and is reported to have informed 
Mr. O'Malley by mail it looked like a 
duel. 

The Sun man won't admit he ever 
read one of Loti's works, but he called 
up his challenger on the phone. Say- 
ing over the wire he thought that the 
quickest way to get action, Mr. O'Mal- 
ley asked Mr. Loti if, according to the 
code, as he had noticed it in burlesque 
shows, wasn't the challenged party en- 
titled to choice of location, first bid for 
weapons, with the loser to pay for the 
drinks if the air should turn out chilly 
at 4 a. m. Loti affirmed all O'Malley 
asked. 

Requesting the trouble seeker to glue 
his ear to the transmitter, so he 
wouldn't have to repeat instructions, 
O'Malley told Loti he would name the 
duel weapons and place of activity as 
typewriters at Jack's any morning the 
coffee was hot. Then M. Loti ordered 
the telephone company to change his 
number. 



REAL MAKE BELIEVE SHOW. 

"Molly Make Believe" is no realty as 
far as any stage production is con- 
cerned at present. 

William Stoermer had planned to 
take the show out. After selecting a 
company, he announced an opening. 
Subsequent changes in cast caused 
delay, and the opening date was can- 
celled several times. 

Stoermer, after six weeks' rehears- 
als, called the show off. Violet Dale, 
who was to have been featured, is 
now looking for another job. 



NATIONAL FOR MELLEHS. 

San Francisco, Oct. 9. 

This week saw the opening of the 
National, which will be devoted to 
melodrama. Charles Goldberg is man- 
ager. The first production was Paul 
M. Potter's "The Conquerors." 

The company numbers over forty 
persons, including Adeline Fildes. 
Ethel Martelle, Dorothy Davis Allen, 
Eva Lewis, May Ludford, Jack Con- 
way, Norman R. Fusier, Max Steinle, 
Frank A. Bonner, Joseph Fogarty, 
Emmett Sheridan. Charles Baxter, 
David Butler, Harry McLennan. 



WALNUT ST. COMPROMISE. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 

A compromise has been effected in 
the suit brought by the estate of Henry 
B. Harris in Common Pleas Court here 
asking that a receiver be appointed for 
the company operating the Walnut 
Street theatre. The adjustment was 
private. 

Frank Howe. Jr., will remain as 
manager, representing the lessees. 
"Louisiana Lou" opens here next Mon- 
day. 



COLONIAL'S OLD FAVORITES. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
"A Winsome Widow" will close its 
Chicago engagement at the Colonial 
Oct. 26. Oct. 28 Christie MacDonald 
will arrive in "The Spring Maid" and 
following that engagement "Ben Hur" 
will be brought in for a month. 



EDNA BAKER LEADING. 

Edna Baker has been engaged by H. 
H. Frazee as the leading woman role 
in "Bachelors and Benedicts," a com- 
edy by Jackson D. Haag, in which 
Ralph Herz will be featured. 

Miss Baker was seen here in "The 
Penalty," given for a special matinee 
at the Gaiety last season. 



HOFFMANN'S SHOW DELAYED. 

Boston, Oct. 9. 

The Gertrude Hoffmann show will 
not open at the Shubert until to- 
morrow night, having been postponed 
from Monday, following the premiere 
last Saturday at Albany. 

A few minor principals have been 
replaced. Rehearsals are being held 
for the Boston showing. 



MAKING MONEY WHILE ILL. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 9. 
While Nat C. Goodwin has been 
confined to his home recovering from 
his recent accident, the comedian has 
cleared $47,500 in real estate opera- 
tions. 

Mr. Goodwin is in a very jovial 
frame of mind. He will he about in 
four or five weeks. 



I'LAY FOR RICHARD BENNETT. 

Fred Landis of Logansport, Ind., 
has written a new play which Liebler 
& Co. have accepted for production. 
It will feature Richard Bennett. The 
Lieblers have loaned Bennett t<» Hen 
ry W. Savage for f< nr weeh. accord- 
ing to report, at which time t;.,. THW 
Landis piece will i.e ready ' i nhear- 
sal. 



12 



VARIETY 



JOHN CORT STILL BUILDING; 

HAS E AST SID E LOCATION 

Secures Site at 3rd Avenue and 64th Street for "Combin- 
ation" House, Playing Attractions Fron His 
Proposed Bronx Theatre. Several 
Eastern Cort Houses. 



John Cort has completed arrange- 
ments for the erection of a new thea- 
tre at 64th street and Third avenue, to 
be conducted along the lines of the 
Grand Opera House. 

The new house is to have a seating 
capacity of 2,200. Von Bernon & La- 
vell, 507 Fifth avenue, are the archi- 
tects, and the Libman Contracting Co 
the builders. 

The building will cost $225,000 and 
the ground $175,000, making a total 
investment of $400,000, without inte- 
rior decorations and fittings. 

Morris Runkel, real estate broker, 
was instrumental in financing the 
proposition. The house will not be 
completed before next August. 

Mr. Cort is extending his eastern 
theatre holdings to an extent that will 
in a short time make him a factor in 
this section of the country. These, 
added to his large circuit in the west, 
will place him in a position to produce 
and develop a large number of his own 
production enterprises and make him 
independent of all circuit alliances and 
affiliations. 

Ground has just been broken for his 
new house at Park Square, Boston. In 
conjunction with Frank Gersten he is 
erecting the new Prospect theatre, 
Bronx. The Cort theatre on West 48th 
street is expected to be ready for open- 
ing Jan. 1. Besides, is the Cort, Chi- 
cago, which has been fortunate in 
holding profitable successes. 



"NEW SIN" MOVING ON. 

Chicago, Oct. 9 
Powers' will be dark after Saturday. 

"The New Sin" has not drawn well 

and will be taken to New York. 
The next attraction Oct. 28 will be 

Mrs. Fiske in "The High Road," by 

Edward Sheldon. 

"The New Sin" will open at Wal- 
laces, New York, Oct. 15. 



AGENTS' ASS'N MEETING. 

The Dramatic and Musical Agents' 
Association plans to hold an important 
meeting next month at which time the 
date for the annual election of offic- 
ers will be set and various matters 
demanding immediate attention will be 
discussed. 

There is a movement on foot among 
the members to take the Chicago musi- 
cal and dramatic agents into member- 
ship. 

The New York headquarters of the 
association are in the Knickerbocker 
Building, where Secretary H. K. Betts 
has the books. 



"MILITARY GIRL" IN NEW YORK? 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

It is reported "The Military Girl" 
will open the new 44th Street theatre 
in New York for the Shuberts. 

The show is now at the American 



here, with Cecil Lean and Florence 
Holbrook. 

Ned Wayburn will come to Chicago 
shortly to arrange a burlesque on 
"Kismet" which will be added to the 
entertainment. 



GARRICK'S NEW SHOW. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

"Look Who's Here" will be the title 
of "The Miner and the Daughter" 
(musical version of "Next") opening 
at the Garrick Oct. 21. The Shuberts 
new piece takes the place of "Egypt" 
with Margaret Anglin, which has held 
the Garrick stage for two weeks. Miss 
Anglin, however, will hold over an- 
other week in "Green Stockings," 
afterward going on the road in it. 

It is a farce, by Rida Johnson 
Young and Jerome D. Kern. Among 
those in it are Helen Lowell, Gertrude 
Millington, Grace Field, Maude Ken- 
nedy, James B. Carson, Joseph Phil- 
lips, William Pniett, Donald MacDon- 
ald, Wallace Owen, W. L. Romaine. 

Margaret Anglin in "Egypt," the 
drama by Edward Sheldon, now at the 
Garrick, will be withdrawn Saturday 
night. Miss Anglin has decided to 
revive "Green Stockings" for a tour 
of the southwest. 

After playing Kansas City, Miss An- 
glin and "Green Stockings" will strike 
for the south, where they have been 
placed for the one night stands. 



FOR Mc\ ICKER'S IN MARCH. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
Rowland & Clifford plan to produce 
during March a play by Howard Hall 
called "The Stronger Magnet." It 
will be offered at McVicker's theatre. 



"BRIGHTON GIRL" ON ROAD. 

"The Girl From Brighton" at the 
Academy of Music will depart in about 
four more weeks, probably on a road 
tour. Both the Klaw & Erlanger and 
Shuberts booking agencies have had 
representatives at the Academy looking 
the piece over, preliminary to arranging 
with Mr. Fox for the booking. The 
Academy's manager has given no de- 
cision as yet. 

In about two weeks more Jack Ma- 
son, the producer for the Academy will 
be called upon to open rehearsals for 
the new production to follow "The 
Girl." 



WORKMAN SELLS OUT. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 9. 
Elmer N. Workman has sold out his 
interest in the Adolphus theatre. The 
purchaser's identity was not disclosed, 
but rumor has it that Robert L. Fargo, 
the present manager, and Joseph 
Sturm have combined to carry on the 
enterprise. 



♦TOMMY" DREW $4,000. 

Notwithstanding the severe panning 
"Tantalizing Tommy" received when 
opening at the Criterion last week, the 
receipts for the five performances from 
Wednesday to Saturday night are said 
to have been $4,000. The box office 
returns were accepted by the manage- 
ment in preference to the "notices" 
in the dailies. 

Rather light business has greeted 
"The Charity Girl," another produc- 
tion which had its Broadway sight 
the same evening as "Tommy." In- 
terested in "The Charity Girl" are 
Charles B. Dillingham, W. F. Connor, 
Bert C. Whitney and Geo. W. Leder- 
er. The show was rushed in the 
Globe, to fill in the breach until the 
Montgomery and Stone-Elsie Janis 
show gets in there. It is due in about 
two more weeks. 

Another of New York's slow goers 
is "A Scrape o' the Pen," at Weber's. 
While favorable opinion of the 
Scotch piece is heard on all sides, the 
house on lower Broadway doesn't 
seem able to start the crowd. It is 
doing around $600 a performance. 
Wednesday W. R. Sill had a "Scotch 
night." The Graham Moffatt play is 
in Weber's for eight weeks, rain or 
shine. 



CHICAGO BUSINESS SPURTS. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

Business took little spurts for the 
better this week in spots. "The Girl 
from Montmartre" at the Chicago, did 
$1,600 Saturday night and slightly over 
$900 on the matinee. Margaret Anglin 
had only $32 advance sale Sunday after- 
noon for Monday night. 

"Milestones" at the Blackstone has 
been experiencing a boom. The Sun- 
day business at the American Music 
Hall was the best of the season, so far. 

"Fine Feathers" sold out Sunday 
night. "A Winsome Widow" has been 
gaining and "The Garden of Allah" has 
only been falling away a little. "Kis- 
met" at the Illinois is still a magnet. 
"The Red Widow" is doing good busi- 
ness. Other houses are doing medium 
to mediocre business. 



INVITED IN GABY' DESLYS SHOW. 

The Shuberts have invited Barney 
Bernard and Lee Harrison to take part 
in "Vera Violetta" which Gaby Deslys 
is to head. It is due at the Shubert, 
Boston, Oct. 28, for the. first big city 
date, following in the Gertrude Hoff- 
mann Revue. 

While pondering over the offer, Mr. 
Harrison may essay a short turn in 
the vaudevilles, with Adele Rowland. 
Vincent Bryan and Harry Williams 
have prepared a skit in "one" for them, 
called "Pier 22." 



MOROSCO'S PLANS. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 9. 

Oliver Morosco, who returned from 
New York Saturday, has announced 
the project of making a joint produc- 
tion with the Shuberts, of "The Man 
With Three Wives" in New York. If 
the venture is successful, this may be 
followed by 'Gauntlet's Pride" and 
"The Money Moon," produced, this 
week at the Belasco. 

Morosco announced that his new 
Los Angeles house would open Dec. 1. 



NEXT GARDEN HOW. 

The talk is centering on the next 
show to appear at the Winter Garden, 
New York. "The Passing Show," now 
there, is not showing any signs of a 
continued healthy run. It is said the 
present Winter Garden production will 
make money for the management if 
drawing in $12,000 weekly, not inclu- 
sive of the Sunday show. That aver- 
ages around $2,700. 

Last week "The Passing Show" : s 
reported to have missed $17,000 by a 
couple of hundred dollars. This took 
in the receipts Sunday, making the net 
for the production about $14,000. 

Lew Fields is reported to have re- 
ceived a proposition from the Shuberts 
to place "The Sun Dodgers" (now 
preparing) at the Winter Garden, but 
Fields is building the show for the 
Broadway. The Gertrude Hoffmann 
production playing in Boston this 
week is a contender for the Winter 
Garden stage if "The Passing Show" 
vacates. 



JACKSON CO/8 SECOND CLOSING. 

"My Wife's Family," promoted by 
the Jackson Amusement Co., failed to 
get the money on the one-nighters and 
closed shop at Scranton, Saturday 
night. This is the second production 
of the Jackson firm to close the same 
week, its "Parisian Model" being the 
other. 



COLLIER SHOW OPENING. 

William Collier in his new show 
opens tonight (Friday) at Ithaca, N. V. 



"MME. X" CAN DRAW. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 
"Madame X" is still a drawing card. 
At the Grand Opera House last week, 
playing to popular prices and during 
warm weather, the piece, with Eugenie 
Blair, did $7,000. The Saturday re- 
ceipts, two shows, were $2,240. 



SONGS FOR "SUN DODGERS." 

Jerome & Schwartz were commis- 
sioned Tuesday to write some new 
songs for Lew Fields "The Sun Dod- 
gers." 



SLAVIN IN SINGER SHOW. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
John Slavin will be in "The Widow's 
Honeymoon," the new Mort H. Singer 
musical show opening in Chicago 
about Nov. 1. 



IN FRISCO'S SAVOY. 

San Francisco, Oct. 9. 
Kolb and Dill will not open Grau- 
man's new Market Street theatre. 
Charles Muehlman, manager of the 
Savoy, has cancelled the contracts for 
dollar combinations booked there, ex- 
cepting "Old Kentucky," and has 
signed an indefinite contract with the 
German comedians. He will go to 
New York and look for new vehicles 
for them. 

They have in preparation a new 
piece by Aaron Hoffman, and also plan 
a revival of "Lonesome Town." Their 
contract under Oliver Moroscos ma- 
agement expires Oct. 13. They will 
thereafter manage themselves. 



VARIETY 



13 



"SHOW GIRLS'* AT $50 WEEKLY: 
BETTER PA ID THA N ACTRESSES 

"All for the Ladies" Engages Sixteen at the Top Figure. 

Appear in One Act Only, Wearing $300 Dresses. 

Macy's Department Store Adopts a Stage 

Idea to Display Gowns 



Face and form seem likely to be 
more highly valued upon the stage 
ere long than histrionism. This week 
the market rate in "show girls' sal- 
ary" reached the top notch. For the 
Sam Bernard show, "All for the La- 
dies" (in rehearsal), sixteen young 
women jwere engaged as "models." 
Most of them will receive $50 a week. 
Their stage duties will be principally 
parading across the stage during the 
second act, while wearing gowns that 
cost the management around $300 each. 
The scene is laid in the establishment 
of a Parisian modiste. The "show 
girls" will wear three gowns apiece. 

Show girls at $35 and $40 weekly 
have been of the common variety dur- 
ing past seasons in "dressy" produc- 
tions. The sudden jump in earning 
capacity for the Bernard show was 
caused through a desire to obtain an 
exclusive collection of young women, 
with faces not familiar to the Broad- 
way clientele, and forms that can car- 
ry the ultra-fashionable mode in 
"clothes." 

Macy's, in displaying their latest cre- 
ations in women's gowns, has adopted 
the stage idea. During the past two 
weeks there has been a Cabaret en- 
tertainment in the restaurant of the 
department store, between 2.30 and 
4. "Perfect 36's" wearing the best the 
store affords parade up and down be- 
fore the shoppers at lunch. 

"All for the Ladies" will start out 
about Election time, playing Buffalo 
and Toronto before having its Metro- 
politan debut at the Lyric, New York. 
The Shuberts and A. H. Woods are 
jointly interested in the production. 



MANAGER VERSUS AUTHOR. 

Richard Warner, sketch writer, pro- 
ducer and embryo playwright, says he 
read a three-act piece to a well-known 
manager the other day and that in 
the middle of the second act the vic- 
tim cried: "I never knew a man could 
write such a bad play!" 



-JUNE BRIDE" CLOSING. 

Pittsburgh, Oct. 9. 

This week will see the ending of 
Lew Fields' "June Bride." The show 
opened here Monday, after two weeks 
in Boston. 

"The June Bride" will be reorgan- 
ized and sent out once more. It is 
said mis-casting spoiled its chances. 



FRANCES STARR'S AMBITION. 

If within the next year or two it 
is announced Frances Starr will be 
seen in an elaborate production of 
"Romeo and Juliet," with the little 
woman in the most coveted role ever 
written for a star with a "dramatic- 
ingenue" personality, do not put it 
down to a sudden whim on the part 
of David Belasco. 

For ever so long Miss Starr has 



been making a careful study of the 
role of Juliet and has become so ob- 
sessed with the thought it is her only 
genuine ambition. 

In Miss Starr's boudoir is hung a 
life-sized painting of Mary Anderson 
in the character. 



BORDONI AT GARDEN. 

An importation for the Winter 
Garden, New York, is Irene Bordoni, a 
Frenchwoman, arriving this week. 

A turn will be 'put on, probably by 
Emil Agoust, the ballet master. Bor- 
dini will debut about Nov. 4, in the 
centre of the production playing there. 



"THE GYPSY" AT CLEVELAND. 

John Cort will give the first per- 
formance of "The Gypsy," the new 
Pixley and Luders' operetta at the 
Colonial, Cleveland, Oct. 21. A New 
York showing will be made early in 
November. 

In the company will be Violet Eaton, 
Eleanor Kent, Mabel Phillis Irving, 
Josephine Morse, Ernest Lambart, 
Jack Hazzard, Joseph Miron, Roland 
Hamilton Earle, Forrest Winant, 
Francis Lieb. 



"RED WIDOW'S" BIG START. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

Raymond Hitchcock opened Sunday 
night at Cohan's Grand Opera House 
in "The Red Widow" to a big and de- 
lighted audience. The piece went with 
much spirit and vim. Flora Zabellc 
shared the honors with her husband. 

Indications are that the piece will 
have a long run. 



"LOVE WAGER" BOOKED SOUTH. 

Cincinnati, Oct. 9. 

Following the engagement of Fritzi 
Scheff in "The Love Wager" at the 
Grand this week, the show will go to 
Indianapolis and Louisville for three 
days in each town, then making St. 
Louis for a week, after that taking up 
a southern trip Jos. M. Gaites laid out 
for his production this week in New 
York. 

Miss Scheff, according to report, is 
under a contract that guarantees her 
$1,200 weekly, with a percentage of the 
profits. 



"EASY" — IF IT COMES. 

"Easy Money," the Morrison-Brew- 
ster production, with only six people 
in the cast, was billed to open at the 
Baker, Rochester, last night (Oct. 10). 



NEW WEBER "POP" SHOWS. 

"A Parisian Model," which the Jack- 
son Amusement Co. secured for a whirl 
at the Weber circuit, withdrew quietly 
Saturday night at the Jacobs' (former 
ly Columbia), Newark. 

"A Man's Honor," put on the Weber 
time by Billy Sill and Bobby Harris 
as a stop-gap two or three weeks ago, 
will be withdrawn from the circuit 
Saturday night at Cleveland, unless 
the business for the week surprises 
the show's owners. 

"The Fatal Wedding," which Dave 
Marion is reviving for a trip over the 
Weber circuit, opens next Monday at 
the Grand, Brooklyn, filling in the 
week originally booked for "A Pari- 
sian Model," the Marie Beaugarde 
show, which gave up in Newark Sat- 
urday night. The Marion piece will 
be headed by Charles J. Haines and 
Gcraldinc Russell. Sam Dessauer is 
manager. 

"The Melting Pot," under the Mit- 
tenthal Bros.' management, is winding 
up a short tour of the Weber Circuit 
at the Grand, Brooklyn, " tomorrow 
night. In withdrawing this show and 
"The Prosecutor," the owners claim 
the patrons of the Co-Operative Cir- 
cuit care not for the highbrowed pieces. 

The Blaney-Spooner Amusement Co. 
says its "One Day" show did $3,500 on 
its stay at the Grand, Brooklyn, last 
week. This show has drawn them in 
ever since opening. 

The Joseph Byron Totten show, 
"The Red Head," withdrew from the 
Weber circuit last Saturday night at 
St. Louis. In its place will be "A 
Woman In the Case," backed by 
Messrs. Chase and Weber. 



FOX OUT; DEAGON IN. 

Harry Fox is out of "The Passing 
Show" at the Winter Garden. The 
Shuberts wanted him to appear on 
Sunday. He refused. 

Arthur Deagon has been engaged to 
join the show opening Oct. 28, under 
a ten weeks' contract. 



PREPARING "THE FOX." 

Oliver Morosco, who returned to the 
Pacific Coast to attend an opening of 
one of his new productions there, will 
come back to New York next week to 
make arrangements for the New York- 
presentation of "The Fox." 

He has engaged principals, and re- 
hearsals will start the minute Moros- 
co locates a theatre for the piece. 
There is some likelihood "The Fox" 
will follow "The Brute" into the 39th 
Street. 



"MONEY MOON" A SUCCESS. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 9. 

"The Money Moon," Hartley Man- 
ners' new work, was well received on 
its initial performance at the Belasco. 

The principal roles were admirably 
handled by Orrin Johnson, Margaret 
Leslie, Thomas McLarnie, Howard 
Scott and Emily Melville and Zymour 
Hastings. Gertrude Short, a child ac- 
tress, shared with the principals in the 
honors. 



"MODERN EVE'S" RUN ENDING. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

"A Modern Eve," which has passed 
its 200th performance in Chicago, will 
close at the Princess in two weeks, 
playing two or three weeks on the 
road, on its way to Boston and Phila- 
delphia. Practically the same 'cast 
now in the production will be seen on 
the road. 

The Princess will in all probability 
be renamed the William A. Brady 
Playhouse when Mr. Brady brings 
"Bought and Paid For" to that house 
in about a fortnight. 

William Norris. who created the role 
of the hen-pecked husband in "A Mod- 
ern Eve," and has played in the role 
for twenty-five weeks, will retire from 
the cast early next month. His part 
will be taken by Frank Deshon. Wil- 
liam Kent will replace Bertram Gras- 
by, and Edward Stahl will replace Phil 
Riley. It is rumored that Harriet Stan- 
ton, formerly prima donna of the mu- 
sical comedy, who retired precipitately 
from the cast, is about to be married. 



BOSTON SITE SOUGHT BY WOODS. 

Boston, Oct. 9. 

A. H. Woods is reported to be look- 
ing after a site for a theatre in this 
overcrowded theatrical city. 

The New York manager has scouts 
out in the downtown district. 



"THE FIGHT" VEILLER'S LATEST 

"The Fight" is the title of the new 
Bayard Veiller show which will be 
produced by Jos. M. Gaites. It is said 
to be of a melodramatic hue. The 
premiere is expected after election. 



GOING AFTER "DANCER." 

"The Dancer of Cairo" is being set 
in motion once again by A. II. Woods, 
according to the latest, which says 
Harry von Tilzer and Billy Jerome may 
be called upon to look over the book 
and supply the music. 

Another of the Woods manuscripts 
("Pet of the Petticoats") now on the 
shelf may soon be dusted off. 



"THE ESCAPE" ON COAST. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 9. 
Paul Armstrong will produce his 
new play "The Escape" either here or 
in San Francisco. The playwright ar- 
rived in Los Angeles a few days ago. 



WILLIAMS PLAYING HIMSELF. 

Harry Williams has been engaged 
for an important comedy role in 
"Bachelors and Benedicts" by H. H. 
Frazce. The part is a prototype of 
Harry's own personality — that of a 
sportively inclined pleasure-loving 
song writer who composes a ditty and 
teaches it to other members of the 
cast. For the proper development of 
the part Williams has written and will 
sing a song in the piece, entitled 
"There's No Place Like Home When 
There's Nowhere Else to Go." 

Others of the cast are Ralph Herz, 
Edna Baker, Nina Blake, Grace Good- 
all, Regina Conelli, Jane Garrison, 
Lawrence Eddinger, Horace James, 
Warren Cooke. 



TAKING SALLIE FISHER'S PLACE. 

Sallic Fisher will in all likelihood 
retire from the cast of "The Woman 
Haters" (Astor) in the immediate fu- 
ture. 

Sophye Barnard has been watching 
the show regularly since Tuesday 
evening. She may be Miss Fisher's 
successor. 



»♦ 



GETTING OUT A "NO. 2.' 

Satisfied that the show is worth 
while, Cliff Gordon has started the or- 
ganization of a second company «»f 
"Life's Show Window." 



"The Girl from Tokio," a mh:.|! mu- 
sical >how put on by Prank M !!■■;• has 
been routed fir ttu s"i,:lu"i ■■■',■• 
nighters. 



14 



VARIETY 



REAL MUSIC HALL COMING BACK 
TRAVESTY & THING S LIKE THAT 

The Weber & Fields Revived Fun Company Opening in 
New Home Nov. 2. Burlesques, "The Merry Con- 
trast " and "Without the Law." 100 People on 

the Stage 



New York is to have a real blown- 
in-the-bottlc music hall Nov. 2, when 
Weber & Fields will project their fun 
company onto the stage of its new 
home on West 44th street. Oct. 31, 
as a "Thursday night opening" is a 
possibility. 

The first production will contain (in 
the second act) two travesties on cur- 
rent New York successes. They will 
be called "The Merry Contrast" 
("Merry Countess" — Casino) and 
"Without the Law" ("Within the 
Law"— Eltinge). 

Besides the round number of fifteen 
principals, enough choristers will glide 
within the range of vision to make a 
full one hundred people in the finales. 

The general scope of the entertain- 
ment, as far as outlined for publica- 
tion at present, will bring back the 
former Weber & Fields Music Hall 
(now Weber's), with all its glory em- 
bellished by a modern theatre of large 
capacity. The opening of the new 
show will also mark the first perform- 
ance in the West 44th street house. 

Another large production that will 
get its start Oct. 17 at Albany is 
"The Sun Dodgers." Lew Fields is 
rehearsing the company which Eva 
Tanguay will head. About sixty-five 
persons are going through the pre- 
liminaries. Of these, fourteen are 
principals. The show will play Pitts- 
burgh after a few one-nighters. It is 
aimed for the Broadway, New York, 
following Damrosch's opera, "The 
Dove of Peace," due to open at the 
Broadway Nov. 4. 

The music hall company began re- 
hearsals Tuesday. In addition to the 
stars, the principals will include — also 
as stellar luminaries — Jack Norworth, 
Nora Bayes, Frank Daniels, Marie 
Dressier, Bessie Clayton. 



"FOLLIES" AND "LADY" OPEN. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 

Ziegfeld's "Follies" at the Forrest 
and "The Lady of the Slipper" (with 
Montgomery and Stone and Elsie 
Janis) had their initial showing this 
week, each having an opening without 
opposition. It was reported Ziegfeld 
had parted with $1,800 in order to have 
the opening of the Herbert opera post- 
poned one night. This was, however, 
denied, the postponement having been 
arranged for some time ago when it 
was certain that the show could not 
be given a dress rehearsal before Mon- 
day. 

"The "Follies" got off to a flying 
start at the Forrest Monday night, the 
theatre being crowded with an appre- 
ciative and thoroughly pleased audi- 
ence. The show ran from 8.15 to 11.45. 
There was much in evidence to show 
that there was considerable pruning to 
be done. This year's "Follies" is nDt 
as good as some others. It is good 
and poor in many places. The music 



is, with one or two exceptions, about 
on the usual average of Ziegfeld pro- 
ductions, But it is a big, pretty pro- 
duction, handsomely dressed without 
elaborate stage equipment and the 
Ziegfeld beauty chorus is there. 

Leon Errol scored solidly in the 
comedy. Bert Williams comes in for a 
liberal share. Ray Samuels is prom- 
inent, filling the spot vacated by Fannie 
Brice. Lillian Lorraine appeared op- 
portunely and has one or two catchy 
numbers to sing, while there are sev- 
eral sprightly dances interpolated, 
Stella Chatelaine and Leon Errol win- 
ning favor in these. Vera Maxwell is, 
of course, on view and there is a big 
company in support of the principals. 
The "Follies" will be a much better 
show in a week or two. 

The Cinderella story with Mont- 
gomery and Stone and Elsie Janis 
got going Tuesday night at the Chest- 
nut Street Opera House with equally 
as much hurrah. The house was filled 
and those in front waxed enthusiastic 
over the production, already claimed 
as the most brilliant seen in the mu- 
sical comedy line here in many years. 
There are three acts in the new fan- 
tasy. 

Anne Caldwell and Lawrence Mc- 
Carty furnished the book. The lyrics 
are by James O'Dea and the music 
by Victor Herbert. The music aroused 
much enthusiasm. There was hardly 
a number not repeatedly encored. The 
arrival of Cinderella in a chariot 
drawn by six galloping ponies; the 
ballroom scene in the second act and 
the dancing feature called the "Har- 
lequinade" in the third act are won- 
ders for beauty and elegance. 

Numerous specialties are introduced 
throughout the action of the piece. 

Montgomery and Stone as a pumpkin 
and scarecrow get back to somewhat 
familiar business as in "The Wizard of 
Oz," but they have new dances, and 
Miss Janis won much favor in the role 
of "Cinderella." 

Lydia Lopoukowa, the Russian 
dancer, led a large ballet through a 
spirited number which won much ap- 
plause. 

"The Lady of the Slipper" is a big 
and sumptuous production. Charles B. 
Dilingham is accredited with having a 
success on his hands at once. 

Last night "The Follies" was cut 
down to two act. closing at 10.55. 



CHORUS GIRL EPIDEMIC. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 
Philadelphia has a chorus girl epi- 
demic to deal with. The Walton and 
St. James hotels were directly threat- 
ened with the invasion of choristers 
for the "Lady of the Slipper" and 
Ziegfeld's "Follies," opening here this 
week. 

Each of the hotels put on four ex- 
t tra night watchmen. 



WALLER LEAVING FOR THE ROAD 

Lewis Waller's revival of "Henry 
V," of which the New York dailies 
spoke in the highest terms, will end 
its short-lived run at Daly's Saturday 
night and be succeeded Monday by the 
Sarah Bernhardt Queen Elizabeth 
moving pictures. 

Mr. Waller will take to the road 
with a more or less extensive reper- 
toire of plays, accompanied and sup- 
ported by his leading lady, Madge 
Titheradge. 

Miss Titheradge's proposed tour !n 

"A Butterfly on the Wheel" was 

nipped in the bud through Waller's 

desire to have her remain in New 

York for his presentments, much to 

the chagrin of the Shubcrts, who had 
planned to send the piece on tour with 
her in the stellar role. 



MUSICIANS' UNION WEAKENING. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

A movement, led by Charles Hahn. 
formerly leader of Mc\ ickcr's theatre 
orchestra, gained an impetus yesterday 
which may abolish the rule governing 
minimum number of musicians to be 
employed in first class theatres. The 
resolution was laid on the table by the 
musicians' body to be taken up at the 
next meeting owing to the law which 
requires that proposed changes in con- 
stitution be presented thirty days be- 
fore adoption. 

It is openly claimed that this rule 
has closed four theatres and thrown 
quite a number of men out of work. 

Theatres now running without or- 
chestras are Blackstone, Powers, Cort 
and McVicker's. 

When William A. Brady takes pos- 
session of the Princess next week it is 
expected that he will remove the or- 
chestra from that house. 

Hahn's movement is taken as a sign 
of weakening on the part of the union, 
but which, if successfully put through, 
would remedy a bad condition existing 
at present. 



MANAGER AGAINST UNION. 

Niles, O.. Oct. 9. 

No settlement has been reached in 
the union trouble between Manager 
Murray of the Warren Opera House 
at Warren and Local No. 54, Interna- 
tional Alliance Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployes, which covers both Niles and 
Warren. 

The union claimed visiting road 
shows at Warren should engage a 
stage carpenter and pay him $30 a 
week. Manager Murray declined, say- 
ing he had a previous agreement with 
the union which called for a $15 scale. 
Murray's refusal to pay the difference 
resulted in the Warren O. II. em- 
ployes walking out and placing the 
house on the unfair list. 

Murray is also manager of the Niles 
Opera House. This is not the first 
time the stage hands have had trouble 
here. In 1911 a squall resulted when 
non-union men worked the stage of 
the Warren. 

Oscar Schcck, of Cleveland, third 
vice-president. I. A. T. S. E., after a 
few days' stay in New York, left 
Monday for Niles to attempt an ad- 
justment of the union differences. 



WALTER'S ROYALTY IN DISPUTE. 

There is every indication of an im- 
minent lawsuit over the royalty >>n 
"Fine Feathers," the authorship of 
which is attributed to Eugene Walter 
and which is now playing to enormous 
business at the Cort, Chicago, under 
the management of H. H. Frazee. 

The piece was originally produced 
under the title "Homeward Bound," 
at which time it was the joint work 
of Walter Hackett and Eugene Wal- 
ter, and proved a failure. 

Later Hackett sold his rights in the 
piece to Walter, who rewrote the play, 
retaining in it but one situation from 
the "Homeward Bound" script. After 
that, according to the story in circu- 
lation. Hackett hypothecated his 
"rights" in "Homeward Bound" to Mr. 
Case, proprietor of the Algonquin 
Hotel, New York, as security for a 
board bill. 

Mr. Waller, when seen, admitted 
that he had heard of Case's claim for 
a share of the royalties on "Fine 
Feathers," but refused to enter into 
any discussion of the matter other 
than to say that he expects to be sued, 
at which time he would produce an 
absolute bill of sale for the "Home- 
ward Bound" manuscript executed to 
him by Hackett. 



OPEN FAIR WEEKS. 

The Coleman Circuit is worried over 
the forthcoming State Fair dates at 
Jackson, Miss. (Oct. 21-28) and Shreve- 
port, La. (Oct. 30-Nov. 2). J. J. Cole- 
man has booked but one show during 
the period for Jackson, and has four 
days open in Shreveport. 

Sam Rork's "Balkan Princess" in its 
first southern trip got $1,428 in Shreve- 
port Oct. 3. It was the third musical 
show of the season to play the town. 

"Polly of the Circus," on a southern 
tour, has switched its time, taking 
Louisiana and Mississippi off the route. 



"C. O. D." PUT ON. 

"C. O. D.," a new American farce 
by Frederic Chapin, under John Cort's 
direction, will be given its first pres- 
entation this week at the Teck, Buf- 
falo. 

In the company are Percy Plunkett. 
John T. Baker, Eva Condon, Grace 
Morrissey, Maud Hanaford, Isabclle 
Vernon, Charles A. Murray, Sam Ed- 
wards, Charles Brown, Edward Moore, 
Ffolliet Paget, Clare Krall, Adelyn 
Wesley, Charles Walton, Antonio M. 
Moreno, Vernon H. Macdonald, Geo. 
Betts, Harry Rottcardt, William Kelly. 
Arthur Slosson, Henr Davis, Thomas 
Stone. All the action takes place in 
the Catskill mountains. 

Edgar MacGregor staged the pro- 
duction. 



"THE WELSH BUNTY." 

Walter Hast has secured by cable 
"Little Miss Llewelyn," which is de- 
scribed in England as "The Welsh 
Bunty," and which made a success at 
the Vaudeville theatre, London. When 
presented here he will probably bring 
over the original company, including 
Hilda Trevclyn. 



Mary Elizabeth has been booked for 

a brief tour of South Africa follow 

ing her engagements in England next 
spring. 



VARIETY 



15 



"THE SKIRT" SAYS 

SPEAKING OF WOMAN. MOSTLY 



A star and her husband are not 
as friendly at present as they have 
been. The better half devoted all of 
his time to promoting his wife upon 
the stage, until she is recognized as a 
standard attraction in musical comedy 
circles. When the husband's ambi- 
tions were realized, his frau found a 
member of her company she preferred, 
leaving the family relations greatly 
strained. 

Speaking of the dissolution of the 
marriage bonds, I am told a well- 
known vaudeville man is quite on the 
outs with his wife. If a divorce does 
not follow, the separation that has oc- 
curred will be permanent, according to 
my sources of information. There 
appears to be nothing more serious in 
the disagreement than incompatibil- 
ity of temperament or temper, I don't 
know just what they call it. All I 
hear is the husband wanted his wife to 
be a trifle more economical, besides 
grieving because there was no little 
vaudeville agent about to call him 
father. 

Edna Goodrich (Hammerstein's) car- 
ries the honors so far this season for 
handsome clothes. A gown of black 
lace, the pattern beaded, will probably 
go down in history as the most gor- 
geous gown ever worn in vaudeville. 
The opera cloak is a close second. 
It is worth a trip to the theatre just 
to see Miss Goodrich put a hat on. 

There is no reason why Gladys 
Vance (5th Avenue) should dress in 
obsolete fashion. A woman of the 
stage who isn't well dressed nowadays 
might as well retire. Irene Lucey (on 
the same bill as Miss Vance) proves 
a woman can dress simply and be well 
gowned. Miss Lucey is a stunning 
girl. Her dress of white chiffon draped 
over a white foundation with a touch 
of Alice blue velvet ribbon, is lovely. 

The two girls with the Six Steppers 
(Sth Avenue) wear dancing frocks of 
cherry chiffon over white. The change 
to all white was also pretty. 

Willa Holt Wakefield, the lady of 
the plumes, has gone in for small hats. 
With a handsome evening gown of 
blue, a poke bonnet (the crown con- 
sisting of yards and yards of meline) 
Miss Wakefield is good to behold. 

Lulu Glaser's one real gown is a 
gem. The skirt is pink satin, over 
which is a panier of cut velvet in the 
same shade. The bodice is also of vel- 
vet. A taupe colored hat finishes this 
charming costume. 



Another case of where the newspa- 
per man is getting the worst of it, I 
am told, is happening before our very 
eyes. In this family jar, a leading man 
also has reached the limelight of scan- 
dal. The wife who dotes upon him 
did nothing secretly, informing her 
spouse of the transplanted affections. 
There was no explosion. Newspaper 
men hear so much about these things. 



I suspect, that when they are brought 
home they are shock-proof. 

Sybil Brennen with Jim Diamond 
(Colonial) just misses being a good 
dresser. Miss Brennen's first dress of 
pink charmeuse is lovely, but is 
spoiled by a white hat. Her second 
costume of green and gold deserves 
slippers to match. 

Ruby Hoffman in "Detective Keen" 
(Colonial) is a pretty brunette whose 
maid's costume is perfect in detail. 
That can't be said of Lulu Glascr. 
Imagine a maid in black satin. 

Mile. Dazie has gone in for some- 
thing new — the permanent wave. One 
glance at Dazie's kinky head is 
enough. But f)azie says it will come 
out all right in a few days. We shall 
see! 

If "Tantalizing Tommy" didn't get 
over, the gowns in the second act did. 
It was like turning over a page in a 
fashion book. 



"THE WOMAN' HATERS' CLUB.'* 

"The Woman Haters" will add to the glut ot 
musical comedy In town. It is Infinitely better 
than some samples we have on hand Just now, 
and not In the same high class with at least 
two of the reigning musical successes.— Evening 
Sun. 

Such success as it has will be due to the 
lovely music and to the good work of sev- 
eral people In Its cast.— Times. 

The music— the waltc-ttls of "The Woman 
Haters"— Is perhaps the prettiest In the. city 
at the present time— and that Is saying a lot. 
—American. 

The music Is the thing in this play, after 
all.— Herald. 

It Is one of the scores that the dance or- 
chestras will revel In all winter, for such 
is the Hit and sparkle of Its tunes that they 
will keep tired feet moving all night. The 
libretto is more or less sogglly Teutonic even 
In George V. Hobart's adaptation.— World. 
"THE BRUTE." 

So It will not be enough to say that any- 
thing more tedious and Inept In the form 
of drama has rarely been offered to the pub- 
lic of the largest city In this country.— Sun. 

As to "The Brute" as a whole. If it does 
rear Itself on Its hind lege. It will probably 
not walk far before New York audiences, al- 
though on "the road" It may be regarded as 
a work of genius.— World. 

"The Brute" was not lacking In a certain 
sincerity, but It was amateurishly put to- 
gether, clumsily dialogued and crude. Some 
master hand might yet make a play of It, 
but not an agreeable one.— American. 

Messrs. Comstook and Oest, who produced 
it, gave It admirable settings, particularly 
the second act, a country house, which was 
a handsome scene. But the play Itself has 
small appeal— Herald. 



$2,000 FOR BUFFALO BILL. 

London, Oct. 9. 

An offer of $2,000 a week has been 
made for Buffalo Bill in the halls over 
here next summer. The time is set 
for eight weeks. 

Jesse Freeman, of the Burns Agen- 
cy, cabled the proposition to Jenie Ja- 
cobs in New York. A previous ten- 
der of $1,000 weekly for the famous 
scout was not listened to by him. 



BIRD MILLMAN IN 8. A. 

London, Oct. 9. 
The H. B. Marinelli agency has 
placed Bird Millman for three months 
in South Africa, opening there during 
December. She will return to reap- 
pear in London next May. Marinelli 
has been keeping the wire act busy 
over here for three years. This week 
Miss Millman and her company are in 
Hamburg. In November they go 10 
Hanover. 



BERLIN. 

Berlin, Oct. 1. 
Circus Schumann, as well as Circus 
Busch hasr opened. In both houses 
preparations for the usual circus pan- 
tomimes are well under way. In the 
meantime they are playing nine of an 
equestrian bill. 



Komodienhaus, as the former Neucs 
Operetten theatre was named (after 
the change in management) is bring- 
ing some innovations to Berlin. The 
habitual extra fee for reserving seats 
in advance has been done away with. 
Tickets bought in advance are now 
reduced in price. 

In the new Metropol Revue Madge 
Lessing made a special hit when ap- 
pearing in tights covered with black 
lace. It is "some costume"! 

Returning to a policy discarded for a 
time, a variety act appears in the Met- 
ropol Revue in the person of Herr 
Kornau, the whistler. The applause 
he got shows that also here people like 
revues to be livened up a bit by spe- 
cial turns. 

Charlottenburg's Municipal opera 
house will open Nov. 1. The seating 
capacity is 3,000. 

The opera singers are returning to 
America to fulfill engagements at the 
Metropolitan Opera. Gadski sailed 
Sept. 24. William Hinshaw sails early 
this month. 



Leo Sleczak is using the opportunity 
to give a concert. On account of her 
illness Geraldine Farrar has not been 
able to form any definite plans. 



ALICE LLOYD FAR AWAY. 

St. John, N. B., Oct. 9. 

The first glimpse of Alice Lloyd in 
the Maritime Providence has been 
given through "Little Miss Fix-It" 
now playing around this far off coun- 
try. 

The reception and enthusiasm over 
the talented little lady from Old Eng- 
land has never been equaled in this 
territory. She has drawn very big, but 
says the jumps arc too long around 
here, with the people more conserva- 
tive than in the States. 



NINA PAYNE. 

Nina Payne, whose portrait is repro- 
duced on the cover of this issue is the 
feature of the pantomimic dancing pro- 
duction, "La Somnambule." 

Of exceptionally attractive stage 
presence, and a dancer of unusual 
ability, she has secured for herself the 
name of a high class standard vaude- 
ville attraction. 

Her success in her latest vehicle has 
been gained on the substantial worth 
both of artist and offering. "La Som- 
nambule" and Miss Payne are occu- 
pying an important position in the 
highest-priced bills. 



Nick Kaufman, after six year^ away 
from home returned to New York 
last week. He will locate on Long 
Island, returning to Europe occasion- 
ally to see his son, who is studying on 
the other side 



WITH THE FRE9S AGENTS. 

Stella Mayhew has Joined "The Singing 
Teacher," the piece Lew Fields last season 
bought for a Joint starring tour for himself 
and Marie Dressier. 



Geraldine Farrar, the Orand Opera star, who 
sails for America on the "Kronprluz Wllhelm" 
Oct. SO, 1» reported as fully recovered from 
her former Illness. 



Among the operas to be produced this sea- 
son by Andreas Dlppel, general manager of 
the Philadelphia-Chicago Orand Opera Co., will 
be Carl Goldraark's "The Cricket on the 
Hearth" in English. Other new operas will 
be three in French and five In Italian. 



Some of the Uroadway managers and play- 
wrights are getting good publicity out of their 
activities in the present presidential campaign. 
They are the main stems In the Wilson and 
Marshall Theatrical League with headquar- 
ters In the Cadillac Hotel. 



"Where the Trail Divides," Kllmt ft Oas- 
solo's production, at Pittsburg last week, has 
Earl T. Robs (playing Robert Bdeson's for- 
mer role) Horace V. Noble. Harry J. Scott, 
Ray S. Drown, Edward Menlove, Archie An- 
derson, Tereso Lorraine, Edyth Mae Ham- 
ilton. Will Spink Is business manager. 



"Years of Discretion," a new comedy, by 
Frederick and Fanny Hatton, Chicago 
writers, will be the next David Btelasco pro- 
duction, being brought out here Jan. 0, re- 
placing "The Governor's Lady" at the Re- 
public. "Years of Discretion" will have Its 
premiere at Syracuse, Nov. 4, going Into 
Power's, Chicago, Nov. 18. In the company 
will be Lyn Harding, Bruce McRae, Herbert 
Kelcey, E. M. Holland, Robert McWade. Jr., 
Grant Mitchell. Eugene Stockdale, Effle Shan- 
non, Alice Putnam, Mabel Uunyea. 

In James Forbes new comedy, "A Rich 
Man's Son," staged by himself, will be Paul 
Everton. Eugenie Woodward, Harold Grau. 
Jessie Ralph, Ralph J. Morgan, Gideon Bur- 
ton, John Cumberland, Mary Moran, Walter 
Allan, Fanla Marlnoff, Joseph Rleder, Jane 
Corcoran. It opens at the Harris, New 
York, Oct. 15. 



The first of "The Whip" actor colony from 
the other side to arrive Oct. 6 were Mary 
Illlngton, Ambrose Manning and Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Dlackall. Blackall Is the vil- 
lain . of the forthcoming Drury Lane spec- 
tacle at the Manhattan. 

Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree has cabled from 
Europe to the Llebler Co. that he will reach 
New York tomorrow (Oct. 12). Tree comes 
here to witness the Century theatre opening 
of "The Daughter of Heaven." 

Wlnthrop Ames has arranged for the curtain 
to rise at 8:45 o'clock next Monday night 
when Tie produces Schlltsler's comedy "The 
'Affairs' of Anatol" at the Little theatre. No 
tickets have been sold for this first show 
which will be for newspaper men and a few 
guests. 

Robert Mantell Is to add "Romeo" to his 
repertoire this season. 

Charles W. Collins has been doing the press 
work for "The Girl from Montmarte" now 
at the Chicago Opera House. Robert R. 
Clark, of the Tribune, has been assisting 
Sam Lederer in booming "The Man Higher 
Up" at the Olympic. Chicago. 

Louis Mac loon has been anpolnted press 
agent for the Palace Music Hall, during the 
time that Charles W. Collins Is writing lyr- 
ics for "The Widow's Honeymoon." 



Clarence Hyde has received the appointment 
of general press representative with Klaw ft 
Erlanger. The position was made vacant by 
the sudden death of John Murrav. Mr. Hyde 
had been out ahead of "The Pink Lady." He 
was for twenty years on the New York Her- 
old. before engaged by K. ft E. Howard Her- 
rlck got the open "Pink Lady" berth. 



Ada Reeve, the English singer, under con- 
tract to Martin Beck, who will be open on 
the B. F. Keith time (Colonial. New York. 
Oct. 14), arrived Sunday. While coming up 
the bay she received a Marconogram from 
the B. F. Keith New York Theatre* Co. tell- 
ing her to Inform the ship news men she did 
not believe In divorce and refused to appear 
on any bill containing n divorcee. It also 
said that Miss Reeve's husband. Mr. Cotton, 
should wear a thumb ring. But the Keith 
ppopln forgot *.o explain how they became 
authorized in Instruct an act under a Beck 
contract. When the newspapermen asked 
Miss Reeves shout her objections to divorces, 
she informed them I* was something she 
rather favored since marrying her present 
(and second) hushand. Miss Reeves was to 
have opened at the Colonial this week. The 
postponement looked like a ^hanc* to put 
over n story on the ground the Eugltsh wom- 
an ohjeofod to someone on the current Colo- 
nial program. 



GILMOUR WITH HITiTilARD. 

W. H. Gilmour, a well-known char- 
acter actor and stape director for 
Maude Adams, has been enpraecd by 
Klaw & Erlanper to create an impor- 
tant role in "The Arpylc Case." in 
which Robert HMliard is to be starred. 
The piece will have its premiere at 
Atlantic City. Oct. 17 



16 



VARIETY 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (October 14) 

In Vaudeville Theatres, Playing Three or Less Shows Dally 

(All houses open for the week with Monday matinee, when not otherwise Indicated.) 

(Theatres listed an "Orpheum" without any further distinguishing description are on 
the Orpheum Circuit. Theatres with "S-C" following; name (usually "Empress") are on the 
Suilivuti-Considlne Circuit.) 

Atft-uclfH booking the houses are denoted by single name or Initials, such as "Orph." 
Orphium Circuit — "U. II. O.." United Booking Offices — "W. V. A.," Western Vaudeville Man- 
atiuiV Association (Chicago) — "S-C." Sulllvan-Consldlne Circuit — "P," Pontages Circuit — 
"U«w," Marcus Loew Circuit — "Inter," Interstate Circuit (booking through W. V. A.) — 
"Bern." Freeman Bernstein (New York) — "Clan," James Clancy (New York) — "M." James 
c Mutthews (Chicago)— "Hod," Chas. E. HodKlns (Chicago) — "Tay." M. W. Taylor (Phil- 
adelphia)— "Fox." Ed. F. Kealey (William Fox Circuit) (New York)— "Craw," O. T. Crawford 
(St. Louis) — •Doy." Frank Q. Doyle (Chicago). 

Robert Alneley 
Welch. Me<ily ft Mont 

FULTON (loew) 
Ijow ft Ilalgbt 
Joe Dokcs 
Sea Shore Frolics 



New York 

ALHAMBKA (uluii 

Blanche Wal*h 

Diamond ft Rreniiau 

"Whoa Brown" 

Tornadoes 

Dollv Connolly 

Tiaulon Broi Co 

Holmes ft Buchanan 

Sansone ft Dellla 

Cliff Gordon 

BRONX (ubo) 

Granville. Plerpont Co 

Eva Taylor Co 

Madden ft Fltxpatrlck 

Zanettos 

Nellie Waring 

Darrell ft Conway 

Appollo 3 

Lew Hawlkns 

Rooney ft Bent 
UNION SQ Cubo) 

Bessie Wynn 

Jennings ft Dormer 

Sam Mann ft Co 

"The Girl" 

McMabon, Diamond 
ft Clemons 

Leo Carrlllo 

••Flying Ballet" 

Hill ft Sylvanl 

Ed F Reynard 

COLONIAL (ubo) 

Ada Reeve 

Chip ft Marble 

Stuart Barnes 

"Honor Among 
Thieves" 

Watson ft Santos 

Rice ft Cohen 

Farber Girls 

Shelvey Boys 

HAMMERSTEINS 
(ubo) 

Arnold Daly Co 

Maggie Cllne 

Nina Payne Co 

Ed Blondell Co 

Girl from Milwaukee 

Rube Dickinson 
Melody Maids 
Dixie Serenaders 
The Grazers 
Rosa Valerno Troupe 
Lewis ft Conway 

5TH AVE (ubo) 
Mclntyre ft Heath 
Bessie Clifford 
Laddie Cliff 
BonlU ft Lew Hearn 
Connolly ft Webb 
4 Londons 
Willard Slmms Co 
Rachel Lowe 
Victorlne ft Zolar 
SEVENTH AVE 
(loew) 
Cam 111 I Person 1 
Caulfleld ft Driver 
Frank Stafford Co 
Al Herman 
Egawa 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Nelson ft Floye 
Joe Flynn 
Frank Stafford Co 
Carter ft Davis 
Pete LaBelle Co 
(One to fill) 

AMERICAN (loew) 
Chas Irwin 
Ford ft Hyde 
Mnrle Russell 
"Flfl From Paris" 
Sidney ft Townley 
Harry LeClalr 
Fiddler ft Shelton 
Van Oa Troupe 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Princeton ft Yale 
Madeline Sachs 
"Flfl From Paris" 
Ward ft Webber 
Marie Russell 
La Velle ft Grant 
(Three to fill) 

GRAND ST. (loew) 
Spiegel ft Dunn 
"City Editor" 
Gordon ft Klnley 
Murry Bennett 
(Two to fill) 

(2d half) 
Fred Elliott 
Ed Zoeller 
(Four to fill) 

GREELEY SQ (loew) 
Madeline Sachs 
Nelson ft Floye 
lack Symonds 
'Herman Lleb Co 
Anderson ft Oolnes 
(Three to fill) 
2d half 
Sylnhanos 
D ft A McAvoy 
Herman Lleb Co 
Babette 
2 Sales 
(Three to fill) 

PLAZA (loew) 
Fred Elliott 
Maurice Samuels Co 



Mont 



Thelma I'arker 

(Two to filh 

2d half 

Grace Dixon 

Gordon ft Kinlcy 

"Double Crosn" 

Ward ft Smith 

(One to fill) 

NATIONAL (loew) 

Klttn-r 

Evelyn Clark 

Tossing Austins 

Mrownlng ft Lewis 

"Mayor ft Manicure" 

Robert Alnsley 

Welch. Mealy ft 
2d half 

Jack Case 

Luce ft Luce 

Wm Morrow Co 

Gerard ft Gardner 

Teddy Dupont 

Hanlon ft Hanlon 

(One to fill) 

DELANCEY ST. 
(loew) 

Sylphanos 

"Woman Haters" 

Carter ft Davis 

3 Gamons 

(Four to Oil) 
2d half 

Ford ft Hyde 

Wilkin* ft Wilkin* 

Anderson ft Golnes 

Alice Hanson 

(Four to All) 

YORKVILLE 
(loew) 
Ward ft Webber 
Moore ft Young 
ft Musical Waltons 
Halliday ft Carlln 
.Toe Flynn 
La Velle A Grant 

2d half 
Two Frankfords 
.Tack Symonds 
Halliday ft Carlln 
Maurice Samuels Co 
Fiddler ft Shelton 
Van Os Troupe 
LTNCOLN SQ 
(loew) 
I : cj Tonge 
Princeton ft Yale 
i^oun Office 
Matt Keefe 
Golden 3 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Shepperly Sis 
Sidney ft Townley 
"Sea Shore Frolics" 
Joe Whitehead 
3 Gamons 
(One to fill) 



ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Mrs Langtry 
Avon Comedy 4 
Arthur Deagon 
Woods ft Woods 3 
John P Wade Co 
Mack ft Walker 
Lambertl 
Juggling Burkes 
Vera Mlchelena 

BUSHWICK (ubo) 
Edna Goodrich Co 
Dolan ft Lenharr 
Burns ft Fulton 
Cooper ft Robinson 
Winsor McCay 
H»vdn. Dunbar ft 

Hay 
3 Ernests 
Lynch ft Zeller 
"Courtiers" 

BIJOU (loew) 
Spirit Paintings 
Dick ft Alice McAvoy 
2 Frankfords 
"High Life Jail" 
2 Sales 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
f» Musical Waltons 
Lucy Tonge 
Woman Haters 
Matt Keefe 
Eeawa 
(Two to fill) 

COLUMBIA (loew) 
."• Merry Youngsters 
(Five to fill) 

2d half 
Moore ft Young 
Holmes & Wells 
(Four to fill) 

SHT'BERT (loew) 
lack Case 
Tiii re ft Luce 
Wm Morrow Co 
Gerard ft Gardner 
Teddy Dupont 
Hanlon ft Hanlon 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Ralnh Kittner 
Evelvn Clark 
Tossing Austins 
Browning ft Lewis 
"Mayor ft Manicure" 



Mubci te 

HrcakawQv Harlowr> 

(One to fill) 

2d half 
rhns Irwin 
Lunch Room Cabaret 

Girls 
Loan Office 
Harry Le Clair 
Romalne Co 
(One to fill) 

JONES (loew) 
Carl Wallner 
Ethel Talbot 
T Osborne's Pets 

2d half 
Stantons 

Cornelia ft Wilbur 
(One to fill) 

(LIBERTY (loew) 
Hyde ft Williams 
Pete LaBelle 3 
(Three to fill) 
2d half 
Murry Bennett 
"City Editor" 
Thelma Parker 
(Two to fill) 

Bllllaara. Mont. 

ACME (sc) 
(Oct 16-17) 

Carly's Dogs 

Ell Dawson 

"Number 44" 

Brooklyn Comedy 4 

3 Staleys 



Edwin George 
Umbras Trio 

EMPIRE (p) 
(Open Thurs Mut) 
Liiron ft (!irl> 
L H Rose Co 
Paul Florus 
' r hies'son's Dogs 
Sol Berns 

Cedar Rapid* 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
Moore's "Mother 

Goose" 
Chas Kenna 
Clark S ft K Sterling 
Grimm ft Elliott 
C ft L Muller 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Four Vanls 
Gardner A Vincent 
Empire State 4 
J Small ft Small S 
Cannon ft Tracev 
A I Allen 

Chicago 

MAJESTIC (orph I 
Virginia Harned Co 
"Dance Dream" 
W H St James Co 
Olive Briscoe 
Bison City 4 
Wilson Bros 
Oraeer Sisters 
Harry Atkinson 
Clara Ballerina 

PALACE (orph) 
"Eternal Waltz" 
Bert Leslie Co 
Four Harveys 
Carson ft Willard 



EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Sam J Curtis Co 
3 Alex 
Harry Sauber 
Ines Lawson 
"Fun at Sea' 
Sylvester & Vance 
Davenport 

AMERICAN (in) 
"At Mldnigh "• 
Margartt Bird Co 
Mac Curtis 
Musical Win Her 
(One to fill) 

l)**ii%pr 

ORPHEUM 

Ed Hayes Co 

r'ae-'nr Nesl 

De Witt Burns ft T 

Whitfield ft Ireland 

Van Bros 
Konerz Bros 
John Hlgglns 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Lowe ft Edwards 
Joe Cook 

"Lean Year Girls" 
Von Hnmp ft Josselyn 
Jack Allman 
"Houseboat Party" 

Detroit 

TEMPLE (ubo) 
"An Opening Night" 
Maurice Freeman Co 
Van ft Schenck 
Linden Beckwlth 
4 McXallys 
MeCormlok A Irving 
Stlckney's Circus 
MILES (con) 
Camllle's Dogs 
Creatore's Band 
"Mother Goose" 
Jack Boyce 
Caren's Minstrels 
Rlchv ft Rounard 
Zeb Zarrow Troupe 



ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
I 'oily Moran 
Malulda ft Elvira 
Creasy ft Dayne 
Chick Sales 
Lester 

"Visions D'Art" 
La Vler 



Valentin* ft Bell 
Craig ft Williams 
Harrlsbursj 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Hunting ft Francis 
Willis Family 
Billy McDermott 
Pblna ft Picks 
(Three to fill) 

Hartford, Conn. 

POLIS (ubo) 
Tempest ft Ten 
Amoros Sisters 
Hufford ft Chain 
Morton ft Glass 
Robt H Hodge Co 
Van Hoven 
La Crandall 

llobokeu, X. J 

LYRIC (loew) 
Frank Bros 
"Double Cross" 
Force ft Williams 
Ed Zoeller 3 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
"Night of Wedding" 
Snlegel ft Dunn 
Breakaway Barlowes 
(Two to fill) 

H»nmmm City 

ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Paul Dickey Co 
Burr ft Hope 
John De Lorls 
Empire Comedy 4 
Chris Richards 
Stanley Sis 
3 Hassans 
Schmlttans 

EMPRESS (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Sombreros 
Curry ft Riley 
Leon a Guerney 
Sullivan ft Bartling 
Will Rogers 
"La Petite Gosse" 

GARDEN (con) 
Jewell's Manikins 
Pietro 

Prevost ft Brown 
"Charles the First" 
American Neweboy IS 
Five Goets 
Rose ft Ellis 
Sboen's Kids 
Werden ft Guiran 
Allie Leslie Hassan 



"WHO'S WHO"? 

A 20th CENTURY NOVELTY 



Boat os) 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Jessie Busley Co 
Bert Lev/ 
Coombs A Aldwell 
Andy Keller 
McDevltt, Kelley ft 

Lucy 
Musical Lassies 
Tom Davis Trio 
Boyle ft Brazil 
Montambo ft Wells 
ORPHEUM (loew) 
Kolllns ft KUf Sis 
M Livingston Co 
Granville ft Mack 
Hardeen 

Lawrence ft Edwards 
Savoys Co 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Folly Begere 
Hardeen 
Harry Antrim 
"Arm of Law" 
Hong Fong 
(Three to fill) 

Brockton, Mass. 

CITY (loew) 
Al H Wild 
Broughton A Turner 
Bandy ft Fields 

2d half 
Josie Flynn 
Cummlnas ft Gladding 
"Gent with Jimmy" 
Buffalo 
FAMILY (loew) 
Belle Dixon 
Harry Harvey 
Reck ft Preston 
Landry Bros 
(Two to fill) 

ACADEMY (loew) 
Rita Marchaud 
Geo Leonard Co 
Darey ft Williams 
Burt Cutler 
Restlvo 

Hnrry Brown Co 
Zelland Hunt 
Knapp ft Cornelia 
Flvlng Henrys 
(One to fill) 

Wntte. Mont. 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Marline ft Doll 
Hale ft Boyle 
Hyman B Adlcr 
Grace Leonard 
Paul Spadonl 

Cwlsrnrr. Can. 

SHERMAN GRAND 
Orph Oct 17-10) 
! Ethel Greeu 
* Toots Paka 
> Grace Emmet t Co 
' Ravno's Bulldoes 
:David Kldd 



Ramsdell 3 
Jimmy Lucas 
(One to fill) 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Mozarts 
Blbbos 

"Quaker Girl" 
John Neff 
"Clrcum Evidence" 
(One to AH) 

JULIAN (ro) 
Nels Rodney-Ranous 

Co 
These 3 Fellows 
Muslcsl Goolmans 
Claud Ranf 
Mareena ft DelU . 

2d half 
Nels Rodney-Ranous 

Co 
Llbonatl 
3 Bannans 
Edith Livingstone 
Johnson's Dogs 

LINDEN (m) 
Ed Hayes Players 
Valerie Sisters 
Llbonatl 
Johnson's Dogs 

3 Bannans 

2d half 
Raffln's Monkeys 
Musical Goolmans 
Bill Conklln 
Those 3 Fellows 
(One no fill) 

LINCOLN (con) 
Diaz Monkeys 
Rube Welch Co 
Richards ft Montrose 
Soils Bros 
Willard 
Plquo 

HAMLIN (con) 
Hazard Troupe 
Sam Hood 
Linton ft Girls 
Walton ft Brandt 
Six Abdallabs 

Cincinnati 

KEITHS (ubo) 
"More Sinned 

Against" 
Parrel Sisters 
Honshaw ft Avery 
Sherman Van ft Hv 
Elllott-Savonas 
Meredith Sister*? 
Lord Robert 
Dare Bros 

ORPHEUM (mi 
(Open Sun Mntl 
"Scotch Mlns Maids'" 
Berrv ft WPhclml 
William Flemen Co 

4 Burns Sisters 
Friary 

Sisters MoConncll 
rode ft Gelt 



Dnhuqne, la. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
Four Vanls 
Gardner ft Vincent 
Empire State 4 
J Small ft Small S 
Gannon ft Tracey 
Al Allen 

2d hflf 
Moore's "Mother 

Goose" 
Chas Kenna 
Clark S ft Sterling 
Grimm ft Elliott 
C ft L Muller 
(One to fill) 

nnlntk 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
"Everywlfe" 
Morris ft Allen 
Mignonette Kokln 
Gallettl's Monkeys 
Godfrey ft Henderson 
De Witt Young ft Sis 

Eaat St. Louis 

AVENUE (craw) 
Rose Valarlo Troupe 
We-Got-A-Four 
Franz Mlset 
Mack Dugal Co 
Leslie Hasson 

Edmonton. Can. 

ORPHEUM 

(Oct 21-23) 
Same bill as at Sher- 
man Grand. Calgary, 
this Issue. 

Fall River 

ACADEMY (loew) 
Hong Kong 
"Arm of Law" 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Lawrence ft Edwards 
Savoys Co 
(Two to fill) 

PREMIER (loew I 
Folly Btrgcre 3 
Harry Antrim 
2d half 
Kolllns ft Kllf Sis 
Granville ft Mack 

Fl«hklll. \. Y. 

ACADEMY (loew) 
Grace Dixon 
(Three to fill) 
2d half 
Hvde ft Williams 
i Three to fill) 

Ft. Wayne 

TEMPLE (wva) 
Great Leon Co 
Emllc Hoch Co 
Aurora 3 
Guerro ft Carmen 



l.*f»vet*e. lnd. 

FAMILY (wvo) 
Howard Bros 
Heron ft Douglas 
Zlg Zag 3 

Robert's Rats ft Cats 
Moore ft Browning 

2d half 
Conn ley ft Caff ray 
Laurie Ordway 
Great 'Richards 
Rogers ft Wiley 
Celeste Co 

Llncola, Neb. 

ORPHEUM 
W C Fields 
Grover ft Richards 
Roxy La Rocca 
Bradshaw Bros 
Rexos 
Lew Cooper 

l.oa tnsrelea 

ORPHEUM 
Williams ft Warner 
E F Hawley Co 
Annie Kent 
Minnie Allen 
Nat Wills 
"Antique Girl" 
Mclntyre ft Hardy 
Bertlseh 

EMPRESS sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Wallace's Birds 
Arlon 4 
Berry ft Berry 
Dena Cooper Co 
Joe B McGee 
"Incubator Girls" 
PANTAOES 

(Open Sun Mat) 
"Star Bout" 
Lorraine Dudley Co 
Provol 
Anollo Trio 
Lillian Sisters 
Lowell 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Chas Bowser Co 
Hlchman Bros Co 
Wilson ft Wilson 
Polzin Bros 
Chas ft Ada Latham 
Nick Conway 
Mori ft Scorn be 
Cameron Sisters 

"emnhtn 

ORPHEUM 

Grace Van Studdlford 
Llda McMillan Co 
Hlckev's Circus 
Froslnl 

Wynn ft Rueson 
Saytons 

Stewart Sis ft Escts 
Milwaukee 
MAJESTIC (orph) 
Honry E Dixey 
Nina Morris Co 



Lola Cotton 
Leonard ft Russell 
Julius Tannen 
Six Abdallahs 
Hopkins ft Axtell 
Great Libbey 

EMPRESS (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Musical Lunds 
lleddera 
Fox ft Ward 
"That Kid" 
"Fun in a Cabaret" 

CRYSTAL (con) 
Ed Jose Co 
■Rutan's Song Birds 
May Ward 
Harry Hayward Co 
Richards ft Montrose 
Combifl Bros 

>llnn»Mpoltn 

ORPHEUM 
(Open sun Mat) 

Mrs James Co 

Ida Fuller 

High Life 3 

Johnson's Travelogs 

Bobbe ft Dale 

3 Brennans 

Robt De Mont 3 
UNIQUE (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Virginia Grant 

Jacob's Dogs 

Eva Westcott Co 

Don Carney 

"Macy's Models" 
MILES (con) 

Lillian Mortimer Co 

Etta Leon Troupe 

John ft May Burke 

Bob Albright 

Eddy Foyer 

Carl Rosin Co 

Montreal- Can. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Felix ft Claire 
Rosalind Coghlaiu Co 
Hermlne Shone Co 
Borden ft Shannon 
Lydia ft Albino 
Gordon ft Marx 
Edgar Berger 

FRANCAIS (loewi 
Valals Bros 
William Smith 
French Stock Co 
Pearl Four 
Bessie Smith 
3 Bennett Sisters 

\>w Haven, Conn. 

POLI'S (ubo) 
Clark ft Hamilton 
Conlln, Steel A Carr 
Mysterious Edna 
Frank Rae Co 
Harvey De Vora 3 
Clara Inge 
Adonis ft Dog 

«>w Orleans 

ORPHEUM 
Master Gabriel Co 
Barry ft Wolford 
McKay ft Cnntwell 
Milton ft Dolly Nobles 
Edna Luby 
Kremka Bros 
Jordan Zeno A J 

.Ne»» Moekell*. If. Y 

LOEWS (loew) 
Romalne ft Co 
Wllklns ft Wllkins 
Shepperlv Sis 

2d half 
Love ft Halght 
"Hleh Life Jail" 
Golden 3 

Oakl«n«l CaL 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Owen McOlveney 

Nanon Onera Co 

C ft F Usher 

Dlero 

La Maze 3 

Ben Lew In 

Ryan Bros 

PANTAGES 
(Ooen Sun Mat) 

Child's Hawallans 

." Juggling Jewells 

Ned Burton Co 

Orpheus Comedy 4 

Black Bros 

<»u-o>n 

ORPHEUM 

(Oct 17-11M 
Wm Thomnson Co 
Gould ft Ashlyn 
Howard's Ponies 
Taknlnes 
(Two to fill) 

"•null* 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
"Drums Oude" 
Lew Sully 
Gould ft Ashlyn 
Casselll's Doga 
Merrill ft Otto 
Bellson's Boys 
Flying Weavers 

• •Hfi«n>|»hln 

KEITHS (ubo) 
Lulu Glnser Co 
Mason ft Keeler 
('has ft Fannie Van 
Donovan A McDonald 
Three Moris 
Gillette's Animals 
Conrad ft Whldden 
■ A rt Bowen 
Jordan Trio 

WILLIAM PENN 
(ubo) 
rha* Weber 
Kate Watson 
Chung Hwa Comedv 4 
Dolmore ft Lee 
(Two to fill) 

(Continued 



BIJOU (ubo) 
Howard 

Spencer ft Williams 
Mueller Trio 
Musical Rough Rldei ■« 
Brltton ft Hoch 
(One to fill) 

IMttMlMirich 
GRAND 
(Week Oct 14th) 
Graham Moffats 

Players 
Bell Family 
Dick, the Writing Do,« 
Mathews ft Alshaync 
Winsor Trio 
(Three to fill) 
HARRIS 
(Week Oct 14th) 
Texas Tommy Dan 

cers 
Cole ft Dunshy 
Lazwell ft Holland 
Mile Fallleres Dogs 
Skipper, Kennedy ft 

Reeves 
David ft Du Vail 
Watson ft Little 
Metz ft Metz 
Del-A-Phone 

IN»rflMiMl «»rr. 

ORPHEUM 
Amelia Bingham Co 
Nellie Nichols 
Frank Morrell 
Silvers 

Lewis ft Dody 
Azard Bros 
Flying Russells 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Neusa ft Eldred 
Klass ft Bernle 
Robi Hlldreth Co 
'Waltz Dream" 
Bohemian 4 
Verona Troupe 

PANTAGES 
(J American Beauties 
Schepp's Circus 
Espe ft Roth 
Cal Stewart 
Mabel Johnston 
Gypsy Wilson 

Provlilenvr 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
'Trained Nurses" 
Joe Welch 
Maxim ft Bobbv 
Robbie Gordone 
Bernlvlcl Bros 
Devine ft Williams 
Dean ft Pine 

«nprwmfnllt 

DPNBRCK (orph) 
(Oct HJ-1!)) 
"In 1W»»" 
Ballet Classioue 
Melville ft Hlggins 
Bowman Bros 
Asahi Troupe 
3 Collegians 
Berg Bros 

CLUNIE (so 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Chapman ft Borube 
Russell ft Church 
Ward Klare Co 
Green McH ft Deane 
"Night Roof Garden" 
PANTAGES 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Wootf oik's Chiclets 
Keene Trio 
Tom Kelly 
Gordon ft Rita 
Alice Teddy 

*•*!*>■» Hm« 
SALEM (loew) 
Josie Flynn 
Cummlngs ft Gladding 
"Gent with Jimmy" 

2d half 
Al H Wild 
Hroiuhtou ft Turner 
Bandy ft Fields 

ORPHEUM 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Elsie Ruegger Co 
Grace Cameron 
Dorothy Dalton Co 
Arnifitrong ft Clark 
Bounding' Pattersons 
Gordon Bros 
Lowe ft Devere 
EMPRESS (sc) 

(Open Sun Mat) 
Llna Pantzer 
Holden ft Herron 
Rogers ft Mcintosh 
Daniels ft Conrad 
Deodima 
I.adella Comlques 

"an Uteau 

EMPRESS (scl 
(Open Sun Mat) 
K re to re 

Bud ft Nellie Helm 
Belle ft Mayo 
James Reynolds 
"Kid Hamlet" 

PANTAGES 
"Lions Bride" 
Ma hello Fie her Co 
Fred Zobedle 
Carter's Manic 
Cook ft Stevens 
Saw sr vaM4 .|^ |>(( 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Ethel Barry more Co 

Fklyn Ardell Co 

Mary Elizabeth 

Oautler's Tov Shop 

Qulve ft McCarthy 

Jack Wilson 3 

:>lxon ft FleVJs 

Owen CIht'c 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Busse's Dogs 

Musette 

on pa«e 27), 



VARIETY 



17 




u 



LONDON 

VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE 

6 OBBN ST., LEICBSTEB SQUABE. (OABLB "JIMBUCK, IX>*IM>V."> 

W. BUCHANAN TAYLOR. Repr-«ati~. 

(BAYARD) 

Mail for American! and Europeans In Europe, If addressed care VARIETY, as above, 
will be promptly forwarded. 




London, Oct. 2. 
J. F. McArdle, an American actor 
lontf- resident in London, has been en- 
gaged as chief comedian in the Al- 
hanibra Revue. For the Revue are 
also engaged Julian Alford, an Ameri- 
can dancer; Muriel Hudson, an Amer- 
ican musical comedy actress; Kitty 
Mason, one of the Gaiety Girls; Kath- 
leen Courtney, Dorothy Selborne and 
Mamie Buck, all musical comedy girls; 
Maudie Lloyd (Marie's youngest sis- 
ter) and Carlotta Mosetti, the dancer, 
who made so great a hit in the Empire 
Ballet of New York. 



D'Armond and Carter had trouble 
with their orchestra at the Palace on 
the opening night, and a rehearsal was 
called on the following day by Mr. 
Butt. Mr. Butt's treatment of this act 
was splendid, for whilst D'Armond and 
Carter quitted trying after the first five 
minutes on the stage, he overlooked 
this on account of the difficulty they 
had with the orchestra. Towards the 
middle of the week they were going 
quite well and the fact that they were 
kept on a second week shows that the 
management was satisfied with their 
performance. 

One of the worst monkey acts I 
have ever seen was that of "Hans" and 
"Greta" at the Palladium. 



The names of playlets on the triple 
bill which Charles Frohman will pre- 
sent at the Duke of York's theatre 
early in October are "Overruled," a 
demonstration by George Bernard 
Shaw; "The Widow of Wisdale Head," 
a fantasy by Arthur Pinero; and 
"Rosalind," a comedy by J. M. Barrie. 



Gaby Deslys tells me she was very 
much hurt by the publication in 
Variktv of the story that the Lord 
Chamberlain's representative had in- 
terfered with her performance at the 
Palace. It was not our intention to 
hurt Gaby, but to state facts, and this 
we did. 



C. B. Cochran says he has secured a 
site for a permanent circus in London. 
It is to be within a stone's throw of 
Piccadilly Circus. 



It is said Sir Herbert Tree tried very 
hard to persuade Davd Belasco to re- 
lease Lyn Harding, but the American 
manager would not consent. He is ex- 
pected to return to London in the 
spring. 



H. B. Irving is going to South Af- 
rica after the run of "Evcrywoman" at 
Drury Lane. 



Cartmell and Harris sail immedi- 
ately for America. The graceful danr 
■ng boy has just taken unto himself a 
complete outfit of English clothes. A- 
the parcel of goods came from Bond 



street, they will probably create a con- 
siderable amount of jealousy on 
Broadway. 



If the proposed booking arrange- 
ments between the Variety Theatres 
Controlling Co. and the London Thea- 
tres of Varieties comes off it will 
mean a great simplification in the 
handling of acts over both tours. The 
Variety Theatres Controlling Co. has 
eighteen halls, including the Alhambra, 
Paris; Alhambra, Glasgow; Palace, 
Manchester, and Hippodrome, Brigh- 
ton. The London Theatres of Varie- 
ties (popularly known as the Gibbons 
circuit) have about sixteen halls, all in 
London. There is no question of amal- 
gamation financially, but merely for 
booking purposes. Paul Murray is the 
General Manager of the Variety Thea- 
tres Controlling Company, and Charles 
Gulliver the General Managing Direc- 
tor of the London Theatres of Varie- 
ties. 



David Bliss, the London agent, 
writes to say that the allegation made 
by a man named Webb, that he had 
been responsible for two members of 
the Symphony Girls leaving that orga- 
nization, is without the slightest foun- 
dation. He states that the reverse was 
the case, that two members of the 
Symphony Girls company approached 
him to take over their business, and 
that no arrangement between him and 
the two girls has ever been come to 
Nothing more has been heard of the 
petition which Webb was stated lo 
have been organizing against Bliss. 



Leslie Stuart, whose real name is T. 
A. Barrett, appeared in the Bankruptcy 
Court again the other day, and asked 
for a month's adjournment in which 
to prepare another proposal to his 
creditors. The scheme, it is stated, 
would provide for the payment of not 
less than $1.75 to the $5. 



Carroll Johnson had his English 
opening at Liverpool and did well. He 
goes to the Alhambra, Glasgow, and 
then intends to do some sight-seeing, 
taking in Edinboro and as much of 
Ireland as is possible in the time. He 
and his wife sail for New York Oct. 17 
by the Cedric. 



Leoncavallo's new opera in two 
scenes, which he calls "I Zingari," does 
not touch a new theme. There are 
thrilling moments in it and some ex- 
cellent music. 



For the first time since the opening 
of the Alhambra, Glasgow, shares arc 
quoted in excess of par. A few months 
ago they could have been bought for 
$3 apiece. Now they arc quoted at 
over $5 a share. 



Julian Wylie has itnented an act 
which he calls "The Flickergraph." 

Jn five scenes there i? enacted what is 



PARIS 



By E. G. KENDREW 
63 Bis Sue St. Dldler 



Variety is on sale in Paris at the 
principal kiosques on the grand boule- 
vards. Back numbers may be obtained 
at the Librarie Etrangere, 37 Rue St. 
Augustin (near Place de l'Opera). 



Paris, Oct. 1. 
W. E. Ritchie has been specially en- 
gaged to take his troupe to the Ca- 
sino, Monte Carlo, by Count Offen- 
bach (descendant of the famous com- 
poser) for one day, Feb. 27, the sal- 
ary being $600. This is a record for 
a bicycle act. 

Gen. . Ed. La Vine has secured the 
services jf Tommy, a French come- 
dian, who played in the sketch at the 
Marigny the same time as the non- 
chalant juggler. La Vine is booked to 
open at the Paris Folies Bergere in 
1914. 

The Coliseum has again tried its 
luck, opening Oct. 1, under the man- 
agement of L. Klopp, as already an- 
nounced. A few vaudeville acts are 
played, but the program is mainly pic- 
tures at present. 



Mme. Trouhanowa, who played in 
the "Miracle" in London, is booked to 
open in January next at the London 
Alhambra. 



Bert Angere is listed for the Win- 
tergarten, Berlin, in the fall of 1913. 

The American title of "La Flambee." 
withdrawn this week from the Porte 

called a "chase comic," the chief char- 
acter being Filmhead. The scenes are 
all in gray, and the actors all alive, 
they using a gray and white make-up, 
the idea being to give as near as pos- 
sible an impression of a real cinemato- 
graph show. This new act is to be 
produced within the next few weeks. 



The American skating rink, in the 
Rue Saint Didier, Paris, said to be the 
most fashionable rink in Europe, 
opened for the season Sept. 20. It is 
again under the management of A. P. 
Demers. There is a staff of forty-two 
English and American instructors, etc. 

The Eastern Magician Linga Singh, 
whose real name is Arma Nath Dutt. 
was sent to jail for four months 
in the Second Division for obtaining 
money by false pretences with intent 
to defraud. He advertised for a partner 
with money and induced Albert Con- 
way, an ex-butcher, to put in about 
$1,000 on the strength of showing a con- 
tract with the Gibbons Circuit, at $500 
per week. Dutt says he was misled by 
an agent who gave him a bogus con- 
tract. This agent who has since been 
in jail denies that he had any business 
with Dutt. 



Shirley Kellogg, from the New York 
Winter Garden show, will be thr priu- 
ripal in the Hippodrome Rcvur. to l>c 
put on Oct. >8. It wa* at fir ^t intend 
cd she should <l.. a *i"/T ,n ," <"»j"~i ia1u 

in the hall. 



Saint Martin Theatre, Paris, after a 
long run, will be "The Spy." The 
English title is "The Turning Point." 



The vacancy caused by the death of 
Jan Block as director of the Conserva- 
toire of Music at Antwerp, a well- 
known institution in Belgium, has at 
last been filled by the appointment of 
Emil Yamback to the position. 



Maurice Maeterlinck is at work on 
a sequel to "The Blue Bird" in which 
Tyltyl and Mytil are grown up. His 
wife, Georgette Leblanc, is preparing 
a version of the "Oiseau Bleu" for 
children, after the lines of Perrault. 
The poet is at present at his Nor- 
mandy castle, Abbey Saint Wandrille, 
France. 

The Imperial theatre, Paris, which 
opened Sept. 21, is a delightful little 
house, decorated in white and gold. 
There are no galleries, and the stalls 
rise on a slope. But the least said of 
the opening program the better. 

Mme. Simone will create a piece, 
specially written for her, entitled 
"Sauf Conduit," when she returns to 
America. Prince, the French actor, 
has been booked for a London music 
hall in June, 1913. Mile. Dorziat is 
als > going to London next March, to 
pj.iy in "L'Eventail" of Dc Flers and 
Caillavet. 



Cornuche, the director of the Casino, 
at Dcauville, the Ambassadeurs and 
Alcazar d'Ete, Paris, has his eye on a 
plot of ground between the' Rue Roy- 
ale and the Rue Boissy d'Anglas (close 
to the Madeleine) where he will build 
a music hall, if the negotiations go 
through. Although near the famous 
church, no opposition on that score 
will be listened to in Paris. 



A revival of the stage version of 
Emile Zola's "Nana" will be produced 
at the Ambigu shortly. Hertz and 
Coquelin have not been lucky with this 
house so far. 



Although theatrical managers grum- 
ble that Brussels is a hard field for 
their enterprises, and the Belgian cap- 
ital already has more theatres than 
any other European city, in proportion 
to its population, another legitimate 
house is to be built on the Boulevard 
Anspach, at the corner of the Rue des 
Vanniers. The Monnaie reopens for 
the season Sept. 5 under the manage- 
ment of Kuffiroth & Guide, it being 
their thirteenth season there. Later 
on they will mount Paul Spaak's 
"Kaatje" as an opera. Baron Vic- 
tor Buffin Cain, the Parisian librettist, 
has made the book. This work was 
first produced at the Pare Theatre, and 
was a big success. 



Cot, the giant, height about 7 feet, 
and who traveled through America 
right years ago. died Sept 10 at th«? 
age of 2 T >. at hi* birthplace Saint 
Affriqur. A.t.i.-n. France Hi par 
CM? were farm labnj.r^ 



18 



V A R I E T Y 



NOTES 



Valeska Suratt is writing beauty ar- 
ticles for a western syndicate. 



Henry Guthrie has severed his office 
connections with Jay Hunt. 

Harrie Pierce has been installed as 
manager of the Lorch Stock Company, 
at the Opera House, Passaic, N. J. 

Max Rabinoff is still confined to a 
hospital in London, although his con- 
dition is considerably improved. 

Crouch and Welch who have been 
in Europe for some months, return 
to this side to open in November. 



Minnie Allen had to appear in. her 
traveling clothes at the Orphcum, Los 
Angeles, Monday. Trunks delayed in 
transit. 

Dan Gracey has been signed by F. 
W. Stair and T. W. Dinkins to replace 
Ed. Flavelle in their stock burlesque 
at the Greenwall, New Orleans. 

Willie Weston returned to New 
York Tuesday from "The Social 
Whirl," recalled here by the Shuberts. 
The show is in St. Louis this week. 

Bowers, Walters and Crooker have 
been booked to play Australia by the 
Marinelli agency. They open in No- 
vember for twenty-seven weeks. 



Geo. W. Jones and Harry Sylvester, 
both formerly of the famous "That 
Quartet" are rehearsing their new act 
which will open around Oct. 21. 



Ida St. Leon is to open in a new 
play under A. S. Stern's management 
sometime in November, playing to the 
Pacific Coast and back. 

William McCarthy, last season with 
the Montgomery and Stone show, is 
now playing opposite Clifton Craw- 
ford in "My Best Girl" at the Park. 



Dave Gordon, in advance of a Gor- 
don & North burlesque attraction, has 
returned to New York to resume his 
duties as office manager for the firm. 



Walter J. Kingsley, now wielding the 
press brush for Keith's New York 
theatres, is growing a moustache 
which he intends to have copyrighted. 



It was reported Wednesday that 
Piquo, the bar performer, was injured 
in a railroad accident on his way to 
Lancaster, Pa., that morning. 

Fred Zobedie was painfully injured 
Sept. 30 while performing his act at 
Pantages, Los Angeles. A defective 
stay wire caused him to fall eight feet, 
a scalp wound of three inches being 
inflicted. No serious developments are 
anticipated. 



Rex Falkner (American Newsboy 
Quartet) and Ida Jewell (daughter of 
Mme. Jewell (Jewell's Manikins) were 
married at St. Joe, Oct. 7. 

Frank P. Spellman has put out a 
novel catalogue of circus attractions 
which he is offering to fairs and fra- 
ternal festivals. The 24-page booklet 
is cut in the shape of the clown and 
the front and back covers are formed 
by the figure of the joey. 



Oscar and Suzette, dancers from 
England, arrived Tuesday for the Or- 
pheum Circuit, opening Oct. 28 at Chi- 
cago. The Four Harveys also arrived 
the same day. They reappear next 
week at the Palace, Chicago. 

Bonita and Lew Hearn are in town 
this week, although booked to play 
Cincinnati. They arrived Sunday and 
found four acts billed over them, 
whereupon they packed up and "set 
sail" for New York. 

The Cortland theatre, Cortland, N. 
Y., reopened Oct. 10 with four acts 
booked through Walter Plimmer. The 
Cortland is under the management of 
the Dillon brothers. 



The Five Pierriscoffis left the bill at 
the Temple, Detroit, last Friday, 
through an accident befalling one of 
them. Their present week's date at 
Rochester was filled by the Three 
Shelvey Boys. 

Cyril Courtenay, engaged for "With- 
in the Law," has signed with the Lieb- 
ler Co., leaving this week for Canada 
to join the George Arliss company in 
"Disraeli." After its stand in Toronto 
the show goes into Boston for a run. 

Gertrude Vanderbilt was operated 
on at Dr. Bull's sanitarium last Sun- 
day for a growth on her foot. She re- 
tired from the bill in the middle of last 
week at Milwaukee and has cancelled 
the Alhambra, New York, for next 
week. 

Nat S. Jerome, formerly a Hebrew 
character actor, has taken the man- 
agement of the Gold theatre, Broad- 
way and Varet street, Brooklyn. The 
Gold is now nearing completion. It 
is a $175,000 structure, to be devoted 
to pop vaudeville. 



George A. McDermott, formerly 
manager of the Union Square during 
its small time regime, and latterly 
treasurer at the Harlem Opera House, 
has been appointed manager of the 
Park, Youngstown, O. He assumed 
charge Monday. 

John World (World and Kingston), 
who became quite ill Sept. 30 while 
at the Orpheum, Sacramento, and was 
removed to a hospital to be operated 
on, will not be able to return to vaude- 
ville for at least six weeks. Mindell 
Kingston is at his bedside. 



"Over Night," William A. Brady's 
road show, which opened in Canada 
over a month ago, closes Saturday 
night in Lowell, Mass., the troupe re- 
turning to town next week. The show 
failed to prove the money-getter ex- 
pected and Brady decided to call it in. 

Mizzi Hajos was a passenger on the 
Prinz Frederich Wilhelm which ar- 
rived this week. Werba & Luescher 
plan to star the little Hungarian pri- 
ma donna in the musical version of 
"Such a Little Queen" by Rennold 
Wolf and Channing Pollock. 



Owing to the continued illness of 
Nellie McCoy, her role with the Kitty 
Gordon show is being played by May- 
me Gehrue. Miss McCoy is slated to 
be a forthcoming star in "The Danc- 
ing Princess" which Jos. M. Gaites 
will produce later in the season. 



Congressman William Sulzer, the 

Democratic nominee for governor of 
New York State, is announced as the 
principal speaker at a big meeting of 
theatrical people at the Hippodrome, 
Oct. 27, under the auspices of the Wil- 
son & Marshall Theatrical League. 

Bobby Winstanley will have a benefit 
at Summer Hall, East Boston, Oct. 18. 
Mr. Winstanley, a clog dancer, lost his 
eyesight some years ago. The benefit 
is to supply the cost of an operation. 
His address is 174 Cowper street, East 
Boston, Mass. 



Another picture house will shortly 
be completed in Harlem. Felix Isman 
has begun the Taction of a tax-pay- 
ing edifice at 106th street and Fifth 
avenue, which will have one balcony 
and is intended to house pop vaude- 
ville. The plot is 100x125. 



The Chadwick Trio left the Union 
Square bill after the Monday night 
show, Mrs. Chadwick claiming to have 
sprained her leg. The accident hap- 
pened shortly after the trio had been 
requested to take a position one spot 
earlier on the program. 



Vardon & Wilbur sailed for the 
other side last Saturday, having 
reached New York following a trip 
nearly around the world. It included 
several weeks spent by the act (Var- 
don, Perry and Wilbur) in South Af- 
rica. 



Ned Finley, who has just left "The 
Trail of the Lonesome Pine," to be 
featured in a big scenic act on the S.- 
C.-Loew circuits, returned home Tues- 
day night after visiting friends, to 
find that burglars had cleaned out his 
flat of everything of value, excepting 
a Panama hat. 

Edward L. Moore, head of the 
Moore Circuit of southern and middle- 
west theatres, was in New York last 
week. His new theatre in Clarksburg, 
W. Va., will be ready for occupancy 
early in January. This house, seat- 
ing 1,200, is replacing the legitimate 
theatre, destroyed by fire two years 
ago. 



CABARET NEWS 

Kathryn Andrews, formerly with 
"Hanky Panky," is in the Cabaret at 
the States'. 

Jack Clifford and Irene Weston may 
become a team again. Miss Weston 
suffered serious injury not long ago. 

Matt Silvey, manager of the cabaret 
show at the Reno Cafe, will handle the 
acts for the Pekin restaurant when 
completed. 

Betty Morgan and Evelyn Keller 
have returned from Frisco. Miss Mor- 
gan will join Morgan, Bailey and Mor- 
gan, vaudeville. 

The former Cafe Madrid is being 
torn apart and put together again for 
a Child's restaurant. It is situated 
under the present club rooms of the 
White Rats. 

Minnie Don San and Harry Haw, 
Chinese Texas Tommy dancers, have 
been placed under a ten years' contract 
by F. Clarenz Rivers. They will be 
featured next week at the Chinese cab- 
aret at the new Port Arthur cafe in 
Chinatown. 

Macy's had a Cabaret last week. A 
stage had been set up in the restaurant 
of the department store, and from 2.30 
until 4 o'clock the "perfect 36" models 
paraded back and forth before the 
shoppers at luncheon, in the newest 
importations from Paris. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
The Planters Cafe under the Colum- 
bia opened Oct. 5 with a big banquet 
and Cabaret. The regular orchestra 
under Paul Biese was assisted by a 
specially engaged women's orchestra, 
the Temple Quartet and other enter- 
tainers. 

Millie De Leon, also known as "The 
Girl in Blue," played a single, sole, 
solitary engagement in the cabaret 
show of the Folies Bergere last Sat- 
urday night. The Folies is a most 
polite establishment. Before Millie 
went on, her hooking agent took her 
aside and cautioned her that she must 
behave. Then the restaurant manager 
added his word of advice. Finally the 
orchestra leader told Millie to be dis- 
creet. Millie said she would be the 
most polite little dancer the Folies 
Bergere had ever seen. Then Millie 
began to dance. The booking agent 
has been apologizing to the restaurant 
people ever since. 



Chicago, Oct. 9. 
A regular big-time Cabaret show was 
installed in Rector's Cafe last week, 
with Mike Bernard topping the list 
The show runs two hours nightly be- 
tween 11 P. M. and 1 A. M. Lee 
Kraus has arranged for an eigh- 
teen-week engagement of Madam Pat- 
ricola, her soprano singer, Mme. Kap- 
lan, and her six-piece Italian orchestra 
at the cafe. Patricola's salary is $600 
net each week. The North Side singer 
was practically booked solid in the 
small time vaudeville houses here- 
abouts. Kraus cancelled all the vaude- 
ville time to accept the Rector engage- 
ment. 



VARIETY 



19 




STOCK 



LIVED UP TO TITLE. 

Grand Rapids, Oct. 9. 

The Empire stock company has pre- 
sented "The Crimson Circle." While 
interesting, it contained lines and sit- 
uations that closely approached the 
risque. 

The company, consisting of W. R. 
Todd, Francis Kelly, Joie Canada, 
Misses Teal, Marsden and Messrs. Ru 
Shaw, Starr, Haines, Woods and Riggs, 
has made a most favorable impression. 
Western plays have been presented in 
succession of late. 



TORONTO'S PERMANENT HOUSE. 

Toronto, Oct. 9. 
William H. Barwald, stage director 
at the Colonial Stock Co., at Ottawa, 
which closed last week, has been re- 
engaged by the management, to place 
permanent stock in a new theatre to be 
built here for that purpose. 



RECORD IN LEADING WOMEN. 

Lawrence, Mass., Oct. 9. 
The Malley-Dennison Stock Com- 
pany is establishing a new record in 
changing leading women. The season 
has hardly started and Claudius Lucas, 
Phyllis Gilmore and Helen Terry have 
appeared. Miss Terry was loaned to 
the Lawrence company by the St. 
James, Boston. 



LYTELL'S COAST ENGAGEMENT. 

George Davis, general manager of 
the Alcazar stock, San Francisco, in 
New York for the past month, returned 
last week to the Coast. 

Bert Lytell is announced as a ten 
weeks' fixture at the Alcazar this win- 
ter. 



HORNE*S PRINCIPALS. 

Erie, Pa., Oct. 9. 
Home's stock company has been in- 
stalled at the Park Opera House for 
the winter. The company, headed by 
W. O. McWatters, includes Joseph La 
Valleire, Alvah Simms, Alice Bolton, 
Carl Adamson, Fred K. Lanham, Lu- 
cille La Valliere, Baby Josephine, 
Thomas Brower, Lester Howard, Mar- 
gie Dow, Alice Clements. 



LONG OFFICE RUN. 

While shows have long runs occa- 
sionally, Mrs. Helen Avery Hardy lays 
claim to an office run. She is now 
filling her 108th consecutive week in 
the Paul Scott agency. 



HAINES COMES BACK. 

Robert T. Haines ceased to be a 
stock leading man in Boston Satur- 
day last. His services are now offered 
to the vaudeville managers. He may 
reappear in "The Coward" within a 
week or two. 



BACK IN THE WARBURTON. 

Yonkers, N. Y., Oct. 9. 

Carl Hunt, formerly identified with 

the Corse Payton executive forces, is 

managing the Warburton. This week 

he arranged for stock to open here Oct. 
21. 



$40,000 RAISED FOR MARLOWE. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 

It is reported from the Marlowe the- 
atre this week that $40,000 has been 
raised, and the Marlowe Players will 
remain at that house. 

Sanford McKnight is the president 
of the Marlowe Theatre Co., in 
charge. 

The company is preparing to appear 
at the Fine Arts theatre later in the 
season in performances of "Maternity." 



BURNS* COMPANY. 

Paul Burns is in New York organiz- 
ing a stock company which he intends 
to plant in Hart's, Philadelphia, for 
an anticipated winter stay. 

This house started the season as a 
spoke in the Weber pop circuit. Lack 
of patronage forced it to withdraw. 



KEITH REDUCES PRICES. 

B. F. Keith's Harlem Opera House, 
with its new stock company, has 
found it expedient to reduce the prices 
of admission. 

Hereafter the prices will be 10-25 
at matinees and 15-50 evenings. 



DEDYNE CO. OPENS. 

Hoboken, Oct. 9. 

Severin Dedyne and his Associated 
Players installed winter stock at the 
Gayety Monday in "Checkers." 

Dedyne and Enid May Jackson 
played the leads. 



PLAYED ON SHORT NOTICE. 

Boston, Oct. 9. 
Manager Gulesian, of the St. James' 
stock, loaned Ethel Gray Terry to the 
Malley-Denison stock, Lawrence, for 
the latter's production of "Madame 
X." Miss Terry hurried to Lawrence 
and jumped in the principal role with 
twenty-four hours' notice, playing it 
without a slip-up. 



SOCIETY GIRL JOINS. 

Lafayette, Ind., Oct. 9. 
Georgianna Jones, a Lafayette so- 
ciety girl, whose work with the local 
dramatic society attracted attention, 
has joined the Otis-Oliver stock com- 
pany, which recently played here at 
the Family. 



CAMPBELL STRATTON PLAYERS. 

Nathan Appell is framing a stock 
organization to be known as the Camp- 
bell Stratton Players. 

Mr. Stratton will head the company. 
A route has been fixed by Appell. 



BUNTING CO. IN FORSYTH. 

Atlanta, Oct. 9. 
After a year's absence from Atlanta, 
Emma Bunting and her stock players 
returned to spend the winter at the 
Forsyth. This house has been dark 
for two weeks after playing Keith 
vaudeville for the past season. The 
variety bills have been shifted to the 
Grand. 



OBITUARY 



Boston, Oct. 9. 
Louis Burkhardt, connected with the 
advertising department of the Hollis 
Street, Colonial, Park, Tremont and 
Boston theatres for more than twenty 
years, died Oct. 3 at his home, 14 High- 
land Street^ Roxbury. He had been ill 
since last March. He was a half 
brother to William Harris. He is sur- 
vived by a widow and five children. 
One of his sons is Grover Burkhardt, 
the treasurer of the Park theatre. 



Boston, Oct. 9. 
Bernard Donnelly, a member of John 
Donnelly & Sons Bill Posting Com- 
pany, dropped dead in New York last 
Thursday morning. He had been stop- 
ping at the Hotel Marlboro. Just be- 
fore he stepped from the hotel to the 
sidewalk, he complained of a pain in 
his side, then fell to the street uncon- 
scious. An ambulance was summoned, 
but he was dead before it reached the 
hospital. 



J. M. Hill, twenty years ago one of 
the most prominent theatrical man- 
agers in the United States, died Oct. 
2 at St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 
after a brief illness. He lived at 97 
West 163d street. Some fifteen years 
ago he retired from the theatrical 
business and interested himself in 
mining. The deceased was 65 years 
old. 

Paul Richmond Kent, aged 3 years, 
and Eleanor Gaynor Kent, aged 1 
year, son and daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richmond Kent (known in vau- 
deville as Kent and Wilson), were 
buried together at Kirksville, Mo., 
Sept. 29. 



Philadelphia, Oct. 9. 

Thomas J. Ryan, who with Charles 
P. Donnelly has been the leader of 
the Democratic party in this city for 
the past twenty-five years, committed 
suicide at his office in the Land Title 
Building in this city last Sunday af- 
ternoon, by shooting himself in the 
head. 

Ryan had many theatrical and 
amusement interests throughout the 
country. The deceased left no letter 
or note of any kind referring to his 
act. About 500 letters remained on 
his desk untouched. His death was a 
great shock. 

INDIANA MAY NOT REOPEN. 

South Bend, Ind., Oct. 9. 
Unable to make stock pay, the In- 
diana theatre is again dark. A wealthy 
local man put money in the venture. 
The Indiana may never reopen as it is 
reported it will be transformed into 
a department store. The house was 
once the leading theatre of the city. 



ITALIAN STOCK OPENS. 

New Orleans, Oct. 9. 
The Maori Italian Dramatic Co. 
opens an indefinite cn^a^ement at the 
Majestic tomorrow. The company wiil 
offer a repertoire of drama-, and trag- 
edies in Italian. New Y«>rk City is 
the goal of the company. 



San Francisco, Oct. 9. 
Driven insane by his infatuation for 
Mabel Foy, a vaudeville actress, Mur- 
ray Steele, San Francisco manager for 
the Kinemacolor Motion Picture Com- 
pany, ended his life on the night of 
Sept 29 by swallowing cyanide of 
potassium. Steele had asked Miss Foy 
to marry him. She had refused. The 
morning of the day Steele committed 
suicide Miss Foy received a bunch of 
white roses and a note signed by 
Steele which read: "I am going to 
the park, sweetheart." A few hours 
later his body was found near Golden 
Gate park entrance. 



Mri. B. C. Hart, wife of the vaude- 
ville agent, died Oct. 7 in River Crest 
Sanitarium. She had been ill for near- 
ly a year. Mrs. Hart, during her stage 
career, was known as Amelia Dean, 
being a member of Hart's Theatre 
Comique stock company when they 
were married. A daughter, Lillie Dean 
Hart, and the husband survive. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
Frank M. Rice died at his home in 
this city Oct. 4. He is survived by 
a wife, mother and brother. 



Washington, Oct. 9. 
Eugene Kernan, aged 79 years, died 
Oct. 4 at George Washington Univer- 
sity Hospital. He joined the navy 
when real young, entering the show 
business in 1865. In 1872 he and Matt 
Morgan were connected with a "living 
statue" show, the first of its kind in 
America. He was identified with va- 
rious theatrical enterprises, coming 
here twenty-six years ago. The Ly- 
ceum, generally known as Kernan's 
theatre, was owned by his brother, 
James. When the latter sold out to 
the Empire Circuit six years ago, Eu- 
gene Kernan was retained as man- 
ager. An invalid widow survives. 



Mrs. A. H. Douglas, mother of 
Blanche Douglas (leading woman, 
Poli's stock Wilkes-Barre), died Sept. 
23, at San Francisco. 

Cincinnati, Oct. 9. 
Frank Wright, formerly conected 
with the Robinson Circus, died at his 
home on Monmeith avenue, Hyde 
Park, of cancer of the stomach. He is 
survived by a widow, one son and a 
daughter. 

CLOSED DOWN SUDDENLY. 

Schenectady, N. Y., Oct. 9. 

After two weeks of poor business 
and the failure of the Connelly Bros, 
of Elmiro, N. Y., to further finance 
the company, the Mohawk Players 
closed suddenly Oct. 7. 

The company had reported for a 
performance of "The Dawn of a To- 
morrow" when the blow came. The 
audience was dismissed. No blame 
is attached to Manager (iill of the Mo- 
hawk, who fulfilled his part of the con- 
tract. "William David and Virginia 
Milliinan headed tin company. 



William H .-'• i will ;•**•■ *i ' 1 t-> 'lie pub 
licity work U| mi a!l <>f •!;.■ \W).. t Ai- KiHil-. 
I.«-w" l'i"lrlH and Jo \\ '< '• < : |.m;"T ; |i'*>. 



%) 



VARIETY 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 



Initial Presentation, First Appearance 

ar Reappearance la or Aroaad 

Naw York 

Rachel Lowe, Fifth Ave. 

Bessie Clifford, Fifth Ave. 

Arnold Daly and Co. (New Act), 
Hammerstein's. 

Rosa Valerno Troupe, Hammerstein'.-. 
Ada Reeve, Colonial. 

"The Girl," Union Sq. 

"Who's Brown?" Alhambra. 

Nellie Waring, Bronx. 

Billie Reeves. 

"A Lesson in Temperance" (Comedy). 

17 Mins.; Three; Full Stage. 

Fifth Ave. 

Billie Reeves, the original "drunk" 
in the "Music Hall" act and later for 
three years with the Ziegfeld "Follies" 
returns to Broadway with a one-man 
pantomime that bids fair to send Billie's 
stock a-soaring a few more pegs sky- 
ward. The act is being done in Eng- 
land and is the property of Solo, from 
whom the rights for the European con- 
tinent and America were secured by Mr. 
Reeves. The opening scene shows the 
exit of a booze parlor and the entrance 
of the Drunk's home. Reeves appeared 
at the exit and was immediately recog- 
nized by the audience, although wear- 
ing a gray moustache as part of his 
makeup. In high hat and evening 
clothes covered by a top coat, from the 
pocket of which protrudes the head of 
a duck, he staggers across the stage to 
his residence. He breathes upon a 
lamppost and it immediately moves 
away. The duck keeps up a constant 
squawking. Every attempt of the drunk 
to hit it with his cane carries him off 
his balance. A funny bit is the moving 
about of the keyhole all over the door 
when the drunk attempts to let him- 
self in. Once on the inside everything 
turns about. The pictures move, the 
bed is a revolving table, the telephone 
and clock have concealed springs. 
There are a hundred and one laugh- 
able props. It is a very difficult act 
to handle and must require the services 
of at least three men behind the 
scenes. Monday the props' worked 
only fairly well, and still there was 
enough to interest and bring laughs. 
With everything working smoothly it 
will make a capital comedy number 
somewhat out of the ordinary. Billie 
Reeves, of course, goes a long way to- 
ward making the offering a success. 
He is always in the role of "The 
Drunk," and although not falling about 
as much as formerly his work is as 
effective. Closing the show at the Fifth 
Avenue, the act did not lose a cus- 
tomer. Dash*. 



Sterling and Hut ton. 
Singing and Dancing. 
14 Mins.; Two. 
City. 

Could readily work in "one." Open 
as a "sister act," but it is easily dis- 
cerned the larger of the two is a male, 
(lirl does a kid song in rompers, man 
changes to bathing suit doing the 
Gibson Girl" song used by Julian El- 
tinge years ago, pulling off his wig at 
conclusion; girl does another kid song 
while man changes to male attire. Fin- 
ish with a song and dance. Not a big 
time turn. Jolo. 



McMahon, Diamond and Clemence. 

Songs and Dances. 

13 Mins.; One. Three, One. 

Bronx. 

McMahon, Diamond and Clemence 
on their appearance suggest a small 
time act, and this impression is main- 
tained until after the first number. It 
is the "scarecrow" work of Helen Mc- 
Mahon, who did the bit with a bur- 
lesque show and with Ziegfeld's "Fol- 
lies" that gave the turn its shove 
toward the big time. There has never 
been a better bit seen of its kind than 
the limp >work of Miss McMahon's. 
Vaudeville likes it. Maurice Diamond 
has a chance to show some very good 
mixed dancing that also helps. These 
two incidents are strong enough to 
hold the turn on the big time in a 
position of about the same importance 
as that at the Bronx this week, "No. 
2." The opening and finish should 
both be altered. Ida Clemence is a lit- 
tle girl with a fairly good voice, but 
cannot dance. Dressing is needed 
badly, and there is a lack of finish 
which may be remedied with working, 
but the trio should not stop trying 
simply because they are playing the 
bigger houses. They have a long 
way to go yet. An enthusiastic audi- 
ence at the Bronx received the turn 
very nicely. D*ah. 



Frank A. Mullane. 

Monolog. 

15 Mins.; One. 

Hammerstein's. 

Frank A. Mullane has been playing 
about in local clubs. He makes his 
first important showing at Hammer- 
stein's this week, billed as "the Irish- 
American Hebrew." As an Irishman 
he recalls Frank Fogarty in appear- 
ance and as a Hebrew he suggests 
something of Frank Bush, although he 
uses none of the material of either. 
He did only fairly. Delivering his 
stories smoothly and easily, his talk 
has not the "kick" that the super-wise 
42d street audience demands. One or 
two of the yarns missed fire entirely. 
He sings for a starter and once again 
at the finish. He has a voice of only 
mediocre quality, and did only passably 
in "No. 7," an important position, just 
preceding the headliner (Edna Good- 
rich). Miss Goodrich had undoubtedly 
drawn in a good proportion of the au- 
dience, and perhaps their impatience to 
see the feature of the show acted 
against interest in the monologist. 

Rush. 



Close Brothers. 

Acrobatic. 

9 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Hammerstein's. 

Close Brothers furnish a clean spe- 
cialty, involving several unusual feats 
in hand-to-hand work. They dress !n 
trim suits of tights and make a capital 
appearance. The hand-to-hand routine 
is varied with a bit of well-managed 
pedal juggling, the top mounter serv- 
ing as the object. A high pedestal *'s 
rigged at the right of the stage and 
this is employed in several splendid 
leaps by the top mounter, who lands in 
hand-stands. Closing the show on a 
long bill, the acrobats were interesting. 

Rush. 



Gladys Vanct. 

Songs. 

17 Mins.; One. 

Fifth Ave. 

Gladys Vance is not unknown to 
vaudeville hereabouts but this is her 
first big time showing in New York. 
If she does not show again on big 
time the person who allowed her to use 
a "Dope" number to close with may be 
held responsible. Why a thing of that 
sort should be allowed on any stage 
is beyond imagination. The girl an- 
nounces that she will sing a song writ- 
ten by a reformed dope fiend and then 
proceeds to describe the effects of the 
drug, going into various fits of raving 
about home and mother during the tell- 
ing. A pretty little thing! Something 
for the women and children to enjoy! 
There is another reason to omit the 
"Dope" song. Miss Vance's act was 
quite finished with the "mirror-dress" 
number, an idea by the way taken from 
Mindel Kingston (World and Kings- 
ton), who first introduced it here some 
three years ago. This was really what 
got the singer over, and she should not 
attempt to go further, for the mirror 
effects are much stronger than she is. 
The first two numbers were character. 
In dressing also the girl will have to 
be fully equipped before she can ex- 
pect to compete with the big time sin- 
gles or small time, either. The kind of 
work she is doing does not need elab- 
orate dressing, but it does need care- 
ful attention. Gladys Vance may be 
able to frame up a single that will 
keep her on the big time but it will 
have to be arranged differently from 
the present routine. Taking away the 
Mindel Kingston mirror dress, she has 
very little to pass her along, and if 
she is to depend solely upon the mir- 
rors, Miss Vance is in a bad way, for 
if a manager wants the same effect all 
he has to do is get one of the Mindel 
Kingston mirror-dresses and put his 
illustrated song singer under the spot 
in it. Dusty 



Hal Davis and Co. (5). 

"The Money Getter" (Farce). 

20 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 

Hammerstein's. 

Hal Davis' new vehicle is denomi- 
nated "An absolute farce comedy." The 
emphasis is on the farce. Searl Allen, 
who wrote the sketch, is in the position 
of a boy whipping a top to make it 
spin. The farcical situation is wound 
up rapidly and kept moving swiftly in 
complications concerning Jack Stock- 
ton (Mr. Davis), the hard-headed old 
executor of his father's will, and mis- 
understandings as to which girl Jack 
is to marry. The sketch follows Mr. 
Allen's usual form of fast patter and 
quick exits and entrances of the char- 
acters. The Hammerstein audience re- 
ceived it mildly. Rush. 



Keefe and Johnson. 

"Piano Act." 

10 Mins.; One. 

125th Street Music Hall (Oct. 6). 

Keefe and Johnson offer songs, with 
the bigger chap at the ivories. The 
taller man has a good voice, of high 
range, but of nasal tone. The piano 
boy sings well and the two get de- 
cent harmony out of their popular 
stuff. Good big small time act. The 
men went over with big results at the 
Sunday showing. Mark. 



NEW SHOWS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Preeeatatlon of Legitimate 

Attractions la Naw York 

Theatres. 

"Little Women," Playhouse (Oct 
14). 

"The 'Affairs' of Anatol," Little 
(Oct. 14). 

"A Rich Man's Son," Harris (Oct 
IS). 

"The Daughter of Heaven," Cen- 
tury (Oct 12). 
-The New Sin," Wallacks (Oct. 15). 

Diamond and Brennan. 

"Nifty Nonsense" (Songs and Dances). 

19 Mins.; One. 

Colonial. 

Jim Diamond will have to be seen 
to note the great improvement in his 
stage work as a singer, dancer and 
comedian. Mr. Diamond has gained 
repose. With his latest partner, Sy- 
bil Brennan, the loose-jointed fellow 
is dancing as well as ever, singing 
"Somebody Else is Getting It," with 
an extra verse or two (making the 
song topical) and playing nicely to 
Miss Brennan. She looked like a glit- 
tering star when dividing the two 
Klein Brothers on the stage. In the 
trio's "Colon Town" song, no one else 
could be noticed. With Diamond, the 
young woman is not yet showing up 
as strongly. Maybe she lacks 
what Diamond has gained. Further 
playing of the lately formed team will 
help. Dressed well in two gowns (a 
pink at the opening, later changing 
to a green dress), Miss Brennan, al- 
ways a pretty girl, somehow did not 
bring out her good looks. Neither is 
her voice as healthy it seemed as when 
with the "Dutch" comedians, so Miss 
Brennan may be said to have been 
nervous at the Colonial opening. 
Nevertheless, she ably becomes Mr. 
Diamond's assistant in place of Clara 
Nelson. Miss Brennan sang "The 
Garden of Yesterday" as a solo. An 
other number might be better suited 
to her. "You're My Baby" and "Rag- 
time Soldier Man" (for an encore) 
were used as duets, the kissing business 
in the former being retained. The act 
walked off with the hit honors of the 
program at the Colonial, opening the 
second half, the hardest position that 
they could have had. Sime. 



Alice Hanson. 
Singing Comedienne. 
19 Mins.; One. 
American Roof. .,.-.*• 

Alice Hanson is offering a first-rate 
set of broad comedy character num- 
bers. On a very quiet bill she was the 
undoubted hit. Her songs run to ro- 
bust cutnedy, each number involving 
a change of costume. They were, 
"I'm a Regular Human Being," "Fight- 
ing Bess," "The White Hopess," and a 
corking finale, in which a dwarf is 
made the means of highly effective 
burlesque. The audience laughed it- 
self weak at the last number Tuesday 
night. The bill was short on comedy, 
and Alice, next to closing, gave them 
what they wanted. Hers is an ambi- 
tious effort for the smaller time. It 
should have a decidedly good chance 
in the more important houses. 

Rush. 



VARIETY 



21 



Jesse Lasky Co. (11). 

"In the Barracks" (Operetta). 

36 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 

Orpheum. 

"In the Barracks" stars Fritz Sturm- 
fels in the role intended to be the most 
important. But somehow or other 
Sturmfels, seen in New York recently 
at the Casino as principal tenor in the 
ill-fated "Baron Trenck," can only lay 
claim to third place for work per- 
formed. -First comes Myles McCarthy 
in a delicious comedy role, and second, 
Nellie Brewster, soprano. Sturmfels, a 
Viennese, is still heavily handicapped 
by his foreign dialect. He cannot hope 
to accomplish much until he has cor- 
rected this. Even then he's no world- 
beater as a tenor. Miss Brewster, on 
the contrary, is a genuinely good singer 
and an excellent actress. The comedy 
role would stand out no matter who 
played it, and in the hands of so ex- 
perienced an actor as McCarthy, is a 
riot. It is so good, in fact, that the 
part could be elaborated and the story 
of the operetta somewhat altered and 
the whole thing made into a rip-snort- 
ing stellar role for a comedian like 
Sam Bernard. The book is by Cecil 
DeMille, lyrics by Grant Stewart, mu- 
sic by Robert Hood Bowers. When the 
book is "legitimate" it is as inconsis- 
tently melodramatic as a dime novel, 
when for comedy, it stoops to low com- 
edy of the farcical variety, and becomes 
equally inconsistent. A prince of the 
royal blood is in love with an Amer- 
ican girl. He is being decorated with 
the Iron Cross for bravery in saving 
the life of his emperor. His Majesty, 
hearing of his infatuation for the 
American girl, commands him to marry 
the Princess Cophia. Prince throws 
down his decoration and says: "To 

with the emperor. I wish I hadn't 

saved him." This in barracks, sur- 
rounded by soldiers and his general 
(he holds the rank of captain). Instead 
of being killed on the spot he is mildly 
accused of lese majeste, and told to con- 
sider himself under arrest. Meanwhile, 
the American girl's chauffeur, a slangy 
New Yorker, goes off and calls up on 
phone, impersonating the arrested 
man's cousin, a prince of rank, high in 
favor with the emperor, saying he is 
on his way to the barracks with word 
from the emperor. Inconsistently, no 
one has ever seen him, and he comes 
on in military uniform and proceeds 
to swashbuckle things. After a lot of 
comedy — and song — he declares that it 
is His Majesty's orders that the pun- 
ishment be banishment to America for 
three years. As the curtain goes down 
they depart for the "land of the free," 
tarrying long enough, however, for the 
finale. In addition to the three prin- 
cipals, there are eight other men, six 
of whom speak no lines, merely join- 
ing in the singing and making the stage 
picture. A pretentious offering for 
vaudeville that doesn't quite reach. 

Jolo. 



Franklin Bros. 
Blackface Comedians. 
14 Mins.; One. 
Grand O. H. (Oct. 6). 

Two men in blackface wear evening 
dress suits. They start with every 
promise of a good act, but when they 
resort to ancient "gags," they go way 
back Jolo. 



Blake and Amber. 

Travesty. 

14 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Fifth Avenue. 

Blake and Amber are playing under 
the billing this week of "First Ameri- 
can Appearance." Perhaps it is the 
couple's first New York appearance in 
vaudeville, or possibly first American 
vaudeville appearance, but they hail 
from San Francisco, where in the old 
days of musical stock they were big 
favorites. They have been on the move 
for the past eight years playing in ill 
countries but their own. The specialty 
runs along lines of earlier vaudeville, 
but is none the less enjoyable. Both 
make a bully appearance, running 
along in the sixfoot class. The spe- 
cialty revolves around a song which 
tells of the various ways in which to 
get the money in vaudeville. This allows 
them to travesty the magician, grand 
opera singing acts, quick change artist, 
etc. Props are used freely and several 
funny effects secured. Blake and Am- 
ber have a big advantage in possessing 
good singing voices, so good, in fact, 
one straight number might easily be 
sandwiched in. The Fifth Avenue au- 
dience gave the couple a nice recep- 
tion, although they were placed down 
rather far, having some strong comedy 
to follow. DftshK 



Carl Demarest. 

Violinist 

10 Mins.; One. 

Fifth Avenue. 

Carl Demarest is a cross between 
Rinaldo and Frank Whitman. In make- 
up and style of working he has copied 
Rinaldo very closely, although he lacks 
Rinaldo's showmanship and personality, 
and his attempts to follow the rag- 
playing are not highly successful. Fin- 
ishing with Rinaldo, he goes to Frank 
Whitman's dancing and playing at the 
same time. He might have at least 
used a different air from Whitman's. 
Where Rinaldo or Whitman is familiar, 
Demarest will have trouble getting 
over. Dasft 



New Ads in "Pop" Houses 

Morris and Karno. 

Comedy Acrobatic Pantomimists. 

9 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Grand O. H. (Oct. 6). 

A novelty for the big small time 
and, if better played, should prove a 
knockout on the two-a-day circuits. 
A kilted soldier parading before sen- 
try box. Frock-coated "souse" comes 
on, is shot by sentry, who puts body 
in bag; encounters all sorts of comedy 
difficulty with the handling of the 
"corpse," which wriggles itself into 
ludicrous positions. "Corpse" runs off, 
leaving bag empty, to the dismay of 
sentry. Re-enters as a bear, a comedy 
battle with the animal, sentry box is 
overturned with bear inside, sentry 
sits on box gloating over his capture, 
bear grabs him by leg and drags him 
inside, lights are lowered a moment, 
and bear emerges rubbing his "tum- 
my" showing only clothes remaining 
of the sentry. Bear walks off. Lights 
up showing sentry seated in his box 
fast asleep. A dream. The idea and 
pantomimic comedy strongly suggests 
foreign origin. Jolo. 



Egyptian Princess. 

Harpist. 

15 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Setting; 

Exterior). 

After the Egyptian Princess and her 
retinue of stage attendants get into 
full view one must readily admit that 
it takes more than money sometimes to 
put over a vaudeville act. If the young 
woman doing the Egyptian Princess 
thing wants her audiences to believe 
that she hails from the regions of the 
river Nile she will have to come 
stronger than she does with three ne- 
groes and three dark female assistants. 
The stage is set like a production or 
musical comedy first act. It's very 
Oreintish with a drop showing the 
pyramids and desert in the rear. Into 
view is propelled the Princess and her 
retinue in a huge gondola. The Prin- 
cess is killing time playing a harp. The 
Princess sings and plays. She sings 
only once. The blacks do a little 
hop, step and jump around the stage, 
and one of the girls does a dance she 
shouldn't. The girl dances badly and 
inartistically. For an act with a pretty 
stage setting the Egyptian Princess 
has something the pop houses have 
been waiting for. She dresses well and 
no doubt means well, but to advance 
in her present venture Princey must 
get some stage accessories of the hu- 
man type that can do something. 

Mark. 



Dyer and Faye. 
Songs and Crossfire. 
IS Mins.; One. 
Grand O. H. (Oct. 6). 

Two men of youthful appearance 
with very bright crossfire kidding talk 
that leads up to a burlesque drama 
bit that, old as is the idea, is de- 
veloped along somewhat different lines. 
In their efforts to be as original as 
possible they overstep a bit by not 
quitting with the travesty, but return 
for a "unique" finish which, good as 
it may sound in the telling, some- 
how doesn't "act out." They return 
in response to the appreciative ap- 
plause for their previous efforts and 
commence to sing a duet. A man 
walks on, announces lie is from the 
insane asylum and proceeds to "take 
them back." It will take very little 
to project these young men across the 
border line to the two-a-day, if in- 
deed they have not already enjoyed 
some of the sweets of vaudeville's 
Elysium. Jolo. 



Four Dixie Girls. 

Songs and Dances. 

16 Mins.; Two (Exterior). 

Four colored girls offer a singing 
and dancing turn. The girls work hard 
enough but for some reason they 
failed to make the impression desired 
at the 86th Street house. They don't 
seem to be together witli their voices. 
They got the most attention with the 
"St. Vitus Rag" ni nber. None of the 
quartet shows unusual dancing ability. 
( )ne girl has a good voice and a solo 
by her would help. The act needs 
new songs more than anything else, 
although dancing for the finish would 
also enhance its value. The girls have 
overlooked some of the hi-: topical 
song hits. A small time act at its 
best. Mark. 



Franklin and Hall. 
"A Story of the West" (Dramatic). 
13 Mins.; Three (Cabin Interior; Spe- 
cial). 

A good, snappy little act. First half 
much stronger than the close. Dia- 
log, sharp and witty, between a wound- 
ed gambler and a miner's little girl. 
The card shark reaches the cabin in 
a storm, and obtains temporary shel- 
ter from the girl. She pokes a lot 
of fun at him. She tells him wjjat a 
good man her daddy is. (He never gam- 
bles.) She is hurt when she learns his 
identity. Skipping out to find daddy, 
the gambler discovers that the man 
he has just cleaned at cards is the 
girl's father. After a long soliloquy, 
he drops a bag of coin into her father's 
coat on the wall. As he is about to 
exit, the girl returns. She savs daddy 
is all broken up, having gambltd. She 
says he's bringing home a Ciristmas 
turkey anyway. Before the gambler 
leaves, she finds the bag. The gam- 
bler tells her it is dressing for the 
turkey. Ater the girl exits, the piece 
drops. Even on her return there is 
no strength to the closing. But the 
early exchange of repartee is bully. 
The woman is a capital ai-lrr.ss and 
makes her part stand out. The sketch 
will fit in on any pop bill. Marl. 



Eva Allen. 

Mind Reading. 

17 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 

125th St 

Most of the time is filled in by a 
"professor" who tells what Miss Allen 
has done and will do. Judging from 
her present performance Miss Allen is 
having an easy time. Not much effort 
has been made for comedy, although 
a few of her remarks brought laugh- 
ter. The "professor" remains by her 
side during the mind reading and calls 
sharply to the people to hold up their 
hands. In her present form of work- 
ing Miss Allen could use a few "plants" 
to good advantage. As some pretty 
good mind-reading acts have passed 
before Miss Allen should frame up a 
something away from the conventional 
routine. Mark. 



Helen Lorraine. 
Musical. 

10 Mins.; Full Stage (5); One (5). 
City. 

A dainty little girl appearing in ankle 
length dress, opens in full stage in 
semi-darkness with red glow, playing 
"My Hero" on cello. Follows with 
rag medley on violin, tripping across 
stage to the accompaniment of the 
fiddle. Changes to white satin knick- 
ers with braided military coat and hat, 
brings her violin to "one," seated on 
chair, plays "II Trovatore," popular 
medley, a bird imitation, etc. Enough 
dash about the turn to make it a de- 
sirable big small timer. Jolo. 



Abbott and Harris. 

Songs. 

10 Mins.; One. 

City. 

A classy looking man and woman, 
with good voices— for vaudeville -- 
singing more or less comedy dittus 
consisting of solos and duets, aug- 
mented by nice wardrobe. Nothing 
sufficiently distinctive to wan..: t clas- 
sifying it as anvthinir but ■■■■ ..1 i'. n |>j.r 
small time. JuU^ 



22 



VARIETY 



Percy Pollack and Co. (2). 

'The Gent With the Jimmy" (Comedy) 

18 Mine.; Three (Interior). 

"The Gent With the Jimmy" is one 
of the Roland West series of playlets 
which appear from time to time on 
♦ he American Roof. This new one will 
suffice to hold interest in the pop 
houses. There are three characters. 
A henpecked husband, rolling home 
with the milk wagons, enters by an 
open window through which a scrubby 
bearded burglar had previously crawled. 
The other character is the man's wife, 
of unusual avoirdupois, who, at the 
r;se of the curtain, says what she is 
going to do that shrimp of a husband 
of hers will be a-plenty. The burglar 
njistakes the house owner for the great 
Raffles and makes him a fifty-fifty 
partner on the job. The wife appears 
and is 'bound and gagged by the men. 
The husband finally sounds a burglar 
alarm and the wagon comes for Bill, 
tie real robber. Rather than take pun- 
ishment at his wife's hands, the hubby 
declares he's really Raffles and de- 
mands the protection of the police. 
Seme liberties are taken and there's 
a strain on the farcical strings, but 
it squeezed out hearty laughs. Fairly 
well played. Mark. 



Harrison Stewart and Dixie Picks (9). 
Singing and Dancing. 
22 Mint.; Full Stage (Special Interior). 
Academy of Music (Oct. 6). 

Harrison Stewart, colored, late of 
Stewart and Marshall, heads this new 
act. It is a simple schoolroom ar- 
rangement, with three small colored 
girls and five boys. The "picks" work 
excellently, especially in the fast danc- 
ing ensembles. The singing goes well 
enough, but there are slow moments 
in the talk. The showing at £he 
Academy was the first. Probably the 
newness of the act was responsible 
for the looseness of its playing. When 
cut five minutes or so, it should make 
a good light number for the big small 
time. Rush. 



m 



Dunbar and La Vere. 

Singing and Comedy. 

15 Mini.; One. 

Academy of Music (Oct. 6). 

Opening the show at the Academy 
Sunday after two reels of pictures, 
Dunbar and La Vere were unfortu- 
nately placed. The pair have a rather 
light singing and talking arrangement, 
the man playing a "Dutchman" and 
the girl working straight. The come- 
dian opens well enough with a song 
in a pleasing voice. Some of the talk 
missed fire Sunday afternoon. There 
is altogether too much of this. The 
singing was enjoyable. Dunbar's long 
recitation is scarcely worth while. 

Rush. 



Otloff Ors and Co. (1). 
Comedy Juggling. 
11 Mins.; Full Stage. 
86th Street. 

Ors works in tramp makeup with no 
attempt to do anything big in the jun- 
gling line. He can readily hold laugh- 
ing attention in the pop houses. He 
has some funny bits, although a few 
are carried by other jugglers who have 
beaten Ors to the footlights with them. 
Ors made epiite a hit at the 86th Street. 

Mark. 



Abe Marks and Co. (3). 

"The Girl, the Peddler and the 

Fighter" (Comedy). 
19 Mins.; Three (Interior). 
125th St 

Abe Marks, judging from the lobby 
display, prides himself on his prize ring 
ability. After seeing Abe act, he must 
be a fighter. A Hebrew peddler and 
his family (Abe, the fighter, and a 
daughter), have a family table discus- 
sion over prize fighting. The peddler 
says it's no business for his boy. Later 
Abe wins a great fight offstage and 
when $800 is handed the old man he 
says away with the peddling. For the 
close, the training quarters of the 
fighter are shown, with a punching bag 
used for comedy. It's small time stuff 
and all that, but as they like rough 
house and slapstick bits, the Marks act 
will be able to hand 'em a varied 
assortment. Mark. 



Lillian Buckingham and Co. (4). 

"The Stampede" (Dramatic). 

21 Mins.; Full Stage. (Special Set). 

City. 

Stage covered with set rocks, special 
western scenery, light effects, etc., all 
designed to give atmosphere to a "big 
act." Half breed, educated Indian girl, 
in love with mining engineer, he with 
her. Full-blooded "schooled" Indian, 
in love with girl. Engineer believes 
the girl is Spanish and that her Indian 
garb is merely a lark. Financial 
scheming enters largely into the plot. 
The sketch would be to two-a-day 
vaudeville what "The Fatal Wedding" 
was to "Under the Red Robe." 

Jolo. 



Five Merry Youngsters. 
"Dinkelspiel's Troublesome Scholars." 
20 Mins.; One. 

The Five Merry Youngsters offer 
nothing more than the old "school 
r.n m act" along new lines. By bunch- 
ing some good talent the producer has 
made a big improvement. At the 
American it worked in "one." The 
s*hoolroom setting was not missed, 
lor pop or big small time this act 
v ill fill in fifteen minutes. The extra 
t.me at the American was taken up 
*•» rendering "I'm the Guy" with the 
five boys doing well with the number. 
The act has some old bits, but in its 
entirety gives satisfaction. Mark. 



Jack Sheppard. 
Songs and Talk. 
9 Mins.; One. 

Jack Sheppard, judging from his 
talk and songs, has no new act, sav- 
ing a little verse in a song about the 
present political controversy. Shep- 
pard has several Marathonic songs 
which didn't make much of a hit at 
his Murray Hill showing. Sheppard 
needs new talk and new parodies. 

Mark. 



Friendly and Jordan. 

Songs and Dances. 

13 Mins.; Three (Interior). 

Friendly and Jordan showed on a 
bill topheavy with singing but fared 
pretty well notwithstanding. Between 
the vocal numbers the girls sand- 
wiched an ordinary toe dance. The 
man did well in a "Yiddish" number. 
The act belongs to the pop circuits. 

Mark. 



Rich and Lenore. 
Songs and Piano. 

17 Mins.; Three (Interior). 
Riverside. 

When Aubrey Rich and Ted Lenore 
framed up the act they evidently 
pounced upon some songs which were 
all the go at that time. Perhaps they 
practiced and rehearsed a long time 
as the numbers they used have almost 
become ancient around here now. The 
man works straight while the woman 
apparently strives for comedy by do- 
ing a bouncing specialty on the piano 
stool. Neither has much of a voice to 
speak of and both show a tendency 
on their duets to drag them out. The 
girl's Italian number didn't make much 
of a hit with the Riverside audience. 
As the act is typically small time, im- 
mediate attention should be given to 

the songs. Mark. 

Ames and Francis. 
Songs and Dances. 
16 Mins.; One. 
86th Street. 

A small time act with the man hold- 
ing it up through his dancing. The talk 
is poor and their voices barely pass. 
The "rag" finish is poorly worked up. 

Mark. 

Harry Layton and Co. 
Comedy Drama. 

18 Mins.; Full Stage. 

The vehicle has plenty of what pas- 
ses for "punch" in small time houses, 
and some effective comedy, but does 
unutterable violence to the dramatic 
conventions. There is action a-plenty 
and a laughing finale, and what small 
time audience demands more? There 
are quick changes by a gentleman 
crook who impersonates a police of- 
ficer, and this impressed itself upon 
the audience. The changes were well 
done. The number will go on the 
small time. It lacks finesse to raise 
it into the higher levels. Rush. 



Frank Sisters. 
Blackface "Sister Act." 
13 Mins.; One. 

Blackfaced "sister teams" are a n <\- 
elty on the pop time. The Fran-* sis- 
ters are getting along splendidly The/ 
work along the lines of the old min- 
strel duos and even go so far as to 
use some ancient material. The short- 
er and stouter of the two handles the 
comedy. She reels off some patter and 
cuts some didoes that will never get 
beyond the pop house pale. A dirty 
looking dog was used at the close to 
put over the old joke about the pup 
being an entomologist. The Frank 
Sisters could use some new material 
with better results. The girls do little 
singing. Mark. 



Florence Bowes. 

Songs. 

10 Mins.; One. 

Florence Bowes looks like a grad- 
uate of the Cabaret school. She's 
young, dresses well and displays a 
fairly good voice. Miss Bowes has 
several songs, new to the American, 
and that helped her score. She is a 
neat little entertainer. Opening she is 
in a white serge Norfolk outfit, 
changes to a green attire and for the 
finish wears a black spangled dress 
On a strong bill Miss Bowes was 
fairly well received, her closing num- 
ber with spicy lyrics booking her 
stock. Mar): 



Hardy Gibson, 
Monolog and Songs. 
11 Mins.; One. 
Grand O. H. (Oct. 6). 

"Singing souse" in approved English 
dress clothes and top coat enters car- 
rying under his arm a tailor's dum- 
my. Tells how he and his friend got 
into an altercation, his friend fell, he 
picked him up and ran. The "affair" 
occurred in front of a tailor shop. A 
unique idea for a monolog and songs 
but Gibson does not "go through" with 
the idea to a logical conclusion. In- 
stead, he tells a few poor jokes, takes 
his dummy off and returns to sing a 
couple of "blue" English ditties. 
Would pass nicely on big small time. 

Jolo. 



Hyde and Williams. 

Singing, Dancing, Instrumental 

10 Mins.; One. 

Rather classy looking man and wo- 
man. Open with a short duet, with 
just a bit of piano playing by the man. 
Woman sings "Robt. E. Lee" in an 
original style. Man does a "classic" 
solo on violin; then a "pop" medley 
to give woman opprtunity to change. 
His playing, however, is so listless and 
perfunctory that it doesn't hold the 
audience. Duet, "That Dramatic 
Rag." Woman then does a violent 
Russian dance while man plays the 
piano. During it her beautiful hair is 
permitted to fall about her and one is 
given flashes of dainty white lace un- 
derdressing. Man's crudity as a stage 
performer places the turn in the big 
small time category. Jolo. 



Densmore and Cantor. 
"Sister Act" 
10 Mins.; One. 

Two girls, one short and blonde, one 
tall and dark. After short opening duet, 
little one sings in eccentric manner, 
"Somebody Else is Getting It"; other 
enters stiltedly, sings (in very good 
voice) "Carita, My Own." Little one, 
Scotch comedy song and dance, then 
both finish with "Syncopated Boogey 
Man Rag." Here are a couple of fairly 
able girls, the little one with a good 
sense of comedy and the taller, darker 
and prettier one with a good voice (who 
might be utilized as a "feeder 1 '), going 
through the regulation routine with un- 
compromising adherence to the conven- 
tional. At present that makes the act 
merely a small timer. Jolo. 



"The Magic Cloak." 
17 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Drops). 
"The Magic Cloak" is designed to 
be one of those "quiet, artistic things," 
but it is decidedly not that in effect. 
The principals are unidentified. A man 
appears at the opening. He makes up 
to appear a hunchback, wearing a flow- 
ing robe. Three girls enter. He tells 
them if they put on the cloak their 
real natures will immediately become 
apparent. They do so, and in some 
incomprehensible way the process in- 
troduces each in a "spirit dance." The 
hunchback selects the best dancer as 
his bride, and then tells about it in a 
pleasing singing voice. The girls 
dance poorly. The sketch structure 
is nonsense and the whole makes most 
unsatisfactory material. It scored as 
near an absolute zero as anything that 
has bobbed up in the small time this 
long while. Rush. 



VARIETY 




THE CHARITY GIRL. 

It is really a great pity that 
experienced and astute theatrical man- 
agers like George W. Ledcrer, 
Charles B. Dillingham and William F. 
Connor, who comprise the George W. 
Lederer Production Co., should have 
been so short-sighted as to bring "The 

Charity Girl" into New York before it 
was ready for a metropolitan showing. 

At the close of the Chicago engage- 
ment the management went to work on 
the book in an endeavor to adapt it to 
New York requirements, but took 
scarcely long enough to accomplish the 
revision before coming into the Globe 
theatre (Oct. 2). 

"The Charity Girl" starts with 

one of the best first acts that ever 
belonged to a musical piece, strongly 
suggesting that classic "The Belle of 
New York." Inasmuch as Lederer was 
responsible for that huge success at 
the Casino and also in London, he can 
be accused of only plagiarising his own 
bits of stage business. In this first 
act there is developed an excellent 
plot that would seem to be sufficient 
for a serious drama. In the second 
act it oozes out to such an extent that 
in the third it is entirely forgotten and 
the show closes with a series of spe- 
cialties, with but a line or two spoken 
to introduce the turns. A fortnight 
hence and it will probably be an al- 
most new second and third-act piece. 

The production, scenically and sar- 
torially, is lavish to a degree of ex- 
travagance and a cast has been re- 
cruited that undoubtedly totals an enor- 
mous salary list. 

Ralph Hers is the principal comedian, 
resorting to his usual jerky manner- 
isms and rendering his songs in reci- 
tative fashion. He is a prime New 
York favorite and his efforts were high- 
ly appreciated. Ray Cox has the rather 
thankless role of a termagant wife, but 
got all there was out of it, scoring 
strongly with her aeroplane specialty. 
(She succeeded to Catherine Hayes' 
part.) Blossom Seeley's rendering of 
rag and other songs and dances showed 
her an experienced vaudevillian, which, 
while a help in that way, was a draw- 
back in the proper creation of her 
character role since she constantly ob- 
truded her own personality. Marie 
Flynn, a* small, frail-looking creature, 
played the title role. She may be best 
described as a "nasal ingenue," sug- 
gesting in appearance and voice tona- 
tion Mabel Taliaferro. The tenor lover 
was well played by C. Morton Home, 
who looks, walks and acts like Arnold 
Daly. Henry Fink was lost in a ju- 
venile Hebrew character role, though 
he struggled manfully to make his 
presence felt. D. L. Don* one of the 
old Casino comedians, had a small 
"comedy-heavy" part which he handles 
intelligently and Annabelle Whitford 
made a charming looking "villainess." 
The Marvelous Millers did their danc- 
ing specialty in the third act. 

Victor Hollaender's music is in it- 
self worth paying the price of a seat 
to hear. It is one of the most tuneful 
light opera scores New York has ever 
heard. 

A song sung by Blossom Seeley and 
universally condemned for its vulgar- 
ity was taken out after the first per- 
formance. Jolo. 



THE BRUTE. 

The moral of "The Brute" seems 
to be either "Don't live in a Harlem 
flat," or "Don't fall in love with a 
wealthy man if you're married." "The 
Brute" was first produced in New 
York Tuesday evening by Comstock 
& Gest at the 39th Street theatre. 
Monday night all concerned in the 
piece would have sold out cheap. It 
had been played for a night or two 
in the suburbs, without creating a fa- 
vorable impression among the man- 
agerial contingent. After the first act 
at the Comedy, its stock hit par, and 
at the finale it carried a premium. 

"The Brute" looks strong enough to 
live quite a while. It's a one-of-the-best- 
sellers novel tale. The author-drama- 
tist, Frederic Arnold Kummer, provid- 
ed one of the two hearty laughs of 
the evening (when he appeared after 
the second act in response to the 
clamorous applause) through his em- 
barrassment and ungainly height. 
The other big giggle was the honor- 
able but poor husband remarking to 
his wife's mother that a dose of chlor- 
oform for the mother-in-law should go 
with every marriage certificate. 

The remainder of the piece is seri- 
ous, following the book story quite 
closely. The play is much more in- 
teresting to those who have not read 
it between the covers of a novel. A 
young wife with a boy in a "Harlem 
flat," mostly noted for its noise in 
the steam pipes, becomes dissatisfied 
with life's lot, and falls in love 
with her husband's best friend. She 
did it while out automobile riding, 
one of the home pleasures denied her. 
The friend left for Denver to convert 
his properties into cash, returns and 
elope with the wife to the Orient. 
He died in Denver, but left a half 
million dollars to the wife in New 
York. It wasn't until the second act 
the husband found out why his wife 
got all the wealth. Then he unloos- 
ened, told a few things, some rea! 
harsh, grabbed the kid and flew back 
to the same old "Harlem flat" that had 
a pretty big parlor for $50 a month 
rental. 

The wife followed him, in the third 
act, leaving her seaside cottage for a 
glimpse of "her boy," a child who 
seemed normal, excepting for the 
blonde curls some one wished upon 
the poor kidlet. The husband told 
his wife to give that half mil to 
charity if she wanted to see her child 
again, and live in the flat. 

Before the wealthy grass widow 
made up her mind, the husband threw 
her around the room, tore her hat 
off, broke a string of pearls, and the 
chain of her gold bag, besides deliv- 
ering a brief but pointed short talk 
when his wife called him a brute. She 
seemed to enjoy the beating up. 

Ernest Glendinning was the youth- 
ful looking husband who gave a force- 
ful performance. Ruth Shepley played 
the emotional wife fairly well, and 
Jeffreys Lewis gave the star show as 
the mother-in-law. Others were Ethel 
Clayton, who didn't matter much eith- 
er way, Willard Robertson, who acted 
sanely, and Neil Moran as an attorney. 

The settings were simple but ac- 
curate. The cottage foyer of the sec- 
ond act was quite pretty. 

"The Brute" ought to do business. 



THE GAMBLERS, 

Stair & Havlin are without repre- 
sentation in Greater New York. Hence 
if one seeks to get some line on what 
sort of offerings are moving over that 
circuit, it becomes necessary to jour- 
ney through Mr. McAdoo's interstate 
tube to the Majestic, Jersey City. 

From a performance of "The Gam- 
blers," which occupied the Majestic 
last week, it would appear that the S. 
& H. people are making a real ef- 
fort to improve the grade of their of- 
ferings. Not that the play itself is 
the best possible for its present pur- 
pose, but the ensemble is in the main 
satisfactory. The piece has, of course, 
the important attraction of having been 
on Broadway, always a factor away 
from the metropolis. And it is being 
played by a fairly capable company. 

In chosing "The Gamblers," however, 
for the tour of the popular priced the- 
atres, the Stair & Havlin booking au- 
thorities have acted unwisely. Plays 
which deal with strictly masculine 
problems do not make wide appeal to 
provincial audiences, if indeed they at- 
tract the theatre-wise clientele even 
of Broadway. 

It is quite true that the piece deals 
with a very modern condition and is 
fairly close to current life, but it seems 
scarcely fair to ask the women of Jer- 
sey City to flock in palpitating crowds 
to the Majestic to listen to a discus- 
sion of Wall street business ethics. 
Admitting for the sake of argument 
that women are the important factor 
in the success or failure of plays, should 
it not be the object of the playwrights 
to deal with the things that most ob- 
viously interest them? 

Charles Klein made "The Gamblers" 
a strictly man's story. The woman 
doesn't live in Jersey City who can 
be thrilled, aroused to interest or re- 
duced to tears over a hero whose most 
spectacular transgression was the bor- 
rowing of money beyond the limit jf 
the banking law. 

After all, the oldest and simplest of 
the emotions are the easiest to arouse. 
"The Gamblers" does not touch on 
one of the familiar strains. The pro- 
gram shows the names of nine men 
characters and only three women. But 
one of the women is really vital to the 
play. At that she's the wife of the 
attorney general who is a most un- 
likeable person. One straightforward 
love affair between two youngsters is 
worth all the modern business prob- 
lems Mr. Klein or any one else cares 
to work into a play. 

Boyd Nolan was the young banker 
who played high finance and then in- 
sisted on taking his medicine. He 
makes an attractive young leading man. 
Lola Downing is attractive as the lead- 
ing woman. She played an unsympa- 
thetic part intelligently and with a 
good deal of grace. Franklyn George 
was rather stagey and forced. Harry 
Forsman left a very blonde impression. 
Willis Granger was stilted, while Luke 
Martin and Thomas Callahan saved the 
day by handling well some of the quiet 
comedy. Rush. 

If it does, it will be a clean-up for 
the promoters, with eight people in 
the cast. The play, minus the second 
act, could, as a sketch, go into vau- 
deville. Sime. 



THE WOMAN HATERS. 

The newest European operetta, 
"The Woman Haters," adapted from 
the German by George V. Hobart, and 
presented at the Astor theatre this 
week, is a palpable effort to para- 
phrase "The Merry Widow." It may 
not succeed to that extent — such 
things seldom do — but it is without 
doubt a pleasant evening's diversion 
of the light musical order. 

"The Woman Haters" has for a 

basic plot a romantic love tale that, 

if not so often diverted by heteroge- 
neous and extraneous matters, should 
have gone on to an interesting and 
logical conclusion. Instead of the ho* 
mogeneity attempted, the piece at times 
goes off at a tangent and requires her- 
culean labor to place it back on the 
right track after each derailment. 

The piece also suffered from its in- 
terpretation at the hands of the prin- 
cipal female player, Sally Fisher, who 
in her songs and love scenes is cold 
and unsympathetic Hers is* identical- 
ly the female prototype of the role of 
the prince in "The Merry Widow." She 
had quarrelled with her lover years be- 
fore, had written, begging forgiveness, 
and received no reply. The letter had 
miscarried— or rather been undelivered 
— without their knowledge. He forms 
the Woman Haters' Club. She re- 
turns, tries to win him, and is sup- 
posed to exercise all the familiar — 
and a few especially alluring and un- 
familiar — wiles of a charming widow. 
There should have been imparted to 
this character a dash and verve calcu- 
lated to set every man's heart aflut- 
ter. Miss Fisher sings finely, looks 
sweet and dances prettily. But you 
could view her performances for a 
generation and your heart would not 
flutter a single "flut." The "divine 
spark" isn't there. 

On the contrary, little Dolly Cas- 
tles, the ingenue, is full of this very 
essential. She flits through the piece 
with a grace and abandon that rele- 
gates the leading feminine part to the 
background. Walter Lawrence has the 
disappointed lover role and gets con- 
siderable out of it. He is handicapped, 
however, by the lack of fire on the 
part of Miss Fisher, having nothing 
to "play up" to. Joseph Santley has 
the juvenile man part and offers a 
neat performance, though his dance 
steps are all alike. Snitz Edwards in 
a low comedy German dialect part usu- 
ally extracted a laugh whenever the 
opportunity presented itself, as did 
Mrs. Stuart Robson as an obese dow- 
ager. Oddly enough, the biggest hit 
of the entertainment is Leslie Ken- 
yon in a non-singing role, that of "I- 
mean-to-say" Englishman with a line 
of conversation likening everything in 
life to an automobile. 

Toward the close of the piece there 
was a grand ninth inning comedy ral- 
ly delivered by Miss Castle with a line 
properly led up to and finely "plant- 
ed." The juvenile man had been en- 
deavoring to secure his uncle's consent 
to their marriage. After a preliminary 
talk about nightgowns, she says: "You 
won't ever see me in my nightie un- 
less you speak to your uncle." De- 
livered with artistic ingenuousness, it 
is a home run. Jolo. 



24 



VARIETY 



TANTALIZING TOMMY. 

"Tantalizing Tommy" is very tanta 
lizing; it's awfully irritating. A 
musical comedy without especial 
brightness in book or wit in dialog 
comes along to the Criterion theatre, 
well dressed and with a most tuneful 
score, but carrying none to hold up 
the piece. 

"Tantalizing Tommy," with another 

cast, might have been another story, 
in the reviews and on the stage. The 
dramatic critics could not be blamed 
for going to "Tommy" pretty hard on 
its first New York showing as a mu- 
sical piece (Criterion, Oct. 2). The 
A. H. Woods production came from 
Chicago, where it had created no stp\ 

The story is from the French, and in 
the original might have been naughty. 
Michael Morton and Paul Gauvault, 
authors of the book, cleansed it thor- 
oughly for America. "Tommy" is the 
daughter of a caramel manufacturer. 
From bits of conversation she is sup- 
posed to be a handsome, mischievous 
young un, who, figuratively, leads her 
wealthy father about by the nose. 
While motoring in the suburbs of 
Paris the machine breaks down. No 
habitat is in sight, excepting an old 
chateau, where Paul Norman, an under 
clerk in the government employ, lives, 
with his best friend, Gaston Berolle, a 
painter. 

Looking for assistance, Tommy and 
her chauffeur enter the grounds of 
Norman's home at near midnight, wake 
up the family and take possession. 
Finding it impossible to repair the ma- 
chine before the driver can return from 
Paris, Tommy ousts Norman from his 
room and spends the night there. Next 
morning at eleven the Under Secretary 
of the Ministry, with his daughter (to 
whom Norman is engaged) arrive. 
They are an hour ahead of time. The 
father deems it a very suspicious cir- 
cumstance that Norman should have 
had a young woman visitor all night. 
Tie withdraws his daughter from the 
garden and the engagement. For two 
mure scenes the first error threads 
through until Norman and Tommy 
confess love of each other. Norman 
had lost his position meanwhile and 
Tommy had threatened to enter a con- 
vent. 

Each song has something to it that 
is attractive. Two or three would be 
real song hits were the voices there 
to sing them. At the opening of the 
second act "Zizi," led by Frances Rich- 
ards, is the first live moment. It's in 
ensemble number, with the dancing of 
the Berlin Madcaps in it. "Irish Stew" 
is the catchiest melody. Its air is 
closely related to a waltz strain 
through the piece. "Oh, Go Away" is 
a comedy song, nicely sung by Dor- 
othy Webb. 

As a matter of record, the only play- 
ers who fitted their roles at all were 
Miss Webb (as a maid) and John Park, 
the artist. Mr. Park had an idea of 
what the part demanded. George An- 
derson and Elizabeth Brice in the prin- 
cipal roles of Norman and Tommy 
were all wrong. Miss Brice is without 
humor. She made Tommy an ingenue. 
Excepting "Fairy Bells," her numbers 
were not so very difficult to manipu- 
late if a comedienne was behind them. 
Dallas Welford, hitherto posing as a 



COLONIAL. 

(Estimated Coit of Show, $4,400.) 

"The Colonial audience" has gone. 
Where, no one knows. The Monday 
night crowd, not a very large one, re- 
vealed ever so many strange faces, 
strange even to the house staff. It 
might be lese majeste to suggest that 
"B. F. Keith" be taken off the front 

of the Colonial. That could be tried, 
thus allowing the feature attraction to 
alone carry the blame for bad business. 

In the orchestra were many holes. 
The fifty-cent scats were filled. There 
are about four rows in the rear at that 
price. Down to "K" are the seventy- 
five cent seats. These were less than 
half full. About the same condition 
was apparent in the dollar section 
(from "K" to« "A"). The smoking 
balcony held about sixty-five per cent, 
of capacity, with a seedy-looking lot of 
people in the fifty-cent division. These 
were the overflow from the fifty-cent 
section downstairs. The gallery, with 
seats reserved at twenty-five cents, was 
half empty. 

Considering the quantity of "paper" 
that came in Monday evening, the 
showing at the Colonial was almost 
gloomy. Monday night, however, is not 
the best (or was not in the past) of 
the Colonial week, but the absence of 
the regulars, those nice people of the 
middle West Side, speaks more than 
even empty seats can. If the Keith 
management won't mind the imputa- 
tion the Colonial audience Monday 
evening was about the best imitation 
of a small time vaudeville gathering 
that New York has ever seen at "first 
class" (vaudeville) prices. 

The show this week is clean. A few 
"clean" vaudeville bills at the Colonial 
may bring back the strayers. Outside 
of a "hell" and a couple of "damns" 
in Cliff Gordon's monolog, there was 
nothing to complain of in the entire 
bill (if one excepts that vice triumphs 
in the "Detective Keen" sketch). That 
is a new aspect to vaudeville. Hurrah 
for the clean show! (Perhaps it was 
an accident.) 

The big headline is Lulu Glaser in 
"First Love," rather a good vehicle for 
a legitimate debutante. Miss Glaser 
plays it well, when acting. Her sing- 
ing and songs, also those of Thomas 
D. Richards, the tenor, with his sing- 
ing, dropped far below. The Glaser 
skit followed Diamond and Brennan. 
It suffered accordingly after this lively 

comedian, interjected no comedy into 
the Under - Secretary - father - of - his 
daughter, nor was any intended, per- 
haps, therefore Mr. Welford was out 
of his element. Donald Hall gave a 
Clifton Crawford reading of a fop role. 
Robert Pitkin tried for laughs by ex- 
aggerating the eccentricities of the 
candy manufacturer. One of these ec- 
centricities was often repeated, always 
accompanied by music, making it very 
unreal and ridiculous. 

There are other principals, of course, 
and a chorus, but none lightened the 
gloom of what might have been a very 
enjoyable show had it been well 
casted. 

Mr. Woods is said to have held the 
manuscript for quite a while, while 
casting about for some one to fit the 
title role. Sime. 



comedy and singing act. Miss Glaser 
had quite a time in picking up the 
house. This she did with her work 
and smile. The comedienne should 
change her dress of black for the maiJ 
character to another color and design. 
The operetta finished well, followed by 
Mr. Gordon, who divided the big hit 
record of the evening with Diamond 
and Brennan (New Acts). 

Mr. Gordon found his old bits were 
going well and held to them, until close 
to the finish, when he delved into the 
present political situation. His com- 
ment on this is not as brightly pointed 
as usual. One line about "Wilson in 
front with Sulzer on the side" stood 
out as the best. It is some time since 
Mr. Gordon has appeared at the Co- 
lonial. 

The show forced Robbie Gordone, 
a posing act, into the closing position. 
The Woods and Woods Trio, on the 
wire, who opened, could have better 
held the spot. No other act on the 
bill, however, was fitted to open. A 
comedy closing turn might have been 
there to finish the program, with Miss 
Gordone in the opening after intermis- 
sion, sending Diamond and Brennan 
into "No. 4," which would have re- 
moved the latter from too close prox- 
imity to the Glaser turn. Still with 
Macart and Bradford in the first half 
this arrangement would not have been 
the best. One of the acts on the pro- 
gram, if it had been taken out, with 
another type of turn replacing it, would 
have remedied the only blot on a very 
good running program. 

Macart and Bradford ("No. 3") 
played "A Legitimate Hold-Up," get- 
ting plenty of laughs with Mr. Macart's 
souse and the neat playing of Miss 
Bradford, who for looks and "clothes" 
led the evening's feminine procession. 
The Woods and Woods Trio have a 
nice opening number that might be 
worked more rapidly. 

An attraction of the first half was 
Willa Holt Wakefield, again obliged 
to deliver her pianolog in "one" when 
class requires class for aid. Miss 
Wakefield should not be made to de- 
mand a parlor set. The management, 
if it wanted to give the best show, 
would provide one for her in laying 
out the bill. This "convenience thing" 
that hurts an artist, the show and may- 
hap the stage manager's feelings, is 
handy to overcome difficulties, but it 
does nothing else. And it will be usual- 
ly found a stage manager of a vaude- 
ville theatre knows all about the bill 
he is running. Some day the arrange- 
ment may be left to the man in charge 
of the stage. Miss Wakefield did about 
what she always does, but she may 
have been somewhat disappointed in 
the altered calibre of the Colonial pa- 
trons. A new little verse, "Wooden 
Shoes," was employed by her for the 
first time. "Dirty Little Hands" should 
be replaced in the act. It has a uni- 
versal human appeal and Miss Wake- 
field handles it well. 

The Daniel Frohman sketch, "Detect- 
ive Keen," was the first half closer, 
placed right, for a dramatic. As a 
sketch of the criminology class, the 
"Keen" writing will get over. The 
players individually earn little enthusi- 
asm. Ruby Hoffman as the crook- 
serving maid was the best. Cooper and 
Robinson, "No. 2," also appeared. 

Sime. 



AMERICAN ROOF. 

The show runs very much to the 
sob stuff and polite specialties. Alice 
Hanson (New Acts) put across the 
only real laughing number of the eve- 
ning. Togo and Geneva opened with 
a straight wire act, the man and wom- 
an showing nothing out of the ordi- 
nary. Two numbers later, Teddy 
Dupont sang three ballads, gracefully, 
but scarcely in a manner to help the 
comedy side of the show. Kollins ami 
the Klifton sisters put over their in- 
teresting banjo specialty, and finally 
the Cycling Brunettes offered their 
almost straight bicycle turn. That is 
piling up polite acts. 

In the sob department were Ben 
Smith, blackface monologist, who sang 
"Silver Threads Among the Gold" and 
a sympathetic ballad in a light, high 
tenor voice that fairly trickled with 
tears. John T. Doyle and Co. were on 
late in the dramatic sketch, "Putting 
One Over." Miss Hanson was calleJ 
upon to carry the "comedy relief" for 
the whole bill. That she got away 
with it speaks well for her new offer- 
ing. 

While the so-called "big time" pro- 
ducers are taking all sorts of liberties 
with literary conventions, it is worth 
mentioning that the Doyle sketch, 
which deals with material that could 
easily be made morbidly interesting, 
breaks not one of the rules of propri- 
ety. "Putting One Over" deals with 
police methods and the rounding up of 
a crook, but the heroine turns out to 
be a decent person, and the crook lands 
in jail. Up-to-the-minute sketches, as 
some of our producers prefer them, 
deal with quite another sort of hero- 
ine, and crooks commonly are 
represented as worthy of reward and 
sympathy. The Doyle vehicle is well 
put together for the small time. It 
has direct, if not convincing, action 
and rounds out satisfactorily. 

Another sketch on the same bill was 
Meyer Harris and Co. in the famil- 
iar "End of the World" from "Wine. 
Woman and Song." Harris follows 
the original of the character closely 
and makes it fairly effective. His sup- 
porting players are rather crude. 

Miss Dupont looks extremely pretty- 
in modish clothes and sings agreeably, 
but does not get beyond the classi- 
fication of a light number. The Six 
Madcaps try to get too much over and 
end by becoming tiresome. Fifteen 
minutes of lively dancing with one 
song at the most, would get them more 
than their present loosely put-together 
arrangement. 

Kollins and the Klifton Sisters de- 
liver a capital banjo specialty. There 
is some novelty in the imitations of 
Kollins, and the two girls give the 
act an attractive appearance. Goodwin 
and Elliott were billed for the "No. 2" 
spot, but were replaced by Ben Smith 
Smith's talk is rather monotonous, per- 
haps, because it is delivered in a list- 
less way. However, there was little of 
it. Smith has a high voice of just 
the quality to strike the small time 
audience. Rush. 



Martin Emery, the Chicago theatri- 
cal man, is in New York negotiating 
for several pieces of stage property 
which he may send out on the road 
before the first of the new year. ' 



VARIETY 



25 



WINTER GARDEN 

The Sunday night vaudeville con- 
certs at the Winter Garden have greatly 
improved of late. The full value is now 
secured from the bills through placing 
of the turns. Jule Delmar, who stands 
pretty near the head of the class in 
laying out a vaudeville program, has 
been gathering the shows together. 

While the bill last Sunday night 
lacked a comedy balance, its speed held 
up an average of excellence. The first 
half of eight acts was finished in sixty- 
five minutes. The second, of five acts, 
consumed about the same time. la 
between was a twenty-minute intermis- 
sion, extending the final curtain until 
11.05. The show started at 8.35. 

The evening's surprise was Bayes and 
Norworth, and the evening's hit (in 
the next to last position) was Howard 
and Howard. Bayes and Norworth 
closed the first half. No card was 
placed nor were they programed. With 
the drop taken up, they were under a 
spot kissing each otker. During their 
stay upon the stage, they kissed often, 
while singing old favorites called for 
by the audience. The closing number 
(new) Mr. Norworth announced he 
would tell the writer of after the first 
verse if — but he didn't. The couple 
were quickly recognized and loudly 
received, finishing in applause second 
to the Howards, who are immensely 
popular up there. In Willie Howard, 
the Shuberts have found a successor 
to Al Jolson for catching and retain- 
ing the favor of the Garden crowd. 

The Howards slightly changed their 
turn from the previous Sunday. Willie 
sang a couple of songs, new for him, 
including an 'Italian lyric on "Pagliacci." 
Gene Howard immediately afterward 
sang it "straight." If Gene had sung 
this number in vaudeville, some of 
these Caesar Nesis, fooling around, 
would have been chased to the woods. 
The Howard boys stopped the show 
again. They will stop any show the 
Shuberts can put on. 

Another extraordinary score was 
registered by Martin Brown and the 
Dolly Sisters, in their dancing num- 
ber from "The Merry Countess." It's 
too bad this calls for dialog by Mr. 
Brown, but otherwise he f is always 
there on his feet. The Dolly girls are 
not a whit behind him. Texas Guinan, 
who has replaced Shirley Kellogg ; n 
the regular Garden production, led one 
of her songs from the show, with near- 
ly the full troupe of well-dressed chor- 
isters in the rear. Trixie Friganza 
gave a singing monolog act in "one." 
Charlotte Greenwood and Sydney 
Grant, also from the Garden company, 
did a couple of their show songs, Miss 
Greenwood emphasizing the bit with 
her side kicks. Adelaide and Hughes 
repeated their new "canoeing" act. It 
cannot stand repetition until Adelaide 
puts in some of her tricky toe dancing- 
Any act by itself with her in it needs 
that. Carter De Haven appeared in 
his "piano-act," having one song de- 
scriptive of his family, fortune and 
household. 

The Cox Family, a mjxed quartet, 
opened the bill lightly with song. Tlij 
Ceballos followed, and livened it up 
with a fast acrobatic dance. The Dippy 
Diers act, from the Hippodrome, in 
which Dippy Diers or someone else im- 
itates Jimmy Rice, also Bert Melrose 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $3,900.) 

There is quantity galore in the 12- 
act bill this week at Hammerstein's, 
but as much cannot be said for the 
quality. Edna Goodrich is the head- 
liner. The presence of two singing 
monologists, Stuart Barnes and Frank 
A. Mullane, was an unusual feature. 

The first half of the show moved 
along very quietly, with honors going 
to Harry Puck and Mabelle Lewis in 
their simple singing and dancing spe- 
cialty and the Bell Boy Trio. Miss 
Goodrich closed the first half. The 
second half made much better enter- 
tainment, but the audience kept trail- 
ing out. The Five Sullys and Fay, 2 
Coleys and Fay checked the walking 
out movement successfully. 

Brown and Williams opened the 
show about 8 o'clock. The Close 
Brothers, acrobats, were last at 11.26. 
The length of the bill worked seriously 
against the Jater numbers. Stuart 
Barnes, second after intermission, had 
the pick of position. He wisely ad- 
dresses his humorous talk to the fem- 
inine portion of the audience. A girl 
in the Monday night audience wore an 
asphalt face until Barnes delivered his 
courtship talk. Then she laughed until 
her willow plume tossed like a palm 
tree in a gale. The monologist fol- 
lowed another talking comedian and 
got away with it easily. 

At about 11 o'clock the Five Sullys 
started to play what looked like the 
second comedy sketch of the evening. 
The house was listless at first, but the 
eccentric dancing of the bell boy woke 
them up with a jolt. The sketch por- 
tion moves like clockwork with its 
complex situations, but it is the singing 
and dancing that gives the turn its best 
interest. The dancing finale put the 
quintet over for a substantial hit. 

Fay, 2 Coleys and Fay were next to 
closing, a position that could not be 
made more difficult. There was a 
movement toward the doors when their 
card appeared, but the fast nonsense of 
the blackface turn stopped the exodus 
and held the crowd interested. 

"My Lady's Fan" made a first rate 
number to open the second half. No 
better handling of light effects has been 
seen and there is real artistic merit to 
the tableaux. 

"The Awakening of Minerva," Miss 
Goodrich's vehicle, offers nothing in 
the way of novelty, but it does fulfill 
its real purpose of making an excuse 
for the appearance of the statuesque 
Edna in Grecian draperies. Miss Good- 
rich in these same draperies is a whole 
production. Besides her generous love- 
liness, Miss Goodrich has a gift of hu- 
mor. 

Adonis and Dog were "No. 2," fol- 
lowed by the Bell Boy Trio. The 
clever pup did a whole lot for the gym- 
nast. The trio have a boy Hebrew 
comedian who gets laughs and their 
harmony gave them a capital finish. 

Rush, 

(in the "Melrose trick" even using 
the bird business) did little in the fun 
making way. Steefy Berko (opening 
the second half) is a young girl who 
plays a violin without expression. 

In speaking of the Winter Garden, 
please don't forget to mention Sam 
Lehman and his orchestra. The flops 
that orchestra has saved! JSime. 



BRONX. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $3,350.) 
A smooth-running, well laid-out pro- 
gram (looking more in many respects 
like a real Percy G. Williams' bill than 

any which has been seen in the Wil- 
liams houses since they have been 
booked by Keith) took the audience 
off its feet. The house was fair only, 
but those on hand made up in enthu- 
siasm what they lacked in numbers. 
If this bill can't do business at the 
Bronx, then Keith might just as well 
shove the small time shows in right 
away instead of waiting a few more 
weeks. 

"The Trained Nurses" headline, but 
Clark and Bergman should headline 
"The Trained Nurses," instead of be- 
ing billed "with." The reception given 
Clark and Bergman at the close of the 
act equalled anything ever heard in 
a vaudeville theatre. The couple seem 
to be making a mistake in burying their 
identity in an act at just this time, 
when they should be stepping into 
the leading double-act position in vau- 
deville. With Brice and King out of 
vaudeville, and Rock and Fulton on 
the way out, Clark and Bergman could 
fill the double vacancy and also draw 
down part of the big salary thing. 
Remaining with the Lasky act simply 
means coming back to vaudeville next 
year and starting from where they 
finished last season. "The Trained 
Nurses" as an act is about the best 
thing Lasky has ever done, but he did 
it by engaging Clark and Bergman. 

Jessie Busley and Co. closed the 
first half. In the Bronx, where this 
shop-girl sort of thing should be known 
if anywhere the act went splendidly. 
The slang, the shop girls' English, and 
the cheap sentiment all carried. 

Dolan and Lenharr caught "No. 3" 
with their travesty mind reading. The 
laughs followed each other in rapid 
succession. Hugh Mack figures in the 
proceedings with the principals in a 
big way, sharing the comedy points 
about evenly with Dolan. The act has 
improved with working and now makes 
a fast comedy offering. 

Belle Baker, "No. 4," didn't get over 
very far. Songs are needed badly. The 
singer has never had a poorer reper- 
toire, although in one or two cases 
it seems to be her fault more than 
that of the song. "You're My Baby," 
a corking number for a great many 
singers, really hurts Miss Baker from 
the manner in which she sings it. It's 
a good number the way it is written, 
and that's the way it should be sung. 
Bessie Wynn could teach Miss Baker 
something about this song, as could 
Lillian Shaw about her Italian number, 
which seems to be a dead steal from 
"I Gotta Da Rock." 

Tom Davies Trio closing the show 
passed the chills up and down the 
backs of the audience with their whirl- 
ing around the- raised track on niDtor 
cycles. 

Kate Klinorc and Sam Williams were 
a solid hit next to closing. 

Felix Adler opened after the inter- 
mission and worked at a disadvantage, 
but when he got to the ventriloquial 
bit, he had them going and landed 
heads up. 

Lynch and Zeller opened the pro- 
gram. MrMahon, Diaim-nd and ('leni- 
ence (New Acts). Dash. 



5TH AVENUE. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $2,950.) 

The bill at the Ave. is interesting and 
to the three-quarters filled house Mon- 
day night, certainly amusing. It is 
seldom these days that an audience of 
the enthusiastic brand gets into a 
vaudeville theatre, but this crowd sim- 
ply went to it on every occasion. 

Vaudeville managers should feel good 
to know that there are still so many 
people who can go wildly enthusiastic 
over their shows and they would do 
well to protect that class of patrons 
Allowing a thing like the "Dope" song 
used by Gladys Vance (New Acts) is 
* not doing it, and it's a pfty. The song 
was not done at the matinee Monday. 
The number did not bring the singer 
back for a bow, which was a good 
sign. 

Frey Twins opened the program with 
their fast wrestling exhibition. The 
boys on appearance make the running 
at the start. Away from the ordinary, 
the Frey Twins arc very welcome and 
the clean-cut wholcsomeness of the turn 
is refreshing. They were accorded a 
hearty reception and sent the show 
away very fast. Miss Vance did not 
retard the progress any until she hit 
the Dope song, which lowered her stock 
to sea level. 

McDevitt, Kelly and Irene Lucy were 
"No. 3" and sent over a great big laugh- 
ing hit which came from all parts of 
the house. The talk and dancing of 
the two boys got over to big results 
and the very good looks and straight 
playing of Irene Lucy helped out not 
a little. A good comedy act of the sort 
which are rather scarce these days, 
McDevitt, Kelly and Irene Lucy are 
worth at least $400 weekly to big time 
vaudeville. 

Hart's Six Steppers were billed for 
"4," but were switched to "6," Carl 
Demarest (New Acts) changing places 
with them. 

George Beban and Co. in "The Sign 
of the Rose," went from "7" to "5." The 
sketch held the house at attention, and 
the acting of the star was interrupted 
several times by big applause. The 
same pretty set is utilized and a very 
good company surrounds Mr. Beban. 
The central office man is a big, burly 
fellow who throws the smaller Beban 
around as though he were a child. 
There is a pretty flower girl and a 
good-looking, very, stylishly gowned 
mother. A cute kiddie and a daddy 
that will do round out the cast. 

The Six Steppers went through their 
routine of dancing following the sketch 
and for some reason did not get what 
they usually do. The effect of the pa- 
thetic playlet ahead may have been the 
cause. The act docs nicely, however, 
although it is not big enough for so 
important a position. 

Jock McKay, next to closing, was a 
laughing hit. McKay has improved 
wonderfully since he first opened here 
a few years ago. He could be made 
a big vaudeville feature with trie proper 
handling. 

Blake and Amber (New Acts) were 
"No. 7" and skimmed through, while 
Millie- Reeves (New Acts) in the closing 
spot had un difficulty hoMim- them in. 



26 



VARIETY 



MARION'S DREAMLANDS. 

Twenty-seven chorus girls, a few 
chorus boys and a number of princi- 
pals, forty-four people on the stage at 
one time, in a burlesque show — Dave 
Marion's "Dreamlands"! 

Nothing else of consequence need be 
said. It is giving burlesque something 
when the stage looks like a Broadway 
production, as Marion's show does. 
Marion builds along the Broadway idea, 
without having the capacity or prices 
in front of him, as a "$2 show" has. 

The "Dreamlands" this season isn't 
a "$2 show," but in its surroundings 
and background look like one. For 
a manager who did a clean-up on his 
first tour of the Eastern Wheel (as 
Marion did last season) to come for- 
ward now with a brand new show : .s 
miraculous in burlesque. Other man- 
agers would have been content to have 
played themselves out In the produc- 
tion that got the money on the first 
trip. (Several are doing it now on 
the Eastern and Western Wheel.) 

"The Dreamlands" is new to the 
Eastern Wheel this season, excepting 
some of the people and Mr. Marion's 
always entertaining comedy as "Stuffy, 
the Cab Driver." Quite a little of the 
inserted business, and the numbers, 
have been revived from Marion's West- 
ern Wheel show of two years ago. For 
the East they pass as welcome stran- 
gers. "The Dreamlands" big number, 
and Marion's best produced bit, "Fol- 
low Your Master," arrives at the finale 
of the performance. As a comedy 
scene it is a whole show in itself. This 
year Marion is having his chorus girls 
play a melodrama. 

"A Fast Life and a Merry One" is 
recited by Marion in the character of 
the private secretary, and "Scenes from 
Life" is put on as one of the three olio 
acts. The "Life Scenes" is well staged. 
It is one of the Marion trademarks, and 
sharply contrasts to the liveliness and 
speed of the remainder of his per- 
formance. (Another Marion trademark 
is cleanliness, and he again adheres to 
it.) "I Didn't; Yes, You Did," is also 
revived, but it is worked more quietly 
than formerly and might be roughened 
up some. "Bonnie Mary," probably the 
first of the Scotch number that showed 
around in burlesque, is also in this 
season's piece. "In Vaudeville" is 
there, with Billie Davis, a chorus girl, 
falling down on the imitations. "Good- 
bye, Pal," closes the first part. 

The show starts with a little prolog 
in "one" on "Burlesque." The same 
masked figure who recited it concluded 
the entertainment with another speech. 
The opening of the first part runs stead- 
ily for thirty-five minutes, without the 
girls or principals leaving the stage. It 
is all song and action, too much, in 
fact. Marion might arrive before he 
does, or the opening be broken up in 
some way. Also the Symphony Four 
and Lawrence and Thompson as the 
olio proper, preceding "Life Scenes," 
all entered under the guise of a Cab- 
aret show in "one," become too light 
for vaudeville attention, between the 
weight of the performance before and 
after. 

The new show is called "Pousse 
Cafe," written, staged and produced by 
Marion, with Oscar Licbman credited 
as having arranged the music. Mr. 
Leibman is the musical conductor. Wil- 
liam Lawrence seems principal come- 



dian, second to Marion. As a He- 
brew, Thompson fairly pleases, but he 
is no headline in that class. During 
the first part he has the "card" busi- 
ness for laughs. Fred Collins is the 
straight, singing "Mother's Health" 
for a mush ballad appeal. Agnes Ben- 
ler is principal woman, leading the 
"Vaudeville" number and dressing the 
role properly. Louie Rice is supposed 
to be the soubret. She dances now 
and then, and tries to act in the "Moth- 
er" bit. Inez De Verdier is prima 
donna. Miss De Verdier has a pe- 
culiar voice that must be fitted. "Oh, 
You Lize" suits it far better than any- 
thing else attempted. Miss De Verdier 
is a good-looking woman, and led the 
"rag" with much vim, also dancing well 
in it. Next to the "Follow the Leader," 
"Lize" was the best liked number, but 
not holding just the right swing for 
"Turkey Trotting," although the chorus 
went to it very well. It's a good 
working chorus Marion has, the girls 
apparently laughingly enjoying the 
performance equally with the audience. 

Other characters were taken by Max 
Gordon, Mart Thompson and James X. 
Francis. Several more principals were 
programed. Still, outside of Marion 
himself, "The Dreamlands" is fearfully 
shy of anyone approaching the star 
division. Marion only needs himself, 
however, and, in proof of that, the per- 
formance drags when he is not on the 
stage. The speed and the action are 
not enough to fill the void left by his 
absence, and there may be too much 
rush without coherency. 

But forty-four people with an indi- 
vidual star at their headl As a pro- 
ducer, showman and drawing attrac- 
tion, Marion is a gold mine to the 
Eastern Wheel. He should have ten 
shows on it instead of one — when you 
think of some of the other Eastern 
Wheel managers who put out two or 
more shows every season — blindfolded. 

Bime. 



UNION SQUARE. 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $2,750.) 

The regular went wrong on his 
dope at the Union Square this week. 
In sizing up the show ahead of time 
he figured it out that the bill would 
be shy a lot of entertainment. That's 
where he sized up wrong. In the 
running Monday night the bill worked 
out nicely and gave big satisfaction. 
The theatre was comfortably filled. 
Scattered throughout the audience 
were battleship boys. The house was 
very enthusiastic and each act came in 
for a liberal share of applause. 

"The System," Taylor Granville's po- 
lice sketch, is playing its second week. 
It has been shoved down a few pegs 
and is now closing the show. On the 
Union Square program this week In 
that position is just where it belongs 
as it runs over a half hour and has 
three scenes. 

With public sentiment runing high 
now over the scandal in the police de- 
partment, "The System" is bound to 
get a lot of sympathy in the Four- 
teenth street neighborhood. 

Peppino, aceordianist, opened the 
show. This young man has made 
marked improvement since playing the 
American Roof last year. He shows 
more familiarity with the stage and has 
switched from the rag medley to the 



popular song stuff. While getting con- 
siderable out of it, a good rag or two 
will help him gain "big time" popular- 
ity. 

Peppino doesn't mop the stage with 
his hair nor endeavor to break every 
bone in his body while playing. He 
works in a quiet, easy manner and 
grinds out good music. At the Union 
Square the young Italian went over 
nicely. 

Ergotti and Lilliputians were second. 
The little fellows became big favor- 
ites from the start. They work up their 
comedy effectively and combine it nice- 
ly with a "risley" routine. The midgets 
now use an airship contrivance for 
their whirl around the stage at the fin- 
ish. Sophye Bernard was the first of 
the single women to appear. She was 
in. good voice. Latnberti pleased with 
his musical protean offering. He might 
profit by adding an American to his 
list of impersonations. Lou Anger 
found the audience ripe for his mono- 
log. His soldier talk came in handy 
with the warships in the North River. 

Cross and Josephine had an easy 
spot and made the best of it. Lillian 
Shaw scored best with "I Gotta da 
Rock." For encores she rendered sev- 
eral of her old numbers. Mark. 



ORPHEUM 

(Estimated Cost of Show, $3,850.) 

The nearest thing to a fall down of 
the entire program is a new act by 
Jesse Lasky, all the others being, in 
the main, old-timers, who made good 
to such an extent that it was an ex- 
cellent working bill that pleased the 
audience immensely Monday evening. 
The Lasky production is "In the Bar- 
racks," a military operetta (New Acts). 

The show opened at 8.12 with the 
Steiner Trio, comedy bar gymnasts, 
with a turn fashioned after the Ca- 
mille Trio seen hereabout for a num- 
ber of seasons. Perhaps this is a 

"copy" act, secured at a cheaper price 
than the original and hence more in 
demand at the booking offices. t The 
Farber Girls, in a dainty "sister" turn, 
were favorably received in second posi- 
tion. 

Ed. F. Reynard's big ventriloquial 
production act, with a lot of new ef- 
fects, evoked screams of laughter at 
the comedy. The Nichols Sisters have 
a couple of new songs with the same 
talk of last season. 

Mullen and Coogan are more "bur- 
lesquey" in their methods than when 
seen at the Fifth Avenue a couple of 
months ago and, strange to say, are 
better liked. They are using John 
Neff's musical instrument comedy busi- 
ness as a "bit." Ida Brooks Hunt 
and Cheridah Simpson have also 
changed for the better approval of au- 
diences since at the Fifth Avenue. 
They no longer wear kilts or make any 
attempt at costume changes. 

McMahon and Chappelle's card got 
applause before they appeared, showing 
that favorites arc not forgotten. They 
convulsed the audience with their mat- 
rimonial duolog. Great Tornados, aer- 
ial tumblers, preceded the pictures. 

"New faces" are all right — when you 
can find good ones; but if you don't 
want to gamble, it's best to play a bill 
made up of standard material. Jolo. 



LADY BUCCANEERS. 

The one point in which Campbell 
& Drew's "Lady Buccaneers" fails is in- 
the effectiveness of the comedy inter- 
vals. One would be inclined to call 
that a serious defect in a burlesque 
show. It is the factor that keeps the 
organization from putting over a top 
class evening's entertainment. 

The managers have done themselves 
proud in costuming and scenic acces- 
sories. The numbers are well han- 
dled and the choristers uniformly good 
looking. But when the opening piece 
had gone nearly to its finish and there 
had not been a hearty laugh, the au- 
dience became apathetic. A bit of 
horseplay at the finale could not wake 
them up. 

For the most part the talk and busi- 
ness are clean. There was one not- 
able exception to this at the Eighth 
Avenue last week. Annie Goldie puts 
over some exceptionally coarse ma- 
terial, coarse even for Eighth avenue, 
which is saying a great deal. 

John C. Hanson spells his name in 
fat type on the program. He plays a 
stupid German boy in the two-act bur- 
lesque, which he wrote himself. His 
characterization is rather indefinite 
and he fails to develop enough broad 
comedy out of it. Burlesque shows 
built on a book by the principal come- 
dian commonly have this fault of in- 
effective comedy. 

It is astonishing how much is add- 
ed to the proceedings by seven nice 
looking, gingery "ponies," who are 
dressed prettily all the time. Those 
seven and the posing specialty of the 
Larados Models did more for "The 
Lady Buccaneers" than all the rest of 
company. The posing act, capitally 
stage managed, makes splendid bur- 
lesque material. 

The song hit of the piece was "Mel- 
low Melody," led by Marceline De 
Montague, assisted by pretty much all 
the other principals planted hither and 
yon in the audience. The working up 
of the number was rather strenuous. 
This same Marceline had a specialty 
toward the end of the first act. It 
was the simplest sort of a straight 
singing turn, but a good voice helped 
it up, and established the bit as the 
best applause getter of the early half. 
Gertrude Ralston led half a dozen 
numbers in a listless way. With her 
good looks she should make a better 
impression. In an Italian number she 
wore a knickerbocker costume of dull 
red, while the girls behind were bril- 
liantly garbed in a pretty combination 
of yellow. It is poor judgment to 
have the leader of an ensemble dressed 
less attractively than the chorus. 

Another bit poorly managed was the 
maltreating of the straight (W. M. 
Harris) by the comedians. Hanson 
has some fairly amusing nonsense in 
the second act, but as the principal 
comedian of a Wheel organization he 
does not make the distance. 

A pretty production and the ponies 
mentioned make "The Lady Buccan- 
eers" a fairly acceptable offering. The 
Larados, one of the three specialties 
in the olio, were the only item of in- 
terest in the variety interval. Rush. 



VARIETY 



27 



BILLS NEXT WEEK. 

(Continued from page 16). 



O'Rourke A O'Rourke 
Harry Brooks Co 
Tbos P Dunne 
Hugh Lloyd Co 
" B PANTAGJDS 

(Open* Sun Mat) 
••Monkey Hippodrome" 
Dewey ft Dolls 
Bldrldge ft Barlowe 
Davis ft Scott 
Van ft Pierce 
St. IiOaU 

COLUMBIA (orph) 
Rock ft Fulton 
••Dinklspl Xmas 
names ft Crawford 
jm H Cullen 
Kaufman Sisters 
five Mowatts 
Petite Mlgnon 

Work & Pl»7 . w% 
COLUMBIA (orph) 

Rock ft Fulton 

Barnes ft Crawford 

james H Cullen 

Kaufman Sisters 

5 Mowatta 

Ia Petite Mlgnon 

Work ft Play 

••Dlnkelspiel's Christ- 
mas" 
HIPPODROME 

Laskey's Hoboa 

Booth 3 

Musical Ellisons 

Maxima Models 

Taylor ft Brown 

Carter ft Alita 

Finks Mules 

Kalchl Japa 

PRINCESS 

Princess Maids 

"Htcksvllle Junction" 

Eastman, Moore ft 
Kerrl 

Clarks Dolla 

Bafrlemo's Girls 
KINGS (craw) 

Bernard ft Roberts 

LeClair ft Sampson 

Al Abbott 

5 Columbians 

SHENANDOAH 
(craw) 

Gross ft Jackson 

Robert Hsll 

May Burk Co 

Murry K. Hill 

Dave Woods Animals 

St. Paul 

ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Bertha Kallsh Co 

Carl McCul lough 

Wm Raynore Co 

Bottomly Troupe 

4 Florimonds 

Kemps , 

EMPRESS (sc) 
(Open Sun Mat) 

Lind 

Plccbalnl Troupe 

Milt Arnsman 

Oaylord & Herron 

8 Lorettas 

Sersmtoa, Pa. 
POLI'S (ubo) 

Gardner Crane ft Co 

Edwards Davis ft Co 

Mosher Hayes ft 
Mosher 

Karlton ft Kay 

Palace Quartet 

Bessie La Coutt 

Black ft White 

Seattle 

ORPHEUM 
(Open 8un Mat) 
"Mine Llebschen" 
Great Howard 
Beatrice Mlchelena 
Claudius ft Scarlet 
Chas Olcott 

2 Alfreds 
Marco Belli 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Marseilles 
Pred Morton 
McClaln ft Mack 
Prince Floro 
M^Qinnls Bros 
"Barber Shop" 

PANTAOES 
Ellls-Nowlln 
Qert L Folsom Co 
Mabel Elaine 
Twin City 4 

3 Kelcey Sisters 

■low* City 
ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Belmont ft Harl 
Keao ft Green 
Kaufman Bros 
Sydney Shields Co 
Wlnslow ft Strykcr 
Kelly ft Lnferty 
Katie Gultlnl 

*r»nkan» 
ORPHEUM 
(Open Sun Mat) 
MeConnell ft Simpson 
Geo H Watt 
Ward Bros 
Nat Nararro Co 
Fergson ft Nthlnd 
Hilda Hawthorne 
Meredith ft Snzr 

EMPRESS (pc) 
George E Garden 
Van * Car Avery 
Cnrh fhalloner Co 
"Heaiix ft Relies" 
3 Spa Bros 

PANTAOES 
(Open Sun Mat) 
Mnrlmbaphone 



Whitney's Opera Dolls 
Bessie Leonard 
Greene ft Parker 
John Zlmmer 
Rutherford ft Moore 

Sprlaarlleld 

POLT8 (ubo) 
Gus Edward's Revue 
Billie 8 Hall 
Wills ft Burt 
Barto ft Clark 
Merlin 

Young ft April 
Myraeoac 

GRAND (ubo) 
Lambert ft Ball 
Gladys Alexandria Co 
Norris' Baboons 
Redford ft Winchester 
Pealson ft Ooldle 
Alvln ft Kenny 
Sadie Jansel 

Tarosaa 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Ling Long 
Weaton ft Leon 
Alf Holt 
Barney Gilmore 
Walter H Brown 
"Delicatessen Shop" 

PANTAOES 
"Girl Golden Gate" 
Eleanor Otis Co 
Millard Bros 
DeLea ft Orma 
Esmeralda 

Terre Haate 

VARIETIES (wva) 
Don Carlos Manikins 
Sherman ft McNaugh- 

ton 
Great Richards 
Gormely A Caffray 
Rogers ft Wiley 

2d half 
Robert's Rats ft Cats 
Heron ft Douglas 
Zlg Zag 3 
Hanks Breazele 2 
Moore ft Browning 

Vasesavsr 

ORPHEUM (sc) 
Prltzkow ft Blanchard 
Palls ft Falls 
Glen Ellison 
Leonard ft Whitney 
Howell ft Scott 
"Dance Violins" 
PANTAOES 
"Minstrel Misses" 
Readlck- Freeman Co 
O'Neal ft Walmsley 
Howard Langford 
Zara Carmen 3 
Vtrtarta. B. C. 
EMPRES9 (sc) 
Bessie's Cockatoos 
Collins ft Hart 
Arthur Whiteiaw 
Dancing Maddens 
Italian Troubadors 
WaaalnutuB 
POLI'S 
Ward ft Curran 
Francos .Animals 
Felix Adler 
Premier Duo 
Zola Sisters 
Langdons 
(One to fill) 

CHASE'S (ubo) 
Elinore ft Williams 
Julian Dove Co 
Stanley James Co 
Newbold ft Grlbben 
Beyer ft Bro 
"K Krlngle's Dream" 
"Lad* of Melodle" 
Wlnnta** 
ORPHEUM 
Adrlenne Augarde Co 
Florentine Singers 
Chas Drew Co 
Herbert's Dogs 
Gldsmth ft Hoppe 
Ed Morton 
Flying Martins 

EMPRESS (sc) 
Geo B Reno Co 
Will Oakland 
3 Gerts 
Mab A Weiss 
Lottie Williams Co 
Wore eater 
POLI'S (ubo) 
"Persian Garden" 
Schooler ft Dickenson 
Kalmar ft Brown 
Meriitt ft Douglas 
Eddie Ross 
Alice D'Garmo 

(One to rim 
nerlln 
WINTEROARTEN 
(October) 
Grnssl 
Teddy 
Hnrdt 
Hordlu 
3 Rubes 
Bruckner 
Carlton 
Muria Mlnty 
Yvette 

Collins ft Hart 
Tiller 

Carlisle Kawbawgan 
Pnrln. 
OLYMPIA 
(October) 
"Quaker Girl" 
Alice O'Brien 
Rosny Dheris 
Mls«» Lawlor 
Krvyl 
H Leonl 
Dorvllle 



Albers 
Harry Mass 
Jackson Troupe 
Msnvllle 

FOLIBS BERGERB 
(October) 

Willy Pantser 

Anna Doherty 
Mallls ft Bart 
Maurice Cronln 
French ft Els 
Jules Moy 
"Eternal Walts" 



Jane Mar nee 
P Ardot Duval 
Vleaaa 

RONACHER'S 
(October) 
Permanes 
The Athletes 
Kajlyama 
Jarrow 

Vittoria ft Georgtttl 
Olympla Girls 
Holden 

Clown Barker 
Esmee 



SHOWS NEXT WEEK. 

NEW YORK. 

"A RICH MAN'S SON"— Harris (1st week). 

"A SCRAPE O' THE PEN"-Weber's (4th 
week). 

"BROADWAY JONES" (Geo. M. Cohan)— Co- 
han's (4th week). 

"FANNY'S FIRST PLAY"— Comedy (5th 

"HANKY PANKY"— Broadway (11th week). 

"LITTLE MISS BROWN"— 48th Street (8th 
week ) . 

"LITTLE WOMAN"— Playhouse (1st week). 

"MAN AND SUPERMAN"— Hudson (3d week) 

"MILESTONES"— Liberty (3th week). 

"MIND THE PAINT GIRL" (Billie Burke)— 
Lyceum (6th week). 

"MY BEST GIRL"— Park (6th week). 

"OFFICER 666"— Gaiety (10th week). 

"OH! OH! DSLPHINB— Knickerbocker (3d 
week). 

"READY MONEY"— Elliott (9th week). 

REPERTOIRE (So them and Marlowe)— Man- 
hattan (3d week). 

SPOONER STOCK— Metropolis (60th week). 

'TANTALIZING TOMMY"— Criterion (3d 
week) • 

"THE 'AFFAIRS' OF AN ATOL"— Little (1st 
week). 

"THE ATTACK" (John Mason)— Garrlck (5th 

"THE BRUTE"— Lyric (2d weeek). 

"THE CASE OF BECKY" (Francis Starr)— 

Belasco (3d week). 
"THE CHARITY GIRL"— Globe (3d week). 
"THE COUNT OF LUXEMBOURG"— New 

Amsterdam (5th week). 
"THE DAUGHTER OF HEAVEN"— Century 

(1st week). 
"THE GIRL FROM BRIGHTON "—Academy 

(7th week). 
"THE GOVERNOR'S LADY"— Republic (6th 

week). 
THE MASTER OF THE HOUSE"— Lyric (0th 

week). 
"THE MERRY COUNTESS" — Casino (9th 

week). 
"THE NEW SIN"— Wallack's (Oct. 15). 
"THE PASSING SHOW"— Winter Garden 

(l.'ith week). 
"THE PERPLEXED HUSBAND" (John; 

Drew)— Empire (7th week). 
"THE RAINBOW" (Henry Miller)— Grand 

O. H. 
"THE WOMAN HATERS' CLUB"— Astor (2d 

week). 
"TWO LITTLE BRIDES" (James T. Powers) 

—West End. 
"UNDER MANY FLAGS'— Hippodrome (7th 

week). 
"WITHIN THE LAW"— Eltinge (0th week). 

CHICAGO. 

"LOOK WHO'S HERE"— Garrlck (1st week). 
"THE RED WIDOW" (Raymond Hitchcock) 

— G. O. H. (2d week). 
"THE BLUE BIRD'-Lyrlc (3d week). 
"A WINSOME WIDOW" (Frank Tinney) — 

Colonial (6th week). 
1 THE MAN HIGHER UP" — Olympic (5th 

week ) • 
"A MODERN EVE"— Princess (26th week). 
"THE FORTUNE HUNTER"— McVicker's (1st 

week) . 
"THE GARDEN OF ALLAH"— Auditorium 

(7th week). 
"THE GIRL AT THE GATE "—La Salle (7th 

week). 
"KISMET" (Otis Skinner) — Illinois (4tb 

week). 
"FINE FEATHERS"— Cort (7th week). 
"MILESTONES"— Rlackstone (4th week). 
"THE GIRL FROM MONTMARTE"— Chicago 

O H. CM week). 
"KINDLING"— Victoria (1st week). 
"THE MILITARY GIRL" (Lean-Holbrook) — 

American M. H. (8th week). 
"KINEMACOLOR'-Flne Arts (1st week). 
"THE TRAVELING SALESMAN"— Crown. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

"THE RETURN OF PETER GRIMM"— 

Broad 
ZIEOFELDS "FOLLIES"— Forrest 
"THE LADY OF THE SLIPPER"— Chestnut 

St O. H. 
"GYPSY LOVE"—Oarrlek. 
"I.DITTSTANA LOU"- Walnut 
"THE MILLION"— Atlelphl 
"HOVE OF PEACE"— Lyric 
"HAPPY HOOLIGAN"— Grand Opera House. 
"TAMES HOYS IN MISSOURI"— National 
'THE RIGHT OF WAY"— Chestnut St. Stock. 
"ST. ELMO "—American Stock. 



NOTHING NEW IN CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Oct. 9. 
There are hut two openings sched- 
uled for "loop" theaters for next week. 
Margaret Anglin will revive "Green 
Stockings," in which she has played ;n 
Chicago before, and Will Doming will 
come to McVicker's in "The Fortune 
Hunter," which has had two long runs 
in Chicago. 



86TH STREET. 

Business seemed unusually good at 
the 86th Street theatre Tuesday night. 
There wasn't an empty seat when the 
last show started. The bill was quite 
varied and sufficiently entertaining. 
The management is getting rid of 
some of the surplus by paying for the 
ticker which is bringing the house re- 
ports from the baseball games in the 
afternoon and the boxing bouts at 
night. 

No names were played up very 
strong on the outside, although the 
big dancing act of the Ford sisters, 
"Mythology," would no doubt have 
helped matters had they been given 
proper billing. 

Fossatio and his accordion opened 
the show. This musician, sometimes 
booked under the name of Gnome, did 
well with his different numbers. 

Adamini and Brush, with singing, 
were third. Vocal solos by the man 
and violin numbers by the woman 
proved their best. There is no excuse 
for the woman not using some new 
pieces. The man might also vary his 
song program occasionally. He might 
also discard the basket with the vari- 
colored whirligigs, as they bear no 
resemblance to the bananas which he 
tries to sell to persons down in front. 
He should stick entirely to the sing- 
ing. Adamini and Brush are able to 
take care of themselves on the pop 
time by keeping their act abreast of 
the times. 

James Falson and Co. in "The De- 
tective" have a good dramatic for small 
time. Others on the bill were Ames 
and Frances and Ortloff Ors and Co. 
(New Acts). Mark. 



125TH STREET. 

One thing Proctor's 12. r >th Street (with It* 
energetic manager) Is doing Is causing all 
the other Harlem houses to worry. That Is 
nothing more than the extensive outside hill- 
ing of the show each week. 

Manager Allen gets out twenty-four sheets, 
eight sheets, three sheets, window hangers 
and also malls out pamphlets calling atten- 
tion to the show for the coming week. And 
the 125th Is doing a landofBce business each 
week. While the bill the last half of the 
week drooped like a last summer's rose the 
people didn't seem to care much, as several 
of the picture films were of an entertaining 
nature. 

It didn't look as though Bva Allen. "The 
Mystery Girl," and Abe Marks, the prise 
fighter, were any kind of a draw, as neither 
received applause the first time they came 
into view. Both are under New Acts. 

Coyle and Morrell opened In a sketch en- 
titled "Your Credit Is Good." The team 
failed to nail down any marks to Its credit. 
They have a poorly written sketch, poorly 
played. 

O'Mara and Wilson showed after Coyle and 
Morrell and did fairly well with their 
straight dancing turn. De Steffano Bros, wero 
the third. After Marr and Evans had con- 
cluded their acrobatics, Capt. George Stewart 
closed. As the captain had a slow, talky not 
with a few whistling imitations he would have 
done better in an earlier spot. Mark. 



"CINCH" NEEDED "NAME." 

"The Cinch" collaborated for the 
stage by Matthew White and Edgar 
Franklin will shortly go into rehearsal 
under the direction of the Shuberts. 

Ferdinand Gottschalk will have 
charge of the rehearsals and play a 
leading role. 

The Shuberts recruited a company 
for the piece but White ordered it re- 
cast as he claimed there was not a 
single "name" on the list. 



CITY 

The bill at the City the latter half of last 
week was admittedly not up to standard, not 
due to any stinting on the part of the man- 
agement, but an unfortunate absence of "class" 
in the turns. Rhea Keane and Co., Fox and 
DeMay, Helen Lorraine. Sterling and Hltton, 
Abbott and Harris, Lillian Buckingham and 
Co.. New Acts. 

The two remaining acts are Braun 81sters 
and "The Girl With the Angel Voice." The 
Braun girls have a bright little "sister act" 
made up of singing, piano playing and a bit 
of stepping. "The Girl With the Angel 
Voice." with her deceptive billing and spe- 
cial settings, offered no celestial vocalisation, 
but is a sweet, sympathetic cultivated sing- 
er. 

Jolo. 

RIVERSIDE. 

From the way the bill ran last Friday It 
was a big night for different nations. The 
far Orient, Egypt and Arabia were played up 
In the billing. The show had an Egyptian 
Princess (New Acts) and Sle Hassan's Arab 
acrobats. 

The show started with Aubrey Rich and 
Ted Lenore (New Acts). John w. Ransoms 
was the second act to appear. Ransoms, 
with a Teddy Roosevelt makeup, stuck to 
campaign topics. His act gives him a chance 
to sound his audience and at the Riverside 
he found them very progressive. With pol- 
itics red hot now, Mr. Ransoms should bo 
able to get along. Buckley and Moore (New 
Acts). The Arabs gave the show the most 
life of the night. Mark. 



COMEDY CLUB CONCESSIONS. 

A concession has been made to those 
who may apply for admission to the 
Vaudeville Comedy Club between now 
and Jan. 1. The initiation fee has been 
reduced to $25. It will include the 
first year's dues. 

The Comedy Club hopes to secure 
1,000 new members through the reduc- 
tion. 



Genee and Voltini will arrive in New "Schrazarade," with Theodor Kosloff, 
York about Nov. 1. is at the Apollo, Vienna, until Nov. 1. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unlets otherwise noted, the following reports are for the current week. 
JOHN J. O'CONNOR (] HICAGO VAR,KT *' 8 «"caoo office 



(WYNN) 
Representative 



MA.IKSTIC TBEATRK BUILDING 



PALACE (Mort Singer, mgr. ; agent, Or- 
pheum Circuit).— The powers that reign have 
evidently decided to establish the Palace Mu- 
sic Hall as a permanent vaudeville stand, 
for the shows that have been coming along 
In that direction lately are strictly up to 
"Bnuff." A peep at the business register 
shows that the current Monday (both mat- 
inee and night) held the largest amount of 
dollars and cents for that particular day, 
ever crammed Into the house. Since the wise- 
acres have conceded the house to be an Im- 
possibility for vaudeville, It now begins to 
look as though the necessary and lacking es- 
sential was simply comedy. I^aBt week a 
good comedy show brought the money and 
this week a better bill along the same lines 
Is doing likewise. Rock and Pulton arc mo- 
nopolizing the Incandescent*, bringing ;i new 
routine for the currrnt visit and one that 
looks to be the best the couple have ever 
Introduced. Still In its Infancy, the turn has 
reached the perfect point and managed to 
carry off the hit of the bill, something un- 
usual for a vaudeville headllner. A bit of 



French satire Is the best spot In the ve- 
hicle and Incidentally looks the best of any 
comedy dab the Palace patrons have been 
treated to. After experimenting with vaude- 
ville productions on a large scale for some 
time, Kock and Fulton have finally hit the 
nail on the head. After their local engage- 
ment they certainly deserve the calling of the 
best two-people turn In vaudeville. Oolng 
right on down the list from the Musical 
Oordon Highlanders who picked the opening 
spot to Mme. Valleclta and her musical leop- 
ards there doesn't seem to be a flaw In the 
entire program. The Oordons, with their fa- 
miliar routine, gave the afternoon a flying 
start followed by Ellda Morris, who*n In- 
terpretation of a boy runs «■• rond to mighty 
tew. Her costumes and numbers show ex- 
cellent Judgment In '-'•lection and for her 
particular line of v<>rk -i"' stands quite nlone. 
Barnes and Crawford were an early hit and 
for awhile |rnk«a i th"Ui:li th'-y b •-! won 
the prize. The fad tha' ' h-y 1;itr'>du'-*» 
something different in the way of a coni'-dy 
sketch la sure to carry them ''Tough. With 



2X 



VARIETY 




the Improvised comedy delivered by Barnes 
the laughs came in a continuous string. Eddie 
Leonard and Mabel Russell were a valuable 
addition to the extraordinary layout and they 
kept up the good work by a heavy scoru 
Anally ended when Leonard warbled a few old- 
time numbers at the request of the house. 
Nina Morris & Co. had possession of the 
serious section with her dramatic- episode. 
"Tho Yellow Peril," which brought . bark 
thoughts of "The Typhoon." Splendidly set, 
the offering carried everything essential to 
make the turn a success Programmed to 
open the show, Muriel und Francis were shifted 
down to sixth position. This in Itself tells 
a tnle. The two girls combining a charm- 
ing personality, splendid appearance and no 
mean ability, ran up with the topnotchers. 
They displayed ope of the prettiest elster act 
In captivity. Julius Tannen and his chatter 
came before Valleclta and her trained leop- 
ards. Tannen made his usual ImprtBslon. 
The leopards wound up the entertainment fin- 
ishing to a seated house and closing the one 
best bill this old town has seen In one 
whole year. WYNN. 

MAJESTIC (Lyman IT. Glover, mgr. ; agent. 
Orpheum).— Henry E. Dixey headlining with 
monolog In which the ghosts of his former 
successes appear. He was received with af- 
fectionate applause The real hit of the 
bill was made by George Whiting and Sadie 
Run in songs and talk. They present the 
act in such a smooth and adroit manner It 
is a pleasure. Louise Galloway and Joseph 
Kaufman and their company gave a very 
good account of themselves In the sketch, "Lit- 
tle Mother." Edna Aug was called back sev- 
eral times to extend her monolog, and Robert 
J. Webb the elephantine tenor In Joseph 
Hart's "A Night In a Turkish Bath" pleased 
the large audience considerably. The Llet- 
ze] Sisters, trapeze performers, opened the 
bill with a whirl and George Felix caused 
some Utrp. commotion in "The Bov Next 
Door." Ethel May Baarker, a diminutive vio- 
linist, played a good program and was re- 
called three times. Apdale's Animals brought 
the bill to a close to the delight of the 
children. REED. 



AMERICAN MUSIC HALL (Sam P. Or- 
son, mgr.; Shuberts) — "The Mllltarv Girl" 
has been doing a fair business. Smoking 
is permitted and there is a bar attached. 
Sonic Improvements have been made In the 
attraction. 

Al'DITORIUM <H. I'l ich. house mgr.; Wil- 
liam Gorman In charge: K. & E.).~ "The 
Garden of Allah." still proving the big money 
getter of the town. Has three weeks more 
to run 

BLACKSTONE (Augustus Pltmi. Jr. mgr. ; 
K. & E) — "Milestones." meeting with mod- 
erate success. Artistically, out of the or- 
dinary. 

CHICAGO OPERA IIOCSE (G.orgc W. 
Klngsburv. mgr.; K. & E.) "The Girl From 
Montmartre" and A Sire of Life." The 
former has some appeal, especially with Rich- 
ard Carle In the caste. HatUc Williams also 
more or less of a favorite. Business fairly 
good. 

COLONIAL (James .Fay Brady, mgr.: K. & 
E ).— "A Winsome Whlow." with Frank Tln- 
ney as the star, or rather, should be the star. 
is meeting with hetter success. The talk about 
the town has aroused Interest in the old Hoyt 
farce with music attached. Will close late In 
October. 

CORT <C. .!. Hermann, mgr.; Ind.). "Fine 
Feathers" playing on extended time. Still 
drawing well 

GARR1CK (Ashcr L vy. mgr ; Shuberts.) — 
Margaret Anglii ha- not won success In 

Egypt." her in w Edward Sheldon play. If 
will be taken off Saturday an I j.rohnhlv re- 
tired to ihe store hou-e. •<;!■' in Stockings" 
will he rivivd for the io.nl 

ILLINOIS (Will .1 I>a\K in: : K. \- E.C 
Otis Skinner gaining in popularity in "Kis- 
met " The piece has caught r n but is not 
-elling out Business bitter than In any other 
of the "loop" theatres 

LA SALLE OPERA HOPSE (Harrv Askiii. 
mgr.; Ind. I Many signs ,,r p n»we ( | |it> aboir 
The Girl .1 1 the Gate." It began slowly A 
tew chance-; in the book. 

LYRIC i •' A Reed, mgr.: Shubert-- i 
"The Hhie Bird .' not the unqualified sue - • 
anticipatid Highbrow contingent too hinv 
looking after local affairs to do anything inn h 
for a play of this Mir' Business fairly n >od 
Snturdnv afternoon wa« a sell out. 

McVU'KER'S (George Warren mgr . K. £ 
E.).— "Get Rleh Quick Walllngford," well pa; 



ronlzed Well presented, the popular price 
has appealed to those who did net see it at 
the Olympic. "The Fortune Hunter" will fol- 
low. 

POWERS (Harry Chappelle. bus. mgr. ; Ha-ry 
J. Powers, mgr.; K. & E).— "The Now Sin.'" 
pretty well neglected. The play was pro- 
nounced good by the dramatic reviewers, but 
has not been seen by the general public. 

PRINCESS (Will Singer. 
Brady).— "A Modern Eve." 

been 



have 



mgr. ; Shuberts and 
twenty-sixth week, 
made in the cast. 



J. Sullivan, mgr.; Ind.). 
Zlcgfeld. mgr.; Ind. ).-- 



Gleason. 
opened 



mgr. 
in 



; stack). - 
The Com- 



mgr. ; Ind.).— 
Business fair. 



Many changes 
Business, fair. 

STUDEBAKER ( E. 
—Dark. 

ZIEOFELD (W. K. 
Dark. 

COLLEGE (T. C 
New stock company 
muters" Monday. 

CRITERION (Earl Macoy. 
Bernard Daly In repertoire. 

CROWN (Arthur Spink, mgr.; Ind.).— Thos. 
Shea In repertoire did good business. This 
week. "Life's Shop Window." 

GERMAN (Max Hanlsch. mgr.; Ind.).— Ger- 
man stock company meeting with success. 

FINE ARTS (Andreas Dlppel, mgr.; Albert 
Perry, bus. mgr. ).— "The Secret of Suzanne." 
presented by the Chicago Grand Opera Co., 
well attended by the "400." 

GLOBE.— The only signs of life are baking 
powder advertisements. 

IMPERIAL (Joseph Pilgrim mgr. ; Stair & 
Havlln).— Sarah Padden In "Kindling," un- 
usual success. This week, "The White 
Slave." 

MARLOWE (J. J. Schwabe. mgr.; stock).— 
"The Third Degree." fair business last week. 
This week, "The Man of the Hour." 

NATIONAL (John Barrett, mgr.; Stair 5 
Havlln). — Beulah Poynter. fairly successful in 
"Lena Rivers." This week. Thomas Shra. 

WHITNEY (Frank O. Peers mgr.; Ind.t — 
"White slave" pictures, with but a midicum 
of 3Uccess. 

The Wlllard Is celebrating lis second anni- 
versary this week with Thomas Jefferson In 
a tabloid. "Rip Van Winkle." 



Burton Holmes began his annual travelogue 
series at Orchestra Hall this week. He Is 
offering "The West Indies." 

The Fine Arts theatre this week Is de 
voted to klnemacolor pictures, with Harold 
Meade as lecturer. 



The Remington at Kankakee burned to the 
ground Oct. .'{ It will probably be rebuilt. 
It was built last season at a cost of $7.">,- 
000. 



The grand opera school far chorus established 
last season to train Chicago girls for chorus 
work has been discontinued If was a source 
of much publicity but was found too costly. 

Walter McCullough was in town this wer k 
looking for people for his tabloid stock com- 
pany at South Bend. Ind. 

Wilton Lackaye. so if is announced, will 
return to the cast of "Fine Feathers" when 
that play Is taken to New York Frank Sher- 
idan Is now playing the role. 

Lee Kohlmar, in "Whose Helen Are You''" 

while It hesltaNd for a short while at the 

Studebaker is now with "The Woman Haters" 
Club." 



Edward Reck is dire ting the tour of the 
Joseph Sheehan opera c unpnny on its tour 
to the Pacific coast. 

The "Made in Chicairn" show which was 

scheduled for the Coli.-oiim this week, has 

been postponed until next year Interest in 

the sliow was not great among the manu- 
fac'iircrs of Chicago 

John p. O'Rourke formerly treasurer at fhe 
Marlowe, has t;ikm a position with the Big 
Pour railway 



Adolph Meyers lias called in h's tabloid 
oi ' Ea c t Lynnc" and will reorganize the ioiii- 
|\a ti y 

William Anthony M dure ha- gone to New 
York 'o submit the ma nus.-ript of his new 
[day The C st of LivMig." to A H Wo >d.". 

Albert Phillips, at the Marlowe la.-*t season 
and now conducting a stock company at the 



Grand Opera House, Toronto, was Injured In 

a railway wreck last week. Reports have 

reached Chicago that he Is not In a dan- 
gerous condition. 



Will Demlng will have the Thomas W. Ross 
role In "The Fortune Hunter" when It comes 
to McVlckers. 



II. Stutts has organized a musical comedy 
company which will play at the Folly, Detroit. 



Knight & Blerstedt's musical comedy com- 
pany, for six weeks at Rockford, 111., has 
closed there and gone to the Opera House, 
Michigan City, for two weeks. 

Kllroy & Brltton's "Candy Kid" opened '.n 
Puluth Monday. 

Boyle Woolfolk will put a tabloid edition of 
"The Isle of Spice" In rehearsal this week. 

Marian Roddy, featured as the baroness In 
"A Modern Eve" will sing the prima donna 
role in the touring company at Milwaukee 
next week. Milwaukee is Miss Roddy's home 
town She has been on the stage but a few 
months. 



George Beard Is dolns the newspaper work 
for "The Red Widow" at Cohan's Grand Opera 
House. 



Otis Skinner, starring in "Kismet" at the 
Illinois, is staging the pageant in celebration 
of the landing of Columbus that will take 
place at Jackson Park. Oct. 12. 



"By Products." by Joseph N.edlll Patter- 
son, one of the owners of the Chicago Tribune 
and author of several plays, among them "The 
Fourth Estate" will be tried out next week 
at the Academy. Charles W. Collins will 
present the piece. it was put on at the 
American Music Hall two years ago with some 
(success. It has been revised and rewritten. 
Al Rauh who was a member of Harry Bul- 
gers company In "The Flirting Princess" has 
been engaged for one of the roles. 



Leon a Stater, last year with "The Climax," 
has been engaged as leading woman with 
"The Third Degree" on tour. 



Henry Wyatt with the Mabel stock com- 
pany, Is now rehearsing for the role of 
Dopey Doe In "The Divorce Question." which 
will be put on the road. Oct. 20, by Gaskell 
& McVltty. Edward E. Rose Is staging the 
piece. 



Helen Darling has been engaged to sing the 
role of the Baroness In "A Modern Eve" at 
the Princess. She takes the place of Marian 
Roddy, who has been engaged to sing the 
prima donna role In the western company. 



Mrs. Herbert Ingram, Robby Crawford and 
Hemic Adler have been engaged by Sternad. 
Van & Herschel for a big rathskeller act 
that is being put in shape by Virgil P. Ben- 
nett. 



Lou Harrington has been engaged as char- 
acter comedian for the Mabel Stock Company. 



Blanche Mehaffy and Herbert Cyril replaced 
Grace Van Studdlford in the bill at the Ma- 
jestic Milwaukee last week. 



Virgil P. Bennett Is staging the tabloid 
ven-.irm of "Time the Place and the Girl," 
that Boyle Woolfolk will soon put out. 



The Park and Fair department of the "As- 
sociation" has closed down for the winter 
months Ethel Robinson, who has charge 
of thai section of the aeen^y, left Chicago 
last Monday for a month's visit In the easf. 
Ibn Rosenthal ami Tim Keel»r bofh road 
men for the fair department, have also hied 
away to their winter quarters. 

Florence and I>eon De Copta. who were In 
charge, of the music at Like Woods Park. 
Gary, Ind.. this summer, have gone east to 
loin one of Max Snlegl's comnanle- playing 
"The College Widow" through the south. Mr. 
I).' Costa will he the musical director and Mrs. 
He Costa will hive a pnrt in the piece. 

I' J Hermann, manager of the Cort, has 
been in Boston, where he was made a Thirty- 
third degree Mason He Is making the rounds 
r.f New York beforo he returns to Chicago. 



role In "The Girl at the G*te" in place of 
Aneellna Novaalo, who has gone on the road 
to assume the title role In "Louisiana Lou." 

Sousa and his band will be at the Audi- 
torium for a matinee Oct. 13. 



George S. Cullen, In the box office at the 
Columbia theatre, has been stricken with In- 
cipient paralysis and is at the Alexlan hos- 
pital, where he will be compelled to remain 
for some time. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

By AL C. JOY. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; agent 
direct.).— Offedo'a Mannon Opera Co.. one of 
the best of such organizations heard at thp 
Orpheum this season, scored a hit. Frederick 
Andrews' Wonder Kettle. Interested the Or- 
pheum clientele as a novelty. Owen Clark 
magician, clever, has a good lot of tricks and 
keeps^ up a lively running lire of talk. Gray 
and Graham, singing and dancing, went very 
well, familiar frame-up of effective laughing 
number. Ethel Barrymore in J. M. Barries 
playlet "The Twelve-Pound Look." present, 
a dainty comedy. It gave tone and distinc- 
tion to the bill. Mclntyre and Harty, pleased 
on their return. The holdovers are Owen M<- 
Glveney and Williams and Werner. 

EMPRESS.— Ruby Lusby and Willie Dunlav 
with a chorus of l. r > girls in "A Night on a 
Roof Garden." a well staged tabloid musical 
comedy, good ; well handled with well dressed 
chorus and containing amusing comedy. Ward 
Klare and Co. in Twin Flats, well acted 
farce that pleases. Green, McHenry and Deane 
good. Jura. Reed and St. John, Colonial Pas- 
times, only ordinarily entertaining. Ida Rus- 
sell and Grace Church, fair sister act. Three 
Sternards, good. 

PANTAGES (Alex. Pantages gen. mgr ) - 
Payne and McKee. "Chlcklets." well done bit 
of pleasing production. Paul Gordon and 
Rlcca. novelty, well done. Tom Kelly old 
favorite, big return. Keene Trio, good. Franz 
Adelman, scored substantially. Alice Teddy 
makes a return. Her novelty is entertaining. 
Fred Graham. Nellie Dent and Co . "Just 
Like a Man." poor sketch well played. 

COLUMBIA— Mat-kiln Arbuckle, "The Round 
l p.' big business. 

CORT.— Lambardi Grand Opera Co. good 
business. 

SAVOY— Kolb and Dill, with Maude Lillian 
Berrl. In "A Peck of Pickles." Satisfactory 
business. 

ALCAZAR.— "The Nigger." 



Sarah Truax and Thurlow Bergen are In 
their llnal well at Alcazar. James Durkin and 
Maude Fealy open there next week, playing 
six weeks and then Evelyn Vaughn and Ber- 
tram Lytell for ten weeks. 

Beatriz Mlchelena. sister of Vera Mlchelena 
and one time star of "Peggy From Paris." 
after several years In retirement Is going 
back to the stage. She has left San Fran- 
cisco for New York. 

A mortgage recorded last week on the old 
Tivoll property In Edy street for $17.">JMM> 
Indicates that early steps will be taken toward 
rebuilding that famous old opera house. Dr. 
Levy expects to have a permanent operatic 
and musical comedy company here. 

The Nationals' expri'liuenl with melodrama 
looks to be a success. Big business pre- 
vails. 



Ed Armstrong will open the American with 
his musical comedy company next Mondav. 
His brother, Will Armstrong, has been en- 
gaged as principal comedian. 

Tom Chatterton and his wife. Lu-ile Culv. r. 
are back In town after a year of farm life. 
They are considering vaudeville. 



Henry Gille. a show printer won $2.-MHi in 
a lottery here last week. 

George K. Spoor of New York, president of 
the Essenay Film Manufacturing Company, 
arrived here last week and closed a deal for 
the building of a f2. r >.000 producing plant at 
Nilos. a San Francisco suburb. 



Caroline Dixon has assumed the Ingenue 



Maclyn Arbuckle, who Is playing to n 
paclty houses here In "The Round Up" at th* 
Columbia, brings a fine, ripe story from Salt 
Lake City, wh^ie the company appeared a few 



VARIETY 



29 



IT NEVER RAINS BUT IT POURS 

WE HATE TO TELL TALES, BUT IT'S TRUE, THAT WE HAVEN'T HAD A REAL HONEST-TO-GOODNESS HIT SINCE "HONEY MAN/' HOWEVER, 
WE STARTED THIS SEASON WITH A "BANG," AND BESIDES OUR WRITERS FURNISHING US WITH THE TWO FAMOUS SONG HITS THAT 
ARE "CLEANING UP" ALL OVER THE COUNTRY, THEY HAVE ALSO POURED IN RIGHT ON TOP OF THEM, A FEW INFANTS THAT ARE JUST 
BEGGING US TO TAKE THEIR BLANKETS OFF, TO LET YOU, MR. AND MISS PERFORMER, EXPOSE THEM FOR PUBLIC APPROVAL. THEY 
ARE MENTIONED AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS AD. 



IF YOU HAVE NOT PUT ON THAT "OVER-NIGHT" CRAZE, GET IT NOW, WE ARE SPEAKING OF 





THE WRITERS. JOE GOODWIN, JOE MCCARTHY AND FRED FISCHER, HAVE JUST COMPLETED A WONDERFUL PATTER CHOKUS, AND DOUBLE VERSION 

SEND FOR IT, THEN THANK US FOR IT! .,*..«* 

— —_—-^_— -——_—— — — — — — — — 



WAS THERE EVER A MORE BEAUTIFUL AND EFFECTIVE CLIMAX TO ANY BALLAD THAN "LIKE A BABY NEEDS ITS MOTHER, I II \ is HOW I NEED YOU"? 
AND JUST IMAGINE, THAT LINE ONLY RUNS SECOND TO THE BALANCE OF THAT WONDER OF MODERN BALLAD LYRICS, WITH ITS BEAUTIFUL AND APPEAL- 
ING MELODY. 



Ct 



THAT'S 




NEED 



BY GOODWIN. MCCARTHY and piantadosi. special quartette arrangements. SLIDES BY SCOTT & VAN ALTENA. 



ct 



YOU'VE TOLD US YOU WANTED ANOTHER SONG LIKE "HONEY MAN"; HERE IT IS, AND BY THE SAME WRITER. 





EQUALLY AS EFFECTIVE AS "HONEY MAN"; THAT'S SAYING A WHOLE LOT. 

WILL DILLON, WHO HAS TURNED OUT SOME SENSATIONAL HITS IN THE PAST YEAR. HAS HANDED US A PIPPIN— RIGHT UP TO THE MINUTE— NOVELTY RAG 

SONG GOOD FOR ANY SPOT, IN ANY KIND OF AN ACT. 



CC 



TAKE ME TO 



CABARET 



SCOTT * VAN ALTENA MADE A GREAT SET OF SLIDES FOR THIS SONG. 



for the benefit of those who are not acquainted with that laugh getting comedy song, your attention is called to joe goodwin, joe 

McCarthy and al. piantadosi's novelty song, 

"YOUR DADDY DID THE SAME THING FIFTY YEARS AGO" 



A' DOZEN EXTRA CHORUSES; EVERYONE A HIT. WILL BE SENT UPON REQUEST. 



IN ANOTHER MONTH THE FOLLOWING "JUST BORN*' SONG NOVELTIES WILL BE BAWLING ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. WE MERE LY MEN- 
TION THE TITLES NOW, BEAR THEM IN MIND, AS WE WANT TO COME BACK IN A SHORT TIME AND BE ABLE TO SAY "WE TOLD YOU SO" 



"BILLY, BILLY, BOUNCE Your 

BABY DOLL" 

by joe McCarthy, al. bryan and fred fischer. it is a novelty, 
comedy waltz song. different from any song published in years. 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A REAL OLD FASHIONED BALLAD 

"SOMEHOW, I CANT FORGET YOU" 

IS JUST THAT KIND. BY JOE McCARTHY AND AL. PIANTADOSI. 



QUARTETTES HAVE BEEN JUST (RAVING FOR A SONG LIKE 

"HONEY ROSE" 

BY CHRIS. SMITH, who. you rrmrmlirr. Kav« you " 'WAY DOWN AMONG THE 
SI'GAR CANE." JOE McCARTHY AND JOE OOODWIN WROTE A "BULLY" 
LYRIC. 



YOU HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR A SUCCESSOR TO "YIDDISHER RAG." WE 
HAVE IT. AND IT'S BY THE SAME WRITER. HARRY PIANI. THE MELODY 
SURPASSES HIS FORMER HIT. JOl MCCARTHY'S I.YKK HAS A LACGII IN 
EVERY LINE. 

"AT THE YIDDISHER BALL" 

ASK EMMA CASUS AND HEN \VEL< II ABOUT THIS ONE. SEND FOR IT NOW. 



■ rn rriOT feist building *■ ** 

LEU- Ftlol INC., 134 WEST 37th STREET NEW TORK 



Western Office 

145 N. CLARK STREET 



P. S. M. J. STONE and FRED FISCHER WILL WELCOME YOU AT OUR CHICAGO OFFICE 



When anavc r inn <N/"Tfi-NO»H"(s h:\>'<li>i i»- >t -" nii'/ni' 



30 



VARIETY 



weeks ago. When the show played at Salt 
Ijiike two seasons ago a husky, wlldwest Salt- 
laklan named Lomax Informed his friends, 
after he had seen the show, that the cowboys 
and Indians who gambol about Arbuckle were 
phony, that If they had remained long enough 
he would have "shown them up." This year 
when Advance Man Frank Martlneau came 
along and announced the return of "The 
Round Up," Deputy Sheriff Dan Loftus of 8alt 
Lake recalled to him Lomax'a talk. James Ash- 
burn, who plays one of the roles In "The 
Round Up." spent nine years on the ranges 
of Arizona. But he doesn't look like a 
broncho buster off the stage. Loftus con- 
trived a meeting between Lomax and Ashburn. 
Lomax challenged Ashburn to a lariat duel 
and Ashburn roped and tied his rival before 
the latter had even uncoiled his rope. 



The season of Sarah Truax and Thurlow 
Bergen comes to an end this week at the 
Alcazar with the revival of "The Nigger." 

Charles Ackerman, owner of the Republic 
vaudeville and motion picture house, has 
taken a lease on the California theatre, now 
building at the corner of Eddy and Mason 
streets. Fred W. Swanton of Santa Cms Is 
financing the work. The building of the Cali- 
fornia was started about a year ago, the In- 
tention being for the Ferris-Hartman company 
to use it. After the building was well under 
way It was found that funds were lacking to 
complete It. Work then ceased and nothing 
was done until Swanton came to the rescue 
a few weeks ago. The building will be six 
stories and the theatre will have a seating 
capacity of 1,000. Swanton said he expected 
it would be ready to open the first of the 
year. Ackerman will put on vaudeville in the 
California. 



LOS ANGELES 

■y ■ . m MMN1LL. 

ORPHBUM (Martin Beck, gen, mgr. : agent 
direct).— Week 30, The Taklness, ordinary; 
William H. Thompson A Co., excellent; Billy 
Gould A Belle Ashlyn, big hit; Howard's 
Novelty, classy. Holdovers: Bounding Pat- 
tersons, Grace Cameron, Bdmond Hayes A 
Co., EJsa Ruegger. Business brisk. 

EMPRESS (Dean B. Worley. mgr.; agent, 
S. A O— Llna Pantzer, satisfactory; Hol- 
den A Harron, scored ; "The Green House," 
tedious ; Daniels A Conrad, encored ; "Fuji- 
yama," big scenically ; Mile. La Deodlma, 
novelty. Healthy business. 

CENTURY (A. A M. Loewen, mgrs. ; agent. 
Bert Levey).— Dunlap Bros., fair; Princess 
Indeta, ordinary ; Bakes Athletic Girls, 
mediocre; "A Modern Socialist," virile; Fen- 
ner A Fox, entertaining; Greno A Piatt, 
clever. Average attendance moderate. 

MASON OPERA HOUSE (W. T. Wyatt, 
mgr.; K. A E.).— Current, "Officer 6fl6.'" 

MAJESTIC (Oliver Morosco, mgr.; Shuberts) 
—Current, George Damerel In "The Heart- 
breakers." 

BURBANK (Oliver Morosco, mgr.).— Dramatic 
stock. Current, "A Dollar Did It." 

BELASCO (Oliver Morosco, mgr.).— Dra- 
matic stock. Current, "The Money Moon." 

AD0LPHU8 (Workman A Sturm, mgrs.).— 
Stock burlesque. 

PRINCESS (Geo. B. Ryan, mgr. ) .—Stock 
burlesque. 

Harry J. O'Neal declares he has had his 
fill of cabaretlng and has closed at Jahnke's 
Oafe to Join Lew Cantor's "Merry Kids," 
which went over from Pantage's circuit to 
the Bert Levey chain and opened last week 
at Bakersfleld. O'Neal is figuring on going 
back to Chicago via the "kid act" route. 

A new act to open last week at Bakersfleld 
for Levey 1b Gene Post and his Ginger Girls. 
Rosle Cohen, an energetic chorister at the 
Olympic, when that theatre was on the map 
here, is In the line-up. 

Robert McKlm, late leading man here at 
the Orpheum with Maude O'Deile, opened Oct. 
at the Empress, Salt Lake, in a new sketch 
by Walter Montague and entitled "A Persis- 
tent Wooer." 



Ralph Stuart, the new Burhank leading 
man. and lone McGrane, Kenneth Stuart and 
Richard Allen, the other new Morosco stock 
recruits, made their initial bows to Los An- 
geles theatregoers Oct. 7 In the new comedy, 
"A Dollar Did It." 

Mrs. Beatrice Hubbell Plummer, soprano, 
and well known here In musical circles, has 
gone to Chicago, where she will form a com- 
bination with Mary Turner Salter, pianist 
and song composer, for a concert tour. 



Orrln Johnson played several performances 
last week at the Belasco under the care of 
a physician. Ulcer of the stomach is report- 
ed to have been responsible for his indispo- 
sition. 



The organization of a local branch of the 
Drama League of America was effected Sept. 
27. These officers were chosen: President, 
Mrs. Clove ; vice-president. C. C Parker ; 
secretary. Gertrude Workman ; treasurer, M. 
M. Grlgg. 

It is understood Marguerite Leslie, the 
English actress and leading woman at the 
Belasco, returns to Now York City following 
the conclusion last week of her engagement 
in "The Gamblers." 

Reece Gardner, a former member of "Pop" 
Fischer's old musical-comedy stock company 
at the Lyceum ; Frances White, familiarly 
known here as the "splash me" girl, and not 
so very long ago In the chorus at the Adol- 
phus. together with several other footllght en- 
tertainers, have migrated to Portland, where 
they become members of Keating A Flood's 
Btock musical show at the Lyric. 






The 7th 

Anniversary 

Number 






WILL BE PUBLISHED 
IN DECEMBER 



Preferred position for advertisements 
may be secured by ordering now 



Harry Davidson was here last week "bias- 
ing the trail" for Paul Armstrong's "A Ro- 
mance of the Underworld." 



William J. Hurlburt, author of "The Fight- 
ing Hope," is expected here this week from 
the east. The object of his visit is said to 
be chiefly to direct the production of one and 
possibly two new plays that are to be pre- 
miered at one of the local Morosco play- 
houses. 



Another prominent easterner expected this 
week Is Mort H. Singer. 



PHILADELPIA. 

By GBORGB M. YOUNG. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordanv mgr.; agent, U. B. 
O.).— Mrs. Lily Langtry headlines here this 
week, presenting a sketch, "Helping the 



Cause," poorly constructed and badly played, 
so that It added little or nothing that was en- 
tertaining or amusing to the bill. The con- 
trast when Pat Rooney and Marlon Bent fin- 
ished their singing and dancing skit, "At the 
News Stand," was very noticeable. The two 
received a reception when they appeared and 
held the house amused right up to the last 
minute and could have gone further. Pat fin- 
ished by pulling Kelly into the act and Kelly 
did some steps and made a speech that was 
funnier than Mrs. Lantry's efforts to make love 
to the jail doctor. If they don't watch Kelly 
he will be an actor some day. The audience 
was so well pleased with the Rooney and Bent 
skit that all but a very few remained long 
enough to enjoy the clever bar act of the 
Eugene Trio. Since Fox and Van Auken, the 
Mario-Dunham and some of the old timers 
have disappeared from vaudeville, a bar act 
of this kind is a real treat. The comedian 
holds up his end of the act In creditable style. 
The act went big In the closing position. The 
classy musical act of the WUUs Family struck 



IS/IIVI 



1^ and Co- 



Played Colonial Theatre, Erie, Pa., week Sept. 23. Presenting a character skit of 
the Fair Ground Fakirs, by Edith Haroke. entitled "BEHIND THE GRAND STAND," 
Introducing buslneus of erecting- fortune telling outfit, tent, banners, etc., ballyhoo with 
second sight. 

Constable sloughs Joint at finish for working without license. 

Bill consisted of Tom Nawn A Co., Ha Grannon, Johnston, Howard & Llsette, Four 
Klllarney Girls, Parisian Dancing Four and Emma Sharrock St Co. 





Rogers act. I am now playing my own 
act under its old and original title 

Direction JACK FLYNN 



I am not playing the black 
face role with the Dorothy 

"DICK'S KIDS" 

ALL OTHERS ARE COPYISTS 

(Signed) CARL STATZER 



McDEVITT, KELLY 

and IRENE LUCY 

"THE PIANO MOVERS AND THE ACTRESS" 
This Week (Oct. 7). Fifth Ave., New York 

Direction THOMAS FITZPATRICK 



When anewering advertisement* lindly mention VARIETY. 



a responsive chord. It Is Just such an act 
which gives some of the strangers to vaude- 
ville a Jolt of surprise. The quartet Inject 
onough of the raggy music to smarten things 
up, hut hold close enough to the classical 
stuff to reach the highbrow, and their muslo 
was warmly appreciated Monday night. The 
younger girl does not dress as smartly as she 
could, even though she Is trying to retain her 
girllshness. Wilbur Mack and Nella Walker 
contributed their familiar singing and talking 
sketch, securing excellent results through the 
way it was handled. They have a nice, breezy 
little skit and made the most of the material 
at hand. Bert Terrell, a newcomer, won a 
liberal amount of favor with his Dutch songs 
and yodllng. He presents a likable person- 
ality, and while his songs are oddly reminiscent 
of olden times, they are probably new. It i« 
always easy for a yodler, but Terrell is much 
better than a lot we hear and was much en- 
Joyed. "A Night on the Boulevard" with ths 
Langdons was a gseat, big laughing hit They 
have worked In some new hits since last seen 
and have a dandy comedy sketch now. Pretty 
stage setting got them a hand before the act 
started. Richards and Kyle pulled down their 
share for an early spot with the "Regular 
Club Fellow" skit. There are a few well 
worn gags used which might be freshened 
up. but they put their stuff over in a pleas- 
ing way. Delmar and Delmar were on first 
with some new tricks In the way of head- 
stands and teeth lifts, doing very nicely in a 
rather hard spot for this bill. 

NIXON (F\ O. Nlxon-Nlrdllnger, mgr.- 
agent, Nlxon-Nlrdllnger Agency).— This was 
to have been the opening week for the 8. and 
C. acts, but no announcement regarding It has 
been made. It Is not known whether any of the 
acts on the bill have been routed over the 8. 
and C. time, but several of them combined 
to make up a bill that had the house in good 
humor throughout. And it was some big 
house Tuesday night. The "pop" vaudeville 
idea is pretty horoughly planted In West Phil- 
adelphia and the Nixon appears to get its 
share of the patronage. By the time the first 
show ended Tuesday night every seat was 
filled and there were several rows of standees 
waiting for the second show to start. Nick's 
Bight Skating Girls was ths big feature of the 
bill and In the closing spot made a very showy 
number which was appreciated warmly. The 
girls are clever on the rollers and being nicely 
costumed make a pretty stage picture In whirl- 
ing formations. All the girls are proficient 
in ekatlng and it makes a rather pretentious 
number for the big small time. Five Merry 
Kids was another act which caused consider- 
able amusement, though much of their comedy 
efforts has been pretty well worn. The act 
looks as If It had been picked from one of 
the many "school-room" acta so familiar In 
vaudeville. Bach of the five boys has a solo 
number, but they do little of the harmony 
thing. The rough house comedy stuff seems 
to go here, however and the 'kids" did very 
well. When In doubt how to start something 
In a vaudeville house, just yodle and you are 
sure to be a hit. The yodle Just pulled Jere 
Sanford through after he had made little head- 
way with some talk. Sanford sticks to an old 
number for his yodllng, but those In front 
warmed right up to him In a way to show 
they liked It. "The Fire Escape" sketch used 
on the ble time by Charles Rlchman got over 
better with the "pop" audience keeping the 
laughR going right steadllv. Charles Deland 
and Co. present the sketch and Mr. Deland 
handles the principal role with good effect, hav- 
ing light help from Marie Carr. The sketch 
still has the poor finish noted when Rlchman 
played It. Parodies helped Collins and Woop- 
man through to a fair sized hit. The boys 
need some better talk to keep pace with other 
acts which they have followed and the com- 
edian half of the team might hunt something 
fresher and more original for laughs than the 
hat-tipping to the audience. The Cliff Bally 
Trio offered a good, Uvelv comedy acrobatic 
turn for nn opener and did nicely. 

VICTORIA (Jay Mastbaura, mgr.; agent. 
Jules E. Aronsonl— Good bill this week, the 
honors being liberally distributed. The "Avia- 
tor Girl" with Katherlne Potter doing the 
aviating was featured and scored nicely. A 
couple of single numbers started her along 
and then she slipped Into the machine for a 
trip through the air. It makes a novel of- 
fering and the Market Street throng liked the 
act and the aviator. Laurie and Green nut 
over a well-liked slnsrlng and talking skit. 
They have a lively little number and handle 
their stuff for good results. Elsie 9tlrk proved 
somewhat of an enlarma Those in front didn't 
know whether If was a female impersonator 
or not. but sfter telling some stories and sing- 
ing a couple of sonars in double-voice range 
during which the male voice was hetter than 
the female. Elsie went Into the air for a tran- 
eze act displaying some female curves. The 
act Is missing something hv not going in for 
the protean thing. A suitable sketch to show 
off the double voire would be much better than 
working In "one." and even the trapese bit 
might be dronned. With a snanpv working 
singing and talking act, Lloyd and Gibson won 
a liberal amount of favor. The onenlnsr talk 
might be Improved upon. The AM-a Sisters 
are very likely English girl* ng with an 

accent and using song- '" :rv. wl^i prominent 
English comediennes. •*••>- "»<enMv doing 

a "single" on the smj.'i mh< ' '•-'■hing with 
an American "rag" they pie-w < t> r Strong- 
hearts do weight lifting, gettln r ,iv.-..* f om the 
ordinary routine. The ••** Is -jot .<♦:' r'ressed. 
A little improvement In thi» wnuM • :,. the set 
for It should pass nice!.-' nr a feature on the 
small time. The Coltons offered their familiar 
act and got some laugh*. They need new 
material 

PALACE (Jay Mastbaurn. mer : ^ren* Tules 
E. Aronson). — The Norvol* fear -red *' hill 
this week with their tank act. t *:■».■>?• reit* 
maklnsr a showy number for th< 
not reach above the ordlinf 
tank actors have a routln * 

hut make them show nleel nl 
un Its end of the bill. f'o'llr 
pleased with their old style ■ -»,*i n . 



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VARIETY 



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"THE GHOST OF THE VIOLIN" 



Words by BERT KAL MAR 
Music by TED SNYDER 



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ing act, with Dan Collins yodllng still holding 
on and getting hiin some reward. The Morette 
Sisters have the making of a nice little musi- 
cal act for the small time when they dress 
it properly Just now they give themselves a 
bad start through making a poor appearance 
in the velvet dresses and pink stockings worn. 
The kaickerbocker suits are better. The music 
pleased those In front. Johnnie Fields told 
some gags and sang parodies on popular songs 
which met with fair results. A "kid" act 
was offered by Mr. and Mrs. Talcott. The bill- 
ing make it hard for this couple. It may 
sound nice to them if they are newlyweds, but 
for a "kid" act it Is wrong. The girl gets 
by with her stuff, but the man is a bit shy on 
his. They can build up from the opening, 
starting with the billing. Zeno and Zoa do 
contortion tricks along familiar lines, with one 
or two tricks in which the woman acts as an 
understander standing out. She handles the 
work well and does a Baggeson twist which 
the man claims has never been done by any 
one before. His comedy is some shy. Nichols 
and Logan, colored, offered a singing and talk- 
ing skit of ordinary merit. 

BROAD (Nixon & Zimmerman, mgrs. ; K. A 
K.).— Dave Warfleld in "The Return of Peter 
Grimm," very warm welcome. The house was 
well filled, the play met with unmistakable 
approval and the press was strongly favorable 
in its reviews. 

OARRICK (Nixon & Zimmerman, mgrs.; K. 
4 B.).— Second and last week for " Get- Rich - 
Quick Walllngford." Business light. 

LYRIC (Shuberts).— Business held up well for 
Blanche Ring all last week and this, the sec- 
ond and last week of "The Wall Street Girl." 
Doing well with strong opposition. Between 
watching ball games and learning how to act 
his part. Will Rogers is a busy actor these 
days. 

WALNUT (Frank Howe, Jr., mgr.; K. A B.). 
-"The Searchlight," second and last week. 
Poor business. 



The "Historical Pageant," a tremendous 
spectacular production given in the open in 
Palrmount Park, has hit the show, business 
pretty hard this week. 

F q. Nlxon-Nirdlinger and Frederick Leo- 
pold, bouse manager at the Nixon, have In 
preparation a novelty quartet offering with big 
scenic features. It will be ready for a show- 
ing very soon. 

BOSTON. 

BY J. GOOLTZ. 

80 Summer Street. 

KEITH'S (Harry B. Gustln, mgr.; agent. 
U. b. O.).— A diversified bill this week made 
good. Attendance capacity. Marshall Mont- 
gomery, headllner; Genaro A Bailey, big act; 
Providence Players, good; Five Martelle, closed 
well; Big City Four, good; Ma-Belle A Sylvan 
Ballet, went woll; Bert Melrose, scream; Ed- 
wards ft Irene, pleased; Zanettos, opened good; 
pictures. 

PARK (W. D. Andreas, mgr.; K. A B.).— 



After a Cleaning Out and Overhauling the 

"Oriental Burlesquers" 

Is now rated in the No. 1 Grade 

It took a little time and patience. Still the business ell over is 
W. C. CAMERON, Manager phenomenal 



Dixon 



and 



Fields 



Playing Orpheum Circuit 

Management, MAX E. HAYES Putnam I si M Jusj, New Tilt 





r. GEORGE STANLEY 

Presenting his Original Character Impersonation of 

"The Ante ■ Bellum Darkey" 

Now being featured with hip success over the Inters tate Circuit 

NEXT WEEK (Oct 13), MAJESTIC, HOUSTON 





SHORT VAMP SHOES 

^^^^TradeMark^^^^ 



For STAGE. STREET AND EVENING 

(New Catalog en Request; 

54 WEST list ST. (Bet. Bway A Oth Ave.) \ u - -„- 
■'WAY. si 41* ST. (Churchill a Block) / ■■ T - e,,T 



"Maggie Pepper," with Rose Stahl, Is selling 

well. 

BOSTON (Al Levering, mgr.; K. A B.).— 
"Robin Hood" going well for second week. 

TRHJMONT (John B. Schofflcld, mgr.; K. A 
E.).— "A Polish Wedding" opened big for 
two weeks' stay. 

PLYMOUTH (Fred Wright, mgr.; Llebler).- 
"O liver Twist" In last week. 

HOLLIS (Charles B. Rich, mgr.; K. A E.).— 
"The Talker." Business only fair. Closing 
local engagement this week. 

COLONIAL (Thomas Lothian, mgr.; K. A 
H.).— "The Quaker Girl" leading the way for 
box office receipts. Sixth week, 

SHUBERT (E. D. Smith, mgr.; Shubert).— 
"Broadway to Paris" with Gertrude Hoffmann. 
Opening delayel until Thursday night. More 
time needed to prepare. Billed big. Good ad- 
vance sale. 

MAJESTIC (E. D. Smith, mgr.; Shubert).— 
"Little Boy Blue" opened well. Big advance 
sale. Boomed by local Sotch societies. 

CASTLE SQUARE (John Craig, mgr.).— 
Stock: "The Aviator." 

ST. JAMES (M. H. Guleslan, mgr.).— Stock: 
'The Dawn of a Tomorrow." 

CASINO (Charles Waldron, mgr.).— Bur- 
lesque: "London Belles." 

GAIETY (George Batchellor, mgr.).— Bur- 
lesque: "The New Girlie Show." 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (C. Lothrop, mgr.). 
—Burlesque: "Merry Maidens." 

A bargain sale of seats Is being held at the 
Boston Opera House, for purchasers of season 
tickets. A fifty-cent discount Is allowed to 
buyers of $2 seats, If purchased before Nov. 2. 

Three new musical shows In Boston this 
week. "A Polish Wedding" at the Tremont, 
Is the first Cohan A Harris show of the sea- 
son; "Little Bey Blue" at the Majestic; and 
"From Broadway to Paris" at the Shubert, with 
Gertrude Hoffmann. 



Dr. Karl Muck has Btarted rehearsals of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Adeline Genee and her ballet are coming to 
the Boston Opera House for one performance 
evening of Nov. 16. Plans were made origi- 
nally for an afternoon performance, but were 
changed this week. 

Fire in the Jefferson summer home at 
Buzzard's Bay destroyed many valuable books, 
papers and pictures, the property of the latf 
To-".*ph Jefferson, last week. The Are ntarted 
in the stable. 



Reginald De Koven arranged to hear a num- 
ber of students of local operatic schools who 
have written him for a chance to be heard. The 
tearing was set for Thursday afternoon at the 
Boston theatre. 



William Coartlelgh and Grace Elllnon will 
have the leads In "Coming Home to Roost." 
the new Edgar Selwyn play that haw Its pre- 
mier at the Hollls Street theatra n<>xt week. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention VARIETY. 



Y2 



VARIETY 



" SS'SB" NEW COMEDY PRESENTED IN A NEW WAY 








IM 




Are showing their act. Consists of Repartee and Song. 

A Credit to Any House. 



II 



MARRIED 

Copyright applied for 



19 



Proctors 23d St., First Half tf Week (Oct. 14) 
Procter's 125th St. Last Half 



A new play. "On the Level," will be put on 
at the St. James theatre next week. It U I 
one-act affair and was submitted to M. H. 
Gulpsian, the manager, with a number of 
manuscripts. 



The Henry B. Harris management baa three 
companies in Boston at the present time. "The 
Talker," at the Hollls. "The Quaker Girl" at 
i he Colonial, and "Maggie Pepper" at the 



Park theatre. 



It is expected that a considerable sum of 
money will be gained at the monster benefit 
that Is being arranged to take place at the 
Boston theatre, for the Henry B. Harris Home 
for Stage Children, shortly to be established 
on Lolig Island. The benefit will be held 
Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 29. Professionals 
from every theatre In the city will take part. 
The movement for the erection of the home has 
been afoot for aome time. 



ColumbuB Day will be celebrated here with a 
big parade Saturday. Last year the line of 
march interfered with people who wanted to 
attend theatres. Mayor Fltagerald has mad* 
arrangements this year for an opening In the 
parade line so that people who desire to gain 
an eu trance to the playhouses will bo able to 
do so easily. Most of the theatres lead off 
Tremont street, or in that vlclnky, and that 
is where the parade will be held. 

For a few hours last week It looked as If a 
breach In the placid affslrs of the local thea- 
tre managers would take place. Some one 
connected with the advertising end at the Boa- 
ton theatre succeeded in getting some plac- 
ards Into the windows of local stores adver- 
tising the fact that "Robin Hood" was play- 
ing at the Boston, and also giving the hours 
of the performance. As there Is an agreement 
between the managers against window dU- 
playe, a fearful howl was put up. It la un- 
derstood that the agreement calls for a heavy 
fine against the member of the organisation 
who violates the rule of window advertising. 
Al Levering, manager of the Boston, got his 
"Sherlock Holmes" busy and they discovered 
that a local music house that has the handling 
of the "Robin Hood" music, was responsible. 
For a time Al Strassman. the fellow who la 
here boosting the show, was under suspicion, 
but ho cried "I am not guilty" in auch a loud 
tone and so often that be succeeded In proving 
his innocence. 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra will give 
its Cambridge concerts this year at Saunder's 
theatre, Harvard University, beginning Oct. 17. 

Mme. Calve and her husband, Slgnor Galileo 
Qaspard, a tenor, will give a concert at 
Symphony Hall Sunday, Dec. 20. 

George Arliss In "Disraeli" will follow "Oli- 
ver Twist" at the Plymouth next week. 

ATLANTIC CITY. 

By 1. B. PULASKI. 

SAVOY (Harry Brown, mgr. ; agent. U. B. 
().).— Thomas A. Wise ft Co. in a condensed 
version of "A Gentleman From Mississippi." 
nicely received ; should easily be good for 
a season in vaudeville ; "Cheyenne Days," 
whooped 'em up some, enjoyed ; Burns & Ful- 
ton, dancing took them over; Charles F. 
Semon. corralled a big slice of applause ; 
Smythe & Hartman, very pleasing; Lancton, 
Lucler & Co., good ; Harry Tsuda, exceptional 
equilibrist. 

MILLION DOLLAR PIER (J. L Young, 
mgr. ; Wister Grookett. bus. mgr. ).— M. P. 

STEEL PIER (.1. Bothwell, mgr.).— M. P. 

CRITERION (I. Notes, mgr.).— M: P. 

BIJOU DREAM (Harry Drown. Jr. mgr.).— 
M. P. 

CITY SQUARE (E. OKeefe, mgr.).— M. P. 

ROYAL (W. R. Brown, mgr.).— M. P. 

CENTRAL (Karrer & Short, mgrs.).— M. P. 

APOLLO (Fred E. Moore, mgr. ; agent, K. 
& E.).-"A Rich Mans Son," premiere (7-9) ; 

The Little Millionaire" with Charles King 
(10-12). 



The Steeplechase Pier is closed and will 
not reopen until next Easter. 

The Steel Pier will close Oct. 26. not to 
open until Christmas. This will leave the 
Million Dollar Pier as the only pier open. 



The first three days of next week at the 
Apollo "The Girl In the Taxi." The last half 
will see the premiere of "The Argyle Case" 
with Robert lllllianl starred. 



The ordinance created over a year ago which 
prohibited the showing of moving pictures ex- 
cept in fireproof structures (or theatres) be- 



came effective Oct. 1 and notices were sent out 
by the police to four places ordering them 
to close. The order affects two places on 
the Boardwalk and several on Atlantic avenue. 
The newer theatres on the latter thorough- 
fare are in compliance with the law. The 
proprietors of some of the doomed places 
have threatened to take the matter to court. 



Alex Porter, 'the jolly 8cot" whose home 
19 here and who has been playing in the 
east this season, sailed last week for England 
where he has been booked for three months. 



is bent upon the boy marrying a girl in 
his own "set." This places the mother 
in a position of not knowing whether to 
stand by the son or father. The son wins 
in the end. The acting of Julia Ralph was 
very good as was that of James Elverton. 
These two had the bultc of the dialogue, of 
which there is an overabundance. There was 
nothing new in theme presented and nothing 
startling In the situations. There were, how- 
ever, quiet a lot of bright lines. The second 
act was the best and won big applause. The 
last act dragged badly until MLsa Halrh 



Extra!! 



DAILY 

SCANDAL!!! 



Extra!! 



"Casey Jones Went Down on the Robert E. Lee" ! ! 

The new idea in a coon song. GET IT. 

"Beautiful Doll, Good Bye" 

The Raging Western Hit. 
(Introduced by Fay, Two Coleys and Fay.) A great single, 

double and patter song. 

"When I Dream of Old Erin" 

(The #10,000 Irish Ballad.) Introduced by Elsie Murphy 

"I Don't Know Why I Love You" 

(And You Don't Love Me.) Featured by Belle Story. Ask her. 

"I've Been Feeding the Chickens" 

(Sophie Tucker's One Best Bet.) 

"Belle of the Plaza" 

(A Great Mexican Novelty.) 

Published by 

FRANK CLARK MUSIC CO. 

401 Randolph Building 145 N. Clark Street 

FLO JACOBSON, Mgr Prof Dopt. CHICAGO, ILL. MARVIN LEE, Vice-President 



NOTICE!!! 

FRANK CLARK, formerly General Western Manager of 
Waterson-Berlin-Snyder Co. (Ted Snyder Co.), has succeeded 
MARVIN LEE, and hereafter the firm will be known as the 

FRANK CLARK MUSIC CO. 

Will be glad to greet all old friends and make new ones. 



Monday night James Forbes presented a 
new show which he wrote and staged him- 
self, entitled "A Rich Man's Son." It Is a 
comedy In three acts with the locale In New 
Ycrk City. The story deals with a man 
from the west who has beeo very successful 
In business In the metropolis and bis wife 
has joined him, after spending a year In 
Omaha without her husband and son who 
had been In college. The son, about to 
enter business In his father's office, falls 
in love with the secretary. But his father 



came on the stage. If the show Is to rt iy 
the last act will need rewriting. 

NEW ORLEANS 

By O. M. ■AMITBL. 

CRESCENT (T. C. Campbell, mgr. ; K. & 
E.).— "The Call of the Heart." 

LYRIC (C. D. Peruchl. mgr.).— Peruchl- 
Oypzene Stock Co. In "Hazel Klrkc. ' 

QREENWALL (J. J. Holland, mgr.).— Dlnk- 
lns and Stair Burlesquers. 



MAJESTIC (L. B. Sawyer, mgr.).— Tyson 
Extravaganza Co. 

LAFAYETTE (Abe Seligman, mgr.).— Pic- 
tures and vaudeville. 

ALAMO (Wm. Queringer, mgr.).— Pictures 
and vaudeville. 



ORPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.; direct) 
— Belle Onra, superior trapeslste; Delmore & 
Light, did little; Herbert A Goldsmith, thor- 
oughly appreciated; Sully A Hussey, scream; 
Dlgby Bell in diverting horseplay; Trovato. 
hit; Salerno, unsurpassed. 

TULANE (T. C. Campbell, mgr.; K. A E.). 
— "The Rose Maid," tuneful and engaging 
operetta, adequately rendered, good business. 

DAUPHINS (Henry Green wald, mgr.; Shu- 
bert). — "The Balkan Princess," musically 
prepossessing and excellently interpreted, 
drawing well. 

In the' matter of receipts, the first month 
at the Orpheum haa been highly satisfactory. 

Walter S. Baldwin Is expected here this 
week, when It is believed an arrangement will 
be effected whereby the Baldwin-Melville 
Stock Co. will be brought Into the Winter 
Garden. 

The La. Amusement Co. will erect a $30,- 
000 theatre at Baton Rouge. 

John Rucker's Musical Comedy Co. is at 
the Temple, a theatre catering exclusively 
to colored people. 

Greenwood. Miss., is to have a new the- 
atre. It will be on Church street. 

The Star theatre at Natchez, Miss., was 
sold at public auction recently. 

Lee Rellly, advance agent of "The Balkan 
Princess," engaged Walter R. Brown to as- 
sist him In booming the show, the current 
attraction at the Daupblne. 

Lew Rose's tented colored minstrel show 
has gone Into winter quarters. 

Lockport, La., has been experiencing rainy 
weather. The opera house there Is situated 
a mile from the depot. As the depot holds 
but six persons, the manager of the opera 
house is warning companies booked in Lock- 
port not to forget their umbrellas. 



ST. LOUIS 



■r John b. MNBrr. 

COLUMBIA (H. D. Buckley, mgr.). — Orape- 
wln A Chance A Co., "The Awakening of Mr. 
Pipp," strong headllner; Lolo, a Sioux Indian 
remarkably clever; Wynn A Russon, scored 
decidedly; Stewart Sisters A Escorts, dandy 
opener; Hopkins A Axtell, very entertaining; 
Harry Atkinson, scored; Wilson's Comedy Cir- 
cus, well received; The Rial's close a well- 
balanced bill to big business. 

HIPPODROME (Frank L. Talbot, mgr.).— 
Onetta, Dervish dances, headlined to advan- 
tage; Tom Brantford, honors; The Rose of 
Persia Co., scored; Dave Marion, Jr. A Gypsy 
Darrell, success; Napoll Four, did nicely; J. 
Lee Klare A Co., very good; Four Milanars. 
clever; The Cabaret Review, applause; Dra- 
ko's Dogs, novel; Alvo Trio A Carman & Rob- 
erts finish a long program to crowded houses. 

PRINCESS (Dan Flshell. mgr.). — Princess 
Maids in "Mixed Pickles." headlined to much 
laughter; Noerterman A Cable, very interest- 
ing; Mather A Freeman, amusing; Increased 
business. 

KING'S (F. C. Meinhardt, mgr.). — Five Co- 
lumbians, featured; Al. Abbott, very big; Le 
Clair A Sampson, entertaining; Benard & 
Roberts, very good. 

SHENANDOAH (W. J. Flynn, mgr.).— Gross 
A Jackson and Robert Hall divided first hon- 
ors; May Hlnk & Co.. good; Mary K. Hill, 
much applause; Wood's Animals, well liked. 

OLYMPIC (Walter Sanford, mgr.). — la well- 
acted play Charles Cherry in "Passers-By" 
scored; good business. 

CENTURY (W. D. Cave, mgr.). — Thomas 
W. Ross In "The Only Son," opened this pop- 
ular playhouse to crowded house. 

SHUBERT vMelvllle Stolz, mgr.). — "The 
Whirl of Society," with Al. Jolson A Melville 
Ellis, played to a well-filled house. Scenic- 
ally and In costumes as well as chorus is up to 
the minute. 

AMERICAN (D. E. Russell, mgr.). — Al. H. 
Wilson In "It Happened in Potsdam" has a 
winner; good business. 

GAKH1CK (Mat Smith, mgr.).— Valeska Su- 
ratt opened her final week in "The KIM 
Waltz" to a large audience. 



MURIEL-FRANCES 



«• 



tt 



JUST TWO GIRLS 

A Tremendous Success at PALACE Thea're, 
Chicago This Week (Oct. 7) 

Moved from 2d to 6th Position. 

Just finished touring the Orpheum Circuit 

Direction PAUL DURAND 



When answering advertisements kindly i.ention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



33 



CHARLES HORWITZ 



Astbor of the heat Playlets aad Sketches 
,- Vaudeville. Ill* rwrd apeak* far Itself. 
Uandreds *f meMm. Don't experiment 
"itb others. Got • Horwtts aketck. Call, 

write or telephone. 

CHARLES IOIWITI, 

144)2 Brood way (Boom tlf>. Now York- 
pesae *M» Murray Hill. ^^^^ 

l«ir phone t6t6 Bryant. 

W. H. BUMPUS 

TRANSFER 

Bagage Called for and Choekod to all 

Railroad* and Steamboats. 
Stand, 8. B. Cor. 43d St. and 8th Are. 
storage— -los 11th Are., bet. 58d A 54th Sts. 
omr< w-27H W. 4H.1 St. NEW YORK. 

I. MILLER, 1554 Broadway. >•£■ 

M a nufacturer 
o f Thoatrtoal 
o o t ■ ill 
Shoes. 

CLOO. Ballst 
and Acrobatlo 
Shoes a spo- 
clalty. All work 
made at short 
notice. 
Writs for Catalog; 4. 



Tat sSM-7 Cstlaaa 

202 

W.23 q =°S 
M.Y 




L 





Hirsch Sample Shoe Co. 

STREET .-THEATRICAL FOOTWEAR 



Satin Slippers, 



$3.00 



Mads To Order To Match CO CA 
Any Shads Gown ?*a9U 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

4S4-4M SIXTH AVENUE NEW YORK 

Between 24th and 26th Streets 



LA SALLE (Oppenhelmer Bros., nigra.). — 
"Confession" played by a good company 
amused big gathering. 

STANDARD (Leo Reichenbach. mgr.). — Sam 
Rice ft Hi3 "DafrydiUs," with Ah Ling Foo. 
the Chinese illusionist as an a<1d<-d attraction, 
pleased a crowded house. 

GAYETY (Chas. Walters, mgr.).— "Ameri- 
can Beauties," with an extra large chorus 
and Cook & Lorenz drew good business. 



D. E. Russell, after nine years, resigned as 
manager of the American theatre and For- 
est Park Highlands to accept a position as 
personal representative of Frank L. Talbot's 
Interests in Chicago. 



LEST YOU FORGET 
WE SAT IT TIT 



CROSS 

LETTER HEADS 

Contracts, Tickets. Envelopes, Free Samples, 

BTAGE MONET, 15e. Book of Herald Cote, Me. 
pDflCC PRINTING COM PANT PUIPAfifl 
bHUOd M] g DEARBORN ST. bHIbAaU 




Ws handle a fall line of theatrical wigs la 
qualities of from IS to 9100 each. 

THE WIGGERY 

J. NEGREACOrj, 
•4 EAST MADISON STREET. CHICAGO. 



COSTU 




THEATRICAL 

Tel. tSSS Mans; HIM. 

M. SI MO WITCH 

Bnrlesqne and Vaudeville Ceetomee 
tl Wmmt »7th Of V»w Y«fw CWt 




HESS 



HIGH GRADE 

MAKEUP 

"Hat Haw Cheap 

but Haw Good" 

Sold by Leading Druggists 

Cottumm, Hair Stores and 

Dspt. Stores 



CHAS. H. SMITH «™» 

American Theatre Bid*.. New York. 
Cars ROLAND WEST. Phone, S900 Bryant. 




MME. 

BELMONT 

MILLINER TO 
ALICE LLOYD 

503 Fifth Ay. 



Entrance on 42nd Street 
Phone, Bryant 4774 NEW YORK 



We are now showing the newest 
FALL STYLES 

Short Vamp Shoes 

Cuban A French Heels 



fe 



Novelties In 
CRAVENETTE 

High Button and 
Lace Shoes 



All Sizes. 



Fair Prices 



J. GLASSBERG 

2 VrORF** 58 3d Av i H - Y - nr - 10th st - 

*- 3IUHIj3 225 W. 4 2d St., w. of B'wsy 
Illustrated Catalogue J Free 



I 



CINCINNATI 

By HARRT BBSS. 

EMPRESS (George F. Fish, mgr.; S-C; 
rehearsal Sunday 10).— The Bimbos, opened; 
The Quaker Maids, hit; DeNoyer & Danle, 
fine ; The Morarts, novelty ; John Neff, good ; 
"Circumstantial Evidence," featured. 

KEITH'S (J. J. Murdock. mgr.; agent, V. 
B. O. ; rehearsal Sunday 10).— Louise Stlck- 
ney's Little Circus, opened ; Dooley & Sayles, 
good; The Six Klrksmlth Sisters, hit; Three 
Keatons. knockout ; Belle Story, hit ; Bert 
Leslie ft Co., the real feature act; Mile. Mlnnl 
Amato in "The Apple of Paris," featured. 

LYCEUM (Harrv Hart, mgr.; agent. Gus 
Sun).— Mcllyar & Hamilton. Jennie De Weese. 
Glbney ft Earle, Thompson & Carter, The 
Booth Trio, The Waynes, Del Reno. Elsie 
Garnella ft Co., George Searcy, The Girl from 
Shanleys. 

AUDITORIUM (R. J. Gomes, agent).— Cas- 
tallat ft Hall, Joseph M. Gnlden, Whlttlne; ft 
Gerard, Lester ft Howard, Morris Jones, Win- 
ton & Moore. 

PEOPLE'S (J. E, Fennessy. mgr.).— "Gay 
Widows Company," John C. Hart, comedian, 
carries off the honors with his droll "dope- 
fiend" turn. James Dailey and Joe Taylor 
are good. 

STANDARD (R. K. Hynlcka, mgr.; George 
Toby, house agent).— "Harry Hastlng's Big 
Show." "The Girl of Many Husbands" is a 
clever skit containing plenty of action. Tom 
Coyne, Ed. Edwards and Sam Sldman are the 
comedians. 

WALNUT (W. W. Jackson, mgr. ; S. A H.).— 
"A Kentucky Romance." Beulah Poynter plays 
In charming manner. 

LYRIC (James E. Fennessy. mgr.; Sbu- 
berts).— The Aborn Grand Opera Co. In reper- 
toire. Big business. 

GRAND O. H. (John H. Havlln, mgr.; T. 
Aylward. representative; K. ft E.)— Fritzi 
Scheff In "The Love Wager" is a big hit. 
Hazel Cox. scored as Katinka. The Wednes- 
day matinee has been abandoned. Capacity 
business. 

Si Hassen Ben All is in the city looking 
over his acrobatic act, which Is Bhortly to 
appear at Music Hall. 

Gus Frohman Joined the "Paseersby." 

Chic Lelser will on next Monday start a 
cabaret show in his restaurant. 



The Hotel Metrnpole upon Its completion 
will Install an orchestra and a cabaret show 
running about $750 weeklyn. 

THAT VAUDEVILLE AUTHOR 

Louis Chevalier 

SKETCHES. MONOLOGUES, LYRICS. 
PARODIES, written to order and staged. I 
have many succcskch to my credit. Let me 
write one for you. 

Office, BOS Gaiety Theatre Building, New 
York City. 




BALTIMORE 

By ARTHUR L. ROBB. 

MARYLAND (F. C. Schanberger. mgr.; 
agent, U. B. O. Rehearsal. Monday, 10.).— 
Joseph's Hart's "An Opening Night." by Ho- 
bart as the headline attraction opened to 
good house. Baby Helen, hit ; Walter S. 
Dlckerson, amused ; The Berrens, liked ; Chas. 
ft Fannie Van, good ; Harvey. Devara Trio, 
good impression. 

NEW THEATRE (George Schneider, mgr., 
direct.). — A poor show opened to big bouses 
Monday. Damela, with two escapement tricks, 
essayed headline honors, with fair results. 
Musical Yorke, pleased ; Nelusca and Lavina, 
fair ; Hlckey and Nelson, some laughs ; S. 
Dean ft Co.. amused. 

VICTORIA (C. E. Lewis, mgr. ; agent, Nixon- 
N'lrdllnger. Rehearsal, Monday, 10.).— Helen 
Page ft Co., enjoyed ; Grotesque Randolphs 
very good ; Four Lesters, pleased ; Mascagno, 
entertaining ; Clark ft Lewis, laughs ; Three 
Troubadours, liked. 

FORD'S (Charles E. Ford, mgr.; K. ft E.).— 
William Hodge In "The Man From Home" 
charmed large audiences. 

AUDITORIUM (Robert McBrlde. mgr. ; Shu- 
bert.).— Robert Mantell In Shakespeare reper- 
toire. Fair house Monday. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC (Tunis F. Dean, mgr.. 
'K. & E.).— "The Spring Maid." with Chris- 
tie McDonald, played to a large audience 
Monday night. 

HOLLIDAY STREET (William Rife, mgr. ; 
S. ft H.).— "The James Boys In Missouri" 
pleased a big house. 

OAYETY (William Ballauf. mgr).— "Taxi 
Girls" opened to two Immense houses Mon- 
day. Show, company and production enjoyed 
throughout. 

EMPIRE (George W. Rife, mgr.). -"Whirl 
of Mirth" kept a big house Monday night 
applauding and laughing. 

Samuel F. Nixon, president of The Nixon 

6 Zimmerman Co., lessees of the Academy, 
came to town Monday morning to be pres- 
ent at the opening of the fall dramatic sea- 
son at that theatre. 

Eugene Kernan. manager of the Lyceum 
theatre, Washington and brother of James 
L. Kernan, the well-kuown local theatrical 
magnate, was buried in this city, October 
7. The Eagles and Elks took charge of the 
funeral. Out of respect to Mr. Kernan, the 
show at the Empire theatre was halted five 
minutes while the funeral cortege passed the 
door. 

Andreas Dlppel, general manager of The 
Chicago Grand Opera Co. announces six per- 
formances of grand opera by this organi- 
zation at the Lyric, Nov. 1.8, 15. 22, Feb. 

7 and 14. The repertoire has not been def- 
initely decided upon, but the season will 
probably open with Mary Garden In Tosca. 



William Whitehurst. one of the stockhold- 
ers of the New theatre, a successful 9mall 
time vaudeville house of this city, has pur- 
chased the Pastime, a motion picture the- 
atre In the northeastern section of the city. 
It is Mr. Whltehurst's intention to Install 
vaudeville. 

AUSTRALIA 

11 Park Street, Sydney, Sept. 6. 
No material changes In the legitimate houses 
within the past fortnight, nor Is there any- 
thing startling In the vaudeville line, If we 
except the Five Olracs, who are making a 
big hit at the National with one of the fun- 



ORIGINAL 



Vaudeville Material 

Sketches, Monologues, Songs, etc., written 
to order and staged. .Reasonable terms 

ED. HANSEN 

1402 Broadway (Room 228). .Hours 10-1 
and by appointment. 



SCENERY »'"&"* 

Tilt-: A IKK. ttiNt St. and 3d Ave., New York. 

Productions. Vaudeville Acts and Aniline 

Dye Scenery* 

Lad of good appearance seeks situation in 
vaudeville ;ut. Good knowlerlKe of KchottlHrhc 
and h.ml shoe danclnR. good voice. Write. 
NEILSON, .are Orpheum Circuit, Putnam 
Building, New York. 

WANTED 

VELVET DROP— GOOD CONDITION. De- 
scribe color, nlze and price. Addrens L. O. \\ ., 
6 N. Clark, Chicago, care Paul ttoudron. 



THE PIONEER COMEDY 

WRITER OF AMERICA 

ALL ACTS GUARANTEED 

HIGHEST AWARDS ABROAD 



AL MACK 



58 East 128th St., New Ytrk 



SKETCHES, MONOI.OC.I r;s 
HONGS. PARODIKH, ETC. 
ALL CHARACTERS, FOR 
Al PERFORM KKS ONLY 



FRANK HAYDEN 

THEATRICAL COSTUMER 
148 W. 38th ST.. NEW YORK 

Tel. 1SS1 Greeley. 
Stage and Evening Gowns on hand. 

Mme. MENZELI 

Former Premiere Danseuse and Mattressr d* 

Ballst 
HIGH SCHOOL of Dancing and Pantomime, 
22 East 16th Street, bet. B'way and Sth Ave. 
Classic Ballet and All Styles of Dancing Acta 
created and staged 
Normal School of Dancing 
Pupils: Mile. Dasle, Hoffman, Froelich, Mar- 
low and other prominent stars. 
Send for Booklet. 



^NN.GERSTNEft Co 

fci4 Eighth Ave NtwYow.'. 41- ' i 

WE HAVE THE LARGEST STOCK Or 

THEATRICAL STAGE HARDWARE 

AND TOOLS IN THIS CITY 



PROFESSIONALS NOTICE 
Send me 40 cents In stamps and I will mall 
you at once 100 first class business cards. 
NEIGER, The Printer, 76 West Madison St.. 

Chicago. 

^ Theatrical Lawyer 

EDWARD J. ADER 

S No. CLARK STREET, CHICAGO 

Practice In all Stats and U. 8. Courts. 

Call ADVICE FREE Writs 




Clever Boy who can do Black 
Face Comedy and is a good 

dancer to join standard Vaude- 
ville act, must be 16 years old 

and not over 4% feet high. 

Address Bert Harvey 
care V , New York City 

SKETCHES 

Will take orders for a limited number of 
sketches, one to five people for $26.00. 610.00 
to accompany order, remainder on receipt of 
M8S. In ordering tell me exactly what you 
want and I will mall sketch to you within 
ton days. One sketch on hand for sals or 
lease — "Diana of the Tower," two men, one 
woman. Synopsis sent on request. Sketches 
oy me now headlining: "Stage Struck," and 
"The Doable Cross." 

FORREST W. TEBBETT8, Author and 
Producer, 667 Third Avs., Detroit. Mich. 

Wanted at once boy. hard shoe dancer able 
to fling, for drat clues act; long; engagement. 
Full particulars. Wrlto NEILMON, care Or- 
phcum Circuit, Putnam Building, New York. 



-1 



MONEY 

For You In Selling 

Drinking Cups 

In Your Theatre 

Install our /TicU//i/Cufid 
penny - in - the - slot 
machine. Please your 
patrons and gather in 
their pennies. Will pay 
you to put in water for 
this purpose. Do what 
other progressive 
houses are doing. 

Send for 

Special 

October 

Offer 



Individval Drinking (vp (ompany 




New York City: 
224 W. 19th St. 



Chicago .- 
904 Mich. Avr 



When ansxevrinp advertisements kindh/ mention VARIETY. 



34 



VARIETY 



TWO TREMENDOUS SHAPIRO HITS 






SOUTHERN MARCH-RAG SONG 



By BALLARD MAC DONALD and CARROLL and FIELDS 
We stake our reputation on this song being one of the greatest song hits we have published in IS years 



B^B^BJ 



SEEM" 



WONDERFUL SEMI-BALLAD 



By COOPER and OPPENHEIM 

Tnc most successful sons; of its kind on the market this year just off the press. 



SHAPIRO 






MIIQIT PUD Pfl i-LousftEKYSTEiNA Broadwa> and *>9th St. 

IflUUlU I UD. WW. V Managing Director ) NcwYork 



nieet acrobatic acts ever Been here, and that's 
Haying something. 

The Ttvoli has Chinko, Minnie Kauffman, 
Schenk Bros., Fred. Bluett, Rich and Rich, 
and usual holdovers. 



Martyn and Florence, an Australian juggling 
act, leave for the States Sept. 21. They will 
play Honolulu en route. 



National program not too strong this week, 
though the Olracs are worth the admission 
money. On the bill are Victoria Cross, Harry 
Sadler, Lucy Lavlnla, Three Reneauz, and 
Mable and Malfe. 



The big event of the week la the taking over 
of the Rlckards Circuit by Hugh D. Mcin- 
tosh, the world-renowned boxing promoter. 
Some months ago I mentioned Mcintosh as a 
prospective buyer, but he subsequently ap- 
peared to be out of the running. In a lengthy 
interview, Mcintosh showed that he Is likely 
to revolutlonlte the whole business here. 
There will be no fancy salaries paid to pen- 
sioners of the late Harry Rlckards, Instead 
the new entrepreneur will pay money to the 
right people. He said It made his heart bleed 
to see the pay-sheet containing figures of some 
acts that would have been amply repaid were 
their salaries forthcoming in shillings Instead 
of pounds — and he Is probably correct. 

The Actors' Union Is holding a matinee this 
month. Antagonism Is being met with from 
the Australian Vaudeville Association as well 
as from the kindred bodies, the latter stating 
that any funds coming from the performance 
will be utilized in fighting a rival society. 
At a special meeting of stage employees, held 
to-day, the previous decision was annulled 
owing to an amicable understanding between 
both parties. 



Max Steinberg and J. B. Morgan, of the J. 
1). Williams people, will eaplolt the Qreat 
McEwcn, a mesmerist of some standing. 



Jules Garrison had an experience In Western 
Australia last week. In one of his Imper- 
sonations the words "Dirty Dago" are in the 
script. This aroused the ire of the Fremantle 
fishermen, who thereupon held a mass meet- 
ing and marched to the hall In a body as a 
token of their feelings. All trouble was 
avoided by the elimination. 

•'Get-Rich-Quick Walllngford" Is creating 
quite a stir here. Many there were who failed 
to see how an American production, so full of 
expressions could ever hope for recognition 
here. The answer is capacity since Its opening 
five weeks ago. 



ALTOONA, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Wilmer A Vincent, mgra. ; U. 
B. O. ; rehearsal Monday 10). — Edgar Berger. 
good; Barry ft Mildred, nicely; Carson & 
Wlllard. laughs; The Lawn Party, liked. 

E. G. B 



John T. Ray & Co., fine; Sing Fong Lee. 
pleased; Bonesetta Troupe, sensational; 8-6. 
Fielding A Carlos, wonderful; Carter A Blu- 
ford, good; Miskel-Hunt-Miller, fair; Jack 
Banley, funny; Fredrick Ireland A Caalno 
Girls, pleased; 6. Fred Cole A Bull Dogs, 
good; Demarest A Doll, laugh; Crouch-Rich- 
ards & Co., pleased; Nester A Dahlberg, hit; 
Sherman & De Forest Co., big; capacity busi- 
ness. HEIMAN. 



ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

MAJESTIC (Arthur Lane, mgr. ; W. V. M. 
A.; rehearsal Monday at 2). — 7-9, DeLong 
Trio, good; Leo FUIler, many laughs; Harry 
Beresford A Co., hit; Foster Ball A Ford 
West, scream; Hill, Cherry A Hill, great. 10- 
12, Fielding A Carlos; Carter A Blueford; Mr. 
A Mrs. Allison; Mr. Bud Williamson; Lorna 
Jackson and her "Singing Boys." 

MELTON. 



BUFFALO. 

STAR (P. C. Cornell, mgr.; K. A E.). — Oct. 
7-9. Hyams A Mclntyre In "The Girl of My 
Dreams"; many encores; 10-12, W. H. Crane. 
In "The Senator Keeps House." 

TECK (John R. O'Shea, mgr.; Shuberts) — 
"C. O. D.," disappointing. 

SHEA'S (Henry J. Carr, mgr.; U. B. O. ; re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — The Seelbacks. ap- 
plause; Corelll A Gillette, went well; Belden, 
May A Co., laughter; Don, The Talking Dog. 



AKE 

NEVER GETS HARD- 



ATLANTA, OA. 

GRAND (H. L. Cordoza. mgr.). — 30-.. Mau- 
rice Freeman ft Co., good; Sadie Jansel, fair; 
Phil Statts. splendid; Gllden ft Hughes, hit; 
Alvln ft Kenny, good; The Opening Night, 
big hit; pictures. 

LYRIC (H. L. Cordoza and H. L. DeGlvr. 
mgrs.). — "The Little Tenderfoot." good busi- 
ness. 

THE ATLANTA (Homer George, mgr). — 
30-2, "The Rose Maid." played big business; 
3-5, "Alma, Where Do You Live?" big houses. 

BIJOU (H. L. DeGlve, mgr. ).— Vaudeville 
and pictures; good show and business. 

JOYCE 



BATTLE CREEK. MICH. 

BIJOU (Will Marshall, mgr.)— 29, Dixon & 
Dixon, good; College City Quartet, delightful; 



unusual; Puss in Boots, headllner; Tlghe & 
Clifford, scored; The Alpha Troupe, well re- 
ceived. 

ACADEMY (Henry M. Marcus, mgr.; Loew ; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Valals Bros., above 
average; Kitty Faye, encored; Pearl Trio, 
popular; Vaughn ft Glynn, approval; Terry & 
Schultz, held Interest; De Vole, startling; 
Billy ft Betty Arnold, classy; Power's Ele- 
phants, feature; Wm. Smith, won favor; Im- 
perial Trio, novelty. 

FAMILY (A. R. Sherry, mgr.; Loew; re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — Jack Anderson, neat; 
Bessie Smith, fair; Wm. S. Gill, tense; Ru- 
dolpho. ordinary; Moran ft Moran, pleased; 
Three Bennett Sisters, clever. THAYER. 



A.'. — La Bella Carmen; Bush ft Shapiro, 
Carl; Walter Law; Four Cates; Larklns * 
Pearl; Dunbar A Turner; Three O'Berlta Sis- 
ters. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Ralph Holmes, 
mgr.). — 6, "Ready Money"; 8. "Modern Eve'; 
12, "Rosary"; 16, "Blue Mouse"; 18, "Officer 
666"; 26-26, Howe's Pictures; 29, Honey Boy 
Evans; 31, "Common Law." 



CAMDEN, N. J. 

BROADWAY (W. B. McCallum, mgr. ).— 3-6, 
Dudley McKomus, fair; O'Brien ft Lear, 
pleased; Mayne Holmes Co., entertained; Gold- 
rlck ft Moore, liked; 7-9, Mamie Fleming, 
headllner; Jerry McAullff, hit; DeMlchell 
Bros., got over; Bobby Pandor, clever; Van 
Dyck Girls, applause. 

TEMPLE (Fred W. Falkner. mgr. ). — "The 
Wolf," to capacity. 

DANIEL P. McCONNELL. 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

HIPPODROME (H. A. Daniels, mgr.; U 
B. O. ; rehearsal Monday 10). — Blanche Walsh 
ft Co., "The Countess Nadlne," headlined the 
well-balanced bill; Alvln A Kenny, clever; 
Ethel McDonough, good musical numbers; . 
Graham Moffat's Co., Scottish sketch, inter-; 
estlng; Williams, Thompson & Copeland, 
laughable; Harry B. Lester, clever enter- 
tainer; Keller Mack ft Frank Orth. hit; Five 
Mowatts, extraordinary club Juggling. 

PRISCILLA (Proctor E. Seas, mgr.; Ous 
Sun; rehearsal Monday 10). — Sun's Minstrel's 
featuring Tom Powell ft Jlmmle Wall, head- 
line; Woods, Ralton ft Co., "The Musical Ma- 
rines"; The Singing Five; Woods, Kilduff ft 
Allerton Sisters; June Roberts A Co., "The 
Doll Makers' Dream"; Hanlon ft Clifton. 

OPERA HOUSE (Geo. Gardner, mgr; K. ft 
E.).— "The Enchantress," with Kitty Gordon, 
prima donna. 

COLONIAL (R. H. McLaughlin, mgr.; Shu- 
bert).— "The Ne'er-Do-Well." 

PR08PECT (Geo. Todd, mgr.; Stair, re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — Eleanor Montell, local 
favorite, in "A Woman's Name," doing good 
business. 

8TAR (Drew ft Campbell, mgrs.; rehearsal 
Monday 10). — The Big Review, with Frankle 
Heath and Harry Levan. 

EMPIRE (E. A. McArdel. mgr.; rehearsal 
Monday 10). — Ben Welch and his Burlesquers. 

WALTER D. HOLCOMB. 



BURLINGTON, IA. 

GARRICK (John M. Root, mgr., W. V. M. 



DAVENPORT, IA. 

AMERICAN (Chas. E. Berkell, mgr.: J. C. 
Matthews; rehearsal Monday 12.30). — Week 
30, Wm. Trainor ft Co., headline, fair; McCon-. 



MIC, 



KLI 



ND DAINTY 





IM 



The Little English Beauty, Presenting All Her Own and Original Songs 
EKK (Oct. 14), KEITH'S, BRONX, NEW 



F*K 



When answering advertisements kindly mention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



35 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT 



US1 



piaee to stop as la 
New York CI*. 
Om bleak from the Book- 
lag OfflMf, VARIETT and 
ths Pet Casey Ageaey. 



ft 



THE ST. KILDA 



•J 



Horn* far 

Professionals. 

Handsomely Furnished 

Steam Heated Rooms, 

Baths and •▼•17 

convenience. 



Now at 67 W. 44th Street 



PAULINE COOKE and JENIE JACOBS, Proprietors 



nell Sisters, much applause; Cowboy Quartet, 
voices please; comedy rough; Manny A Rob- 
erts, appreciated; Al Donnely, fair! business 

BURTIS (M. 8. Scovllle, local mgr.). — 
to "Girl from Rectors,' '15-BOc. ; 2-4, "Bunty 
Pulls the Strings." to capacity; 6,. "Fortune 
Huate": 7, "Divorce"; 10. "Putting It Over." 

GRAND (David L. Hughes)— Ralney pic- 
tures. 80. fair. SHARON. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

TEMPLE (a O. Williams, mgr.; U. B. O.; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Olga Petrova, head- 
liner; Phil Staats, hit; Kara, good; Raymond 
a Heath, very good; Devore Trio, pleased; 
yields A Lewis, laughs; Scott A Keane, re- 
freshing; Hursley Troupe, good. 

MILES (C. W. Porter, mgr.; T. B. C. ; re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — Rutan's Song Birds, 
hit; Rob Albright, well received; Klein. Ott A 
Nicholson, good; Richards £ Montrose, good; 
Diss's Monkeys, pleased; Elsie Murphy, 
pleased. 

FAMILY (C. H. Preston, mgr.; U. B. O.). — 
Dsvltt A Duval, laughs; Sandros Bros., ex- 
cellent; Harry Botter A Co.. very good; Wat- 
ton A Little, very good; E. J. Barsden, 
•cream; Doane, Lindsey A Doane, good; Col- 
lins A Hubart. good; Martin A Powell, good; 
Dracula, pleased; Thornton A Thornton, good; 
Musical Brahams, fair; George C. Moore. 

■leased. _ , v 

NATIONAL (C. R. Hagedorn, mgr.; Doyle). 
—Jessie Keller A Co., feature; DeRossle Duo, 

Kased; Campus Four, good; Five Juggling 
rdons. very good; Meade Girls, fair; Hattle 
Mcintosh A Picks, good; Roy A Blair, good; 
frank Goldle, fair. 

COLUMBIA (M. W. Schoenherr, mgr.; Gus 
lun).— Ollie Wood, pleased; "The Feud." 
food; McGarry A Revere, hit; Wormwood's 
Animals, good; B. Laurence, fair; Cliff Dean 
• Co., very good; Australia Trio, fine; Fern, 
Kern A Blgelow, very good. 

OATETY (William Roche, mgr.). — "Troca- 
dero Burlesquers." 

AVENUE (Frank Drew, mgr.).— "Bohemian 
Burlesquers." 

DETROIT (Harry Parent, mgr). — "Over 
the River" (Eddie Foy). 

GARRICK (Richard H. Lawrence, mgr.). 
—"The Typhoon" (Walker Whiteside). 

LYCEUM (A. R. Warner, mgr.). — "A Lucky 
Hoodoo" (Billy Van). 

Marvin Nies. formerly of the Miles Theatre, 
Is now advertising manager for the New 
Qayety. 

J. M. Ward announces that his new Colise- 
um, seating S.000, will be booked through the 
Sullivah-Consldlne circuit. 



The Folly opens with stock burlesque Oct. 
14. JACOB SMITH. 



ERIE, PA. 

COLONIAL (A. P. Weschler. mgr.; A. V. 
O'Brien, asst. mgr.; Gus Sun A U. B. O. ; re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — Hayden Troupe, good; 
Brltt Wood, big; Bessie Remple A Co. good; 
Howard A Laurence, big; Una Clayton A Co,, 
feature; Four Brass Men, clever. 

MAJE8TIC (J. L. Gllson. mgr.).— 7 "The 
Woman" 10, Hyams A Mclntyre. "The Girl 
Of My Dreams " M. H. MIZENER. 




Heart 

of 

Times 

Square 



Fitzgerald Building S. E. Corner 
Broadway and 43d Street 

Single Offices, Suites or Entire Floors 

Adjoining Cohan's Theatre 

For Theatrical Offices or 
Theatrical Supply Shops 
it is not only the best 
location in New York, but 
the best location in the 
world. 

Your own broker or 

Simon Lederer, Agent, on Premises 

Phone 5196 Bryant 



LEONARD HICKS 



A Real Proprietor of a 
Real Place to Live 



GEO. f. ROBERTS. Asst. Manatfer 

Cor. KatfisM i«d 

CHICAGO 



aSM HOTEL GRANT 



WHEN PLAYING BOSTON 




FURNISHED 
SUITES 

Completely furnish 
od, including dishes 
and linen, two and 
three large rooms, 
bath and kitchen- 
ette, phone, steam 
heat, elevator ser- 
vice. SlO-SlS per 
week ; accommo- 
dating four persons. 



313 HUNTINGTON AVE. 



In the 



•f the theatrical district 



KIRTLAND HOUSE 

62 SUMMER ST.. LYNN. MASS. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Osly sstsi is tat city bsrisi ream with private bars 



Dad's Theatrical Hotel 



PHILADELPHIA. 



ZEISSE'S HOTEL 

Opposite the Walnut and Casino Theatres. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



LOUIS 

REGENT HOTEL. 100 N. 14th 
NEW REGENT HOTEL, 101 N. 14th 

E. E. CAMPBELL. Prop, and Mfr., 

Walt* Rate* Headquarters 
Tea sniaa tos* walk so all theatres 

"A Theatrical Hotel of the Better Class" 

COOKE'S HOTEL 

Walnut Street, above Eighth. Philadelphia, 

opposite Caataa Theatre. 
Cafe Cabaret every alaflal. 

WALKER HOUSE "jj»° 

tO West Eagle Street 

BUFFALO. If Y. 

Nr. all theatre*. Bell Phoae Seneca 2844 W 



HOTEL VIRGINIA 

EUROPEAN 

THIRD and GAY STREETS COLUMBUS, OHIO 

RATES, $1.00 up; with bath, $1.50 up 

Special Rates and attention to professional people. Our restaurants are 
high grade at medium price. Club breakfasts, etc. We also operate 
NEW PARK HOTEL, Madison, Wis. 

F. R. McVEITY, Manager 



WAVERLY HOTEL 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Caters to the Theatrical Profession. Spagtal 
Rate. Centrally located la the heart aff the 
city. Private Baths. Cafe a la Carte. Free 
'bus meets ail trains. 

MRS. LUCK WILSON. Prep. 



"FULLER-GOLDEN" 

APARTMENTS 

Just completed with elegantly furnished 
two and three room suites. Reception 
room, amusement and billiard rooms, sun 
parlor, elevator, main line telephone In 
each apartment. 

715 Bizei street. Los Angeles 



FOR A GOOD HOME 

call to HOTEL TAXI 

Main Entrance 

408 Tremont Street; 21-83-25 Albion Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

Opposite Castle Square Theatre. 

Special Rates to Theatrical Profession. 

92 a week and up, single. f3 a week and 

up, double. Phone. Tremont 21680. 



FLORENZ HOUSE 

51 W. 86th St., near Herald So.. 
Rooms, 93 up. With board. $9 to 910 

per person. 
Good rooms, good location, and Mme. 

Florenz's own cooking. 
Phone, 2702 Greeley. 



Light's Restaurant 

et.. Jacksonville, Fla. 



94 



OUB MOTTO 

Cleanliness Prompt Service 

Moderate Prices Good Coffee 

Opposite Hotel Sesalaele. 

Theatrical patronage Invited. 



FALL RIVER. MASS. 

8AVOT (L. M. Boas, mgr.).— Oct. 7. "The 
Common Law." 

ACADEMT OF MUSIC (L. M. Boas, mgr.; 
Loew; rehearsal Monday 10). — 7-9. Bandy A 
Lewis, good; Al H. Wild, very good; The 
Oent and the Jimmy, good; Hardeen. a hit. 

BIJOU (L. H. Ooodhue, mgr.; Qulgley; re- 
hearsal Monday 10). — 7-9. J. Walker, good; 
Carroll A Elllns, good; Bill Stevens, very 
good; Edith Miller, very good: 10-12. Old 
Town Comedy Four; Arlington Slaters; Ball 
and Strike. EDW. F. RAFFERTY. 



pany "C"), strong performance; capacity 
house. 

PLAZA AIRDOME f Frank T, Hes««». mgr.; 
Bert Levey). — LaVelle A Finney; J. P. Tra- 
velle; Walter McMillan A Co.; LeRny A 
Cahlll; Dancing Stone; capacity business. 

EMPIRE (Frank L. Hesse, mgr; Bert Le- 
vey). — Opens 8d. 

TEALS (Frank Wolfe, mgr. ). — Elite Mu- 
sical Comedy Co. In "The Man from Klon- 
dike." Performance excellent; business nood 



It Is rumored that Ferris Harlman will 
bring his company from the fur East, to piny 
stock at Teals. J. F MOLL. 



HAMILTON, OHIO. 

SMITH'S (Tom A. Smith, mgr.).— 7-12. 
Halaphll Stock Co., dramatic stock; business 
good. 

ORAND (J. E. McCarthy, mgr.; Ous Sun; 
rehearsal Sunday, Tuesday A Thursday 10). — 
6-7. Leona A Adeline Slaters; Jacobs A Ber- 
tram; 8-9. Cortlse Trio; Madeline Burdett; 
10-12. Selbree A North; Smith A Vance; 
business good. 

JEWELL (J. H. Broomhall. mgr.).— 8-9. 
"The Blighted Son"; busim sh big. QUAD. 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Wllmer A Vincent, mgrs. ; U. 
B. O. ; rehearsal Monday 10). — Atlas Trio, 
pleased; Adler A Arllne. fair; Ed. Esmonds 
A Co., went well; Hayden, Dunbar A Hayden, 
applauded; Knute Erlcksnn, hit; Lasky's "Lit- 
tle Parislenne" (New Act), won Instant favor; 
good business. 

MAJESTIC (N. C. Myrick, local rep.; Rels 
Circuit). — Sept. 80-Oct. Z. "My Wife's Fam- 
ily," owing to poor business, stranded; 4-5. 
Howe's Travel Festival, packed houses; 7-8, 
Anthony Andre in "Faust"; 9. "Mutt A Jeff"; 
10, Harrington Reynolds In "The Angelus"; 12. 
AlejrCarr in "Louisiana Lou" 14, "Miss New 
York. Jr." (burlesque); 16, "The Concert." 

J. P. J. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

POLI'B (W. D. Ascough. mgr. U. B. O. 
rehearsal Monday at 10). — Sam Mann A Co.. 
fine; Donovan A McDonald, big; OUIe Young 
A April, entertaining; Wills A Burt, favorites; 
Kalmar A Brown, clever; Marie Fenton, liked; 
Bush Bros., good. 

HARTFORD (Fred P. Dean, mgr.; agent. 
James Clancy; rehearsal Monday and Thurs- 
day 11). — 7-9, Bruce Richardson A Co., good 
Ballo Bros., pleased: Manley A Carson, liked; 
Burns A Franklin, hit; Ellison, clever; 10-12. 
Seven Merry Makers; Murray A Lane Frank 
Howard; Kennedy A Kramer; Will Lacey. 

PAR80N8' (H. C. Parsons, mgr.) — 7-9. "The 
Pink Lady"; 10-11, "The Trail of the Lone- 
some Pine," return engagement. 



Anna Engle, last season with Lasky's "An- 
tique Olrl" company, has Joined Lasky's "Lit- 
tle Parisian" company, which opens at Har- 
rlsburg, Pa, Monday. R. W. OLMSTED. 



HAVERHILL, MASS. 

COLONIAL (L. B. Mayer, mgr. ; U. B. O. ). 
— 7-9. Frechette A Frlgone. fair; Colonial 
Players, with Dick Barry, well liked; Dave 
Rafael, applause; Dan Dawson, entertaining; 
Four Regals, good; 10-11, Moss A Frey; Jes- 
sie Hay ward: Blmberg, Marlon & Day. "Mutt 
A Jeff" 12. advance sale big. "CHIME." 



HOOPE8TON, ILL. 

McFERREN O. H. (Wm. McFerren, mgr. ; 
Ind.).— 9. "The Blue Mouse"; 10-12. The Cal- 
lahan Dramatic Co. 

VIRGINIAN (Max M Nathan, mgr.; W. V. 
M. A.). — 8-6. Mrs. Otto Flechtl A Co.. very 
good; 7-9, The Two Scotch Mscks; Hulme A 
Dempster. RIGG8. 



JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 

ORPHEUM.— Rosell's Minstrels, hit; Har- 
mony Kings; Waldo Bros.; University Four; 
Miss Bettle May; "A Glimpse of Dixie," good 
•how. 

DUVAL— "The Quaker Girl." played to 
good audience; Al. G. Field, played to good 
business 80-1. 



Montgomery's Grand and Savoy theatres are 
drawing, owing to the Introduction of vaude- 
ville acts. JOHN S. ERNEST. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

OAYETY (Bert McPhail, mgr.).— "Star A 
Garter," to packed houses. 

CENTURY (J. R. Donegan. mgr.).— "Follies 
of the Day," catchy. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Lehman, mgr.).— Paul- 
ine Moran; Mountain Ash Male Choir; Omeer 
8lsters A Co.; Cressy A Dayne (2d week); The 
Stanleys; Lester; Ronalr A Ward; strong, In- 
testing bill; every act went strong; big houses. 

EMPRESS (8. C. circuit).- The Three Gra- 
vida Bros.; Dellsk A Vernon; A Night In the 
Edelweiss; Veronl Verdi A Rro. ; White's Com- 
edy Circus: Hugo Lutgcns; a well-balanced 
bill. 

fJRAN'D. — CJi.«um-ey Okoit. 2d Wcp k ; nig 
houses. 

GARDEN THEATRE < E. IV Churchill, mgr 
Thentre Booking <*orp. ). — Cha*. files A f'o. ; 
Moratl Opera Co.; Werden A Gelrsen ; Helen 
IMngree A Co.; Frank Rogers; Edw. Win 
Chester; Whyf.-. Pllz.r A Whyte; Noble & 
nrookn; ILirry Mine*; 8 Kalchl Japs; H«-ndrix 
A R.lllxh I'.rry A Snyder. 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 

Kl -'ITU'S (.1. L. Weed, mgr.; IV R Oi. — l.i 
Toy Rros., clever; The Hess Sinters, please. I. 



■SAKE YOUR NECK AND ARMS 

SURATT'S FLESH WHITENER 



BEAUTIFUL 

FOR STAGE OR STREET 

Two Colors. Flesh and White 
A liquid face powder without an equal Easy to apply, does not rub off. [Mel quickly und 
smoothly. A new Oriental Cream with i fa* inating Oriental Peifume Large bottU ..r can $.50 
By mail $.60. 



FRESNO. CAL. 

BARTON OPERA HOUSE (Robert G. Bar 
ton, mgr). — "Bought and Paid For' (Corn- 



Retail Stores Broadway, Cor. 46th Street 
Eighth Ave. .Cor. 44th St. (Hotel Astor Bram h) 



F. K. JAMES COMPANY, Mannlaeturim Cstmistt 
247 West 48th St., New York 



When anticerinrt <i<fr>-rriV?nr'if* kindly mention VARIETY. 



36 



VARIETY 



FISHER 



AND 



MORT 

SHARP 



NOV 



SINGING 



Consisting of all Mr. Fisher's own compositions. Closing their act with Mr. Fisher's 

sensational song hit "WHEN I GET YOU ALONE TO-NIGHT" 



Windsor Trio, very food; Joe Jackson, clever; 
Havlland A Thornton, good; Taylor Granville's 
"Hold Up." excellent; stave setting, very 
good; acting, In words, fine; Van Hoven, good; 
pi ct urea 

McCAULEY'S (John T. McCauley, ragr. ; 
K. A E.).--7-9, Nazlmova, 8. R. O., in "The 
Marionettes." 

MASONIC (J. J. Oarrlty, mgr.; Shuberts). — 
7-9, "Within the Law"; 10-12, "The Girl from 
Toklo." 

BUCKINGHAM (Horace McCracklln. mgr). 
— "Yankee Doodle Girls Co.," fair crowd. 



No announcement has been made about tak- 
ing the Eastern wheel out of Louisville. Ky. 

J. M. OPPENHEIMER. 



LOWELL, MASS. 

KEITH'S (Wm. Stevens, mgr.; U. B. O. ; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Geo. R. Wlchman, 
good; The Lester Trio, very good; Boyce * 
Blaile. clever; Cal. Dean A Lela Price, funny; 
Wm. Cahlll, hit; Mlddleton ft Spellmyre, very 
good; Armstrong A Ford, fine; Delmore A 
Oneida, good. 

MERRIMACK SQUARE (Jaa. 8. Carroll, 
mgr.; John 8. Qulgley; rehearsal Monday 10). 
— The Temple Players; Grace Hawthorne; Ro- 
malne; Dean A Goodwin; Flood A Erma. 

OPERA HOU8E (Julius Cahn, prop. A 
mgr.)— 8-9. "Mutt A Jeff." 

HATHAWAY'S (Gartland A Shapiro, lea- 
sees). — Stock. 



MACON, GA. 

GRAND (Jake Wells, mgr.; U. B. O).— SO. 
Jerge A Hamilton, hit; Dick Thompson A Co., 
fine; Larrle Clifford, great; Cavanna Duo, 
splendid; Aldro A Mitchell, clever; Moore A 
St. Clair, good; Goodrich, Van A Hill, fair; 
Valerie Bergere Players, fine. 

I'ALACE (J. B. Melton, mgr.). — Duncan A 
Holt: picture*. 

MAJESTIC (J. B. Melton, mgr.).— Majestic 
Quartet, good; pictures. 

Rlngllng Brothers' circus. 8th. 

ANDREW ORR. 

MARION, ILL. 

NEW ROLAND (E. E. Clark, mgr.). —"Fun 
on the Podunk Limited." pleased capacity 
house; 8. HI A Trlz, In "A Pair of Country 
Kids," splendid, to good house. 

J. M. JENKINS. 



MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, managing dtr. ; 
direct). — The Three Ravens, fair; H. George 
Slmondet. well received; Watson's Farmyard 
Circus, good; Godfrey A Henderson, fair; 
Mme. Bertha Kallsh, excellent; Kaufman 
Bros., hit; Bottomley Troupe, good. 

UNIQUE (Jack Elliot, mgr.; 8. A C).— 
I>lnd; Three Lorettas; Gaylord A Herron; 
Milt Arnsman; Seven Plchlannas. 

MILES (Wm. Oallager. mgr.; Walter Keefe) 
— May Ward: Edouard Jose; Canines de 
Luxe; Josh Dale; Norlne Carman. 

SHUBERT ("Buzz" Bainbridge. mgr.; Shu- 
bert). — "The Bird of Paradise"; business good. 

METROPOLITAN (L. N. Scott, mgr.; K. 
& E.). 

GATETY (Wm. Koenlg. mgr.).— Miner's 
Americans. 

IlIJOU (Theodore Hayes, mgr.; Weber Cir- 
cuit).— "Tlllle's Nightmare." 



MOBILE, ALA. 

MOBILE (J. Tannenbaum. mgr.; K A E. ). 

5. "The Rose Maid": 7. "The Rosary." 

LYRIC (H. C. Fourton. mgr.; U. B. O.) — 
Musical Vinos, well received: Roy A Wilson, 
pleasing; Clarence Sisters & Brother, well 
liked; PI<>roe ft Roslyn, appreciated; Keno. 
Welsh & MelroBe. heavy applause. 

KETSERHOFF (formerly Harney: P. H. 
Hamel, mgr.): Orpheum Musical Comedy 
Co. (R. Hobard, mgr). 

DREAMLAND (W. Cyril Poolcy. mgr.: 
Hnrlklns). — Forrest G. Wyro & Co. Stock. 

B. J. WILLIAMS 



MONTREAL. 

HIS MAJESTY'S (H. Q. Brooks, mgr.; K 
,V- E.).— George Arllss In "Disraeli"; 14. Mrs 
Klske In "The High Road." 

PRINCESS (H. C. Judge, mgr.; Shuberts t 

7. Nordlca; 8-12. "Bunty Pulls the Strings'; 
I i. "Everywoman." 

ORPHEUM (G. F. Drlscoll. mgr.; V. B. <> • 
Spirit Paintings": Eva Taylor; Perry \- 
White; Brown. Harris & Brown; Wlllanl 
HutchlMMi * Co.; Arco Bros; P»t t .Tones 
WYnMwiith Vests ft Teddy. 



THIS WEEK (Oct. 7) GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



BILLY 



SWEDE" 



HALL 



with JENNIE COLBORN and CO. 

Next Week (Oct. 14) Poll's, Springfield, Mass. 
Oct. 21— Poli's, New Haven 

Booked Solid 

Direction LOUIS WESLEY 





1 



The Joyful comedian and sons; writer. 
Touring the Snlllvan-Consldine Circuit. 
Author of "Good Night Mr. Moon/' "Pucker Up Your Lips Miss Llndy." "Hear 
Chimes," "Come with Me to Honey Moon Land," etc. 




IF YOU WANT A 

IM 

USE 



The Towels 

(Colored) 

Comedy, Singing, Dancing and Talking 
"THE MAN WITH THE BIG VOICE" 

Address Care VARIETY, New York 



JACK SYMONDS 



"THE MAN OF- E 

Still meeting with success 
Never Idle 'Cause EDDIE S&VI AL 

Putnam Building, New York 



9 » 



keeps Me Busy 



FRANC AI8 (J. O. Hooley. mgr.; Loew).— 
Harold McAullffe; Corlnne Coffey; Cooper A 
Rlcardo; Colonial Seven; Montrose Troupe; 
Troupe Francalse. SHANNON. 



MUNCIB, IND. 

STAR (Hoy Andrews, mgr.; Gus Sun; re- 
hearsal Monday 10.80). — Joe Kennedy, very 
clever; Ourl Troupe, big; The Brown Duo, 
classy; Gus Sun one-act musical comedy, 
scored. GEO. F1FER. 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 

BIJOU (George Hickman, ragr.). — Wck 
Sept. 30. "A Man's Game." good business, 
week 7, "East Lynne." 

ORPHEUM (George Hickman, mgr.; U. B. 
0. ; rehearsal Monday 10). — Musical Maidens, 
well received; Morrlsey Three, graceful; Rob- 
erts, Hays A Roberts, liked; "On the Road," 
big headline; Uno Bradley, big hit; Boranl & 
Ncvaro, scored; opening performance to ca- 
pacity. 

PRINCESS <Hnrsy Sudekum ingr. , W. V. 



M. A.; rehearsal Monday 10). — Huntress, 
headline; I.oughlln's Dogs, well received; 
Latoy Brothers, splendid; Village Four, 
scored; V. E. Phelps, hit; business good. 

VENDOME fW. A. Sheets, mgr.; K. A K ). 
— 28-29. Field's Minstrels, capacity. 

W. R. ARNOLD 

NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.; U. B. 
O. ; rehearsal Monday 9.) — Stella Tracey, hit- 
Wlllard Slrams A Co., success; Major A Roy: 
Bedined A Arthured, good; Donahue A Stew- 
art, scored; Conly A Webb, entertained; Mon- 
tambo A Wells, fine; Brent Hayes, groot ban- 
.lolst; Mosher-Hayes A Mosher, round out good 
bill. 

LYRIC (Proctor's). — Maude Parker A Co 
In "The Wild Rose." capably enacted; Sadie 
Fondeller, good wlrlst; Anne Fenwlck; Palm- 
er-Lewis A Co.. amused; De Stefano Bros, 
play well; "Alias Mr. Roseberry," clevor 
sketch; Capt. Brunswick A Co.. In "Tho Ten- 
derfoot." pleased. 

WASHINGTON (O. R. Neu. uigi Fox i - 



8| 



Melbourne McDowell-Isabell Evesson A Co., irf 
"The Sheriff," capably handled; Baby Gladys 
danced nicely; Dynes A Dynes, good; Jenkins 
A Covert, amuse; Reynolds A Hall, jest; 
Rice, Elmer A Toms, acro-hlts; Jennie Bush, 
clever. 

ODEON (Charles Burtis, mgr.; U. B. O.).— 
"Boys and Girls of Avenue A" pleased; Clin- 
ton A Russell; The Flying Rogers; Ezier A 
Webb, entertained; Grace Anderson, In song; 
charmed; Carleas Briscoe, clever corned 
juggler. 

SHUBERT (Lee Ottelengul, mgr.).— "Over 
Night." large business. 

NEWARK (George Robbins, mgr.). — Chad 
lotte Walker A Co., In "The Trail of 
Lonesome Pine," good business. 

ORPHEUM (M. 8. Schleslnger, mgr.).— 
"The House Next Door," big business. 

JACOB8 (George Jacobs, mgr.). — N. T. C. 
to fair business. 

GAYBTT (Leon Evans, mgr.). — "Bowery 
Burlesquers." a good show doing well. 

MINER'S (Frank Abbott, mgr.).— "The/ 
Pace-Makers," setting the "pace" for business.' 

ARCADE (L. O. Mumford. mgr.). — Carter, 
De Haven A Green, musical hit; Flo .Tensn. 
quaint; Jack Dean, song writer, phased; 
"Clara Barton and Her Red Cross Girls." sang 
pleasantly; Carr A Trac. funmakers, amused;* 
The Travesty Co., In '<Bunky Tied Her 
Strings." a scream. JOE O'BRYAN. 



PATBBSON, N. J. 

MAJESTIC (W. H. Walsh, mgr.; U. B. 0.' 
rehearsal Monday A Thursday 11). — 7-9. Con- 
rad A Reld, good; Morris A Peasley, good/ 
LaFrance A McNabb, funny; Italia A Co... 
good; 10-12, Collette Trio; Morton A Lusso: 
Innes A Ryan; The Prentice Trio; capacity 
houses. 

ORPHEUM (Chas. F. Edwards, mgr.):— 7-9, 
"Stars of Stageland"; 10-12. "Oriental Bur- 
lesquers," big houses. 

EMPIRE ( Floyd Lauman. mgr). — 7-9. "Gus 
Fay A Gayety Girls"; 10-12, "The World of 
Pleasure." 

OPERA HOUSE (Zabrlskle A Reld. mgrs.). 
— Stock. 

LYCEUM (Chas. F. Wilbur, mgr.).— "Happy 
Hooligan." DAVID W. LEWIS. 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

GRAND (Harry Davis, mgr.; U. B. O.).— 
Valerie Bergere A Co.. magnificent; Bert Fltz- 
glbbon, hit; Mr. A Mrs. Hugh Emmet, very 
good; 81x American Dancers, excellent; LeS 
Gougets, pleased; Tuscano Bros., well re- 
ceived; Sherman. Van A Hyman. enloyable; 
Three Alex, very good; Adelaide Frances, 
clever. 

HARRIS (Harris A Davis, mgrs.; U. B. 
O.). — De Richards' Dogs, applause; Tojettl & 
Bennett, fine; Gibson Craig, capable; Lucier I 
Ellsworth, good; Aerial Belmonts. int. resting} 
Four Stagpooles, pleased; Five Musical At- 
torneys, very good; Three Entertaining Fel-' 
lows, good; Jack Qulgley, well received; Del- 
more Sisters, hit 

KENYON (Titus Kenyon, mgr.; rollock).-) 
Carrel Perlot A Co.; Heyn Bros.; Two Karlsei 
Hamilton A Earle; McNutts; Four Blondins! 
Talkers A Dsncers. 

FAMILY (John P. Harris, mgr.; U. B. O.), 
— Kortelle A Stoddard; Herbert A Lawrence; 
Alec Thomas; Slgnor Raglenne; Smith & Lar- 
son; Kleffer A Alberts; Great Atkinson; Maris; 
Gerard. 

ALVIN (John P. Reynolds, mgr.; Shubert). 
— "The Juno Bride"; week H, "N. ■'• r-De- 
Well." 

NIXON (Thos. R. Kirk, mgr.; K. & E )•— 
Henry Miller In "The Rainbow"; 14. "The 
Littlest Rebel." 

LYCEUM (C. R. Wilson, mgr.; S. & II.).— 
The Rosary"; 14, "Mutt A Jeff." 

DUQUE8NE (Harry Davis, mgr.).— Stock. 

GAYETY (Henry Kurtzmnn. mRr.).- 
Queens of Paris'; 14. "Social Maids." 

Robert Welgle Early, made his debut thic' 
week with the Harry Davis Stock Playi-rs. 

Evyleen Ramsey, of the Six American Dan- 
cers at the Grand this week, was tak>n sud- 
denly 111 with appendicitis Monday ami wa* 
operated on. 



The New Kenyon Opera House, whi -h i s 
being rapidly constructed, win be op- n of 
Thanksgiving day with "pop" vaudeville Will 
be booked by S. A C. SINCLAIR 



When anwcrifi'i <idvrrtinf*niont* kindli/ m- nfi'Vi VARIETY 



PORTLAND, ME. 

BORTLAND (I. P. Mosher, mgr. v. \ 
rt-hi'arsal Monday 10 30). — Chnrlfs I.- 



t n.. 

•nirsr, 



VARIETY 



37 



* 






JtY> ./jL XX. -/jL 

THE ACT OF QUALITY 
JUST ARRIVED PLAYING VAUDEVILLE 

- 

Representative, LOUIS WESLEY 

Gaiety Theatre Building, New York 



z 



very clever; Reeves & Werner, hit; Ye Old 
Home Cholre, excellent; Martin A Courtney, 
fine; Bimm, Bomm Brrr Trio, good. 

GREELEY'S (J. W. Greeley, mgr.; Ind. 
rehearsal Monday and Thursday 10.30). — 7-9. 
Farlardo, pleased; Carney. Buckley A Co- 
good; 10-12. Al Reed's Bull Terriers; Konney 
4 Hollis. ^ 

KEITH'S (James E. Moore, mgr.). — "Rose- 
mary." „.«... 

SCENIC (Westbrook) (Guy P. Woodman, 
ngr.; U. B. O. ; rehearsal Monday and Thurs- 
day d—7-9, Thomas A Ward, fine; 10-12, 
Hayes A Suites. H. C. A. 

NEW PORTLAND. — Blmm Bomm Brrr 
Trio; Ye Olde Home Choir; Martin A Court- 
ney In "At the Movies"; Charles Ledegar; 
Reves A Warner. 

QREELY'S. — 7-9, The Great Farlado; Car- 
ney-Buckley A Cook; 10-12, Al Reed's Bull 
Terriers; Kenney A Mollis. ^ ^ ^^ 



PROVIDENCE, B. I. 

BULLOCK'S (P. L. Burke, mgr.; U. B. O.). 
_3 C-olden Sisters, excellent: Shelley A Proc- 
tor good; That Comedy Four, fine; Nellie 
Clayton, good; Yorke Herbert Trio. fair. 

UNION (C. Allen, mgr.; Qulgley).— A 
Night on the Wharf." very good. The Scots 
and Soans A Co.. good; The Cole Troupe. 
pleased; Camp Rest, good; Mabel Plerson, en- 
cores. „ _, 

SCENIC (F. W. Homan, mgr.). — Homan Mu- 
sical Stock Co. ' v „ 

WESTMINSTER (G. Collwln. mgr.). — The 
Golden Crook Extravaganza Co. 

KEITH'S (C. Lovenberg. mgr.; U. B. O.). — 
Barcus & Gartelle; Laura Buckley; Frank 
Coombs A Ernest Aldwell: Homer B. Mason; 
MarRiierite Keeler A Co.. Wlnsor McCay; The 
Bendlx Ensemble Players; Mr. A Mrs. Jlmmle 
Barry The Four Provosts. 

COLONIAL (F. Burke, mgr.; K. A E.). — 
The Real Thing." with Henrietta Crosman. 

OPERA HOUSE (F. Wendelshafer. mgr.; 
Bhuberts). — "A Butterfly on the Wheel." 

C. E. HALE. 



READING, PA. 

ORPHEUM (Wilmer A Vincent, mgrs. ; U. 
B. O. rehearsal Monday and Thursday 10.S0). 
—Manning Twins, liked: Bartlett. Breton A 
Co., laughs; Lucky A Yost, good; Monarch 
Comedy Four, big; Sutton. Mclntyre A Sut- 
ton, very well. 

HIPPODROME (C. G. Keeney, mgr.; Pru- 
dential; rehearsal Monday and Thursday 
10.30). — Lewis A Rose, good; The Randalls. 
liked; Wally Fltxglbbons. good; Reed * Hil- 
ton, nicely; McAlevey Marvels, good; Clifford 
Hippie A Co., headline, very well. 

ACADEMY.— 14, "The Concert."; IB. "Pink 
Lady " G. R. H. 



ROANOKE, VA. 

ROANOKE (William P. Henrltze. mgr.; U. 
B. O. ; rehearsal Monday and Thursday 11). — 
7-9. The Five Bragdons. big; Lowe A Ster- 
ling, very good; Aldro A Mitchell, did well; 
Bessie Babb, applause; Trask A Gladden. 
good; 10-12. Herrera; Arthur Rlgby: Halley 
• Noble: Three Escadors; Nina Esphey. 

JEFFERSON. — Latlmore-Lelgh Players: 7- 
12. "Three Weeks." T. .F. B. 

ROCKLAND, ME. 

ROCKLAND (Al. V. Rosenberg, mgr.; U 
B. O. ; rehearsal Monday and Thursday 11). — 
1-5. Johnny Gelger, excellent; Llghtner A 
Jordon. excellent: good hill to big houses: 
7-9. Col. Sam Holdsworth, good; Hayes * 
Suites, good: 10-12. Dancing Wllletts: Weston 
& Keith: next Week; Taylor Stock Co. 

A. C. J 



SALT LAKE CITY. 

ORPHEUM. — 29. Charlie Case and W. C 
Fields divided honors. Immense hits: Mrs. 
Oene Hughes A Co., great: The Rexos. liked: 
Mildred Grover. pleased: "Squaring Accounts." 
applauded; Bradshaw Bros., liked; immense 



HARRY TATE'S <9. 

FISHING^MOTORING 



NEW YORK 
ENGLAND 
AUSTRALIA 
AFRICA 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Willa Holt Wakefield 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Special Representative: 
J EN IE JACOBS. 



WILFRED CLARKE 

Address Lambs Club, New York 



FRED, and ARELE ASTAIRE 

Now Touring on th' Orpheum Circuit in 

NED WAYBURN'S VAUDEVILLE SUCCESS 
"A RAINY SATURDAY." 



. 



business account of being State Fair Week. 
Irrigation Congress and Mormon Conference. 

EMPRESS.— 1, "A House Boat Party," big 
hit; The Leap Year Girls, well received; Lowe 
A Edwards, fair; Joe Cook, ordinary; Von 
Hampton A .Tosselyn, passed; Jack Allman, 
pleased, capacity. 

SALT LAKE. — 30. Hoi brook Bllnn in "A 
Romance of the Underworld"; great show, 
capacity business. 

COLONIAL. — 29, Mack-Rambeau players in 
"The Man From Home." good show; good 
business. 

GARRICK. — 30. Mrs. Annie Adams In "The 
Butler's Secret." ordinary. OWEN. 

SAVANNAH, OA. 

NEW SAVANNAH (William B. Seesklnd. 
mgr.; K. A E.). — "The Quaker Girl" delighted 
capacity house 4th; 5. "Mutt A Jeff." good 
houses; 8. "The Traveling Salesman: 9. Al. 
G. Field's Minstrels; 11, Maude Adams In 
Peter Pan"; 16, "Alma." 

LIBERTY (Tedd Brackett, lessee and mgr.) 
—80. "The Fortune Hunter." put on In a 
most admirable manner with an excellent 



company of players to good houses; this week. 
"Wildfire." 

BIJOU (Corbln Shields, mgr.; U. B. O. ; re- 
hearsal Monday 11). — Splendid bill to packed 
houses; The Heidelberg Four, tremendous hit; 
Cnvanna A Co., excellent: Jerge A Hamilton, 
great; Cunningham A Coveny, very good; 
Austin A Taps, pleased. REX. 



SCHENECTADY. N. ¥. 

PROCTOR'S (Chas. Gouldlng, mgr.; U. B. 
O. : K..A E. ; rehearsal Monday and Thursday 
10.30).— 2, "The Rose of Klldare"; Flske 
O'Hara with a fine cast and magnificent scen- 
ery scored a distinct hit: 3-5, Sophie Everett 
A Co.. fair; The Magnanl Family, good; Lee 
A Allen, liked; 8adle Fondeller. pleased. 
Palace Quartet, hit; pictures; fine business: 
7-9, Keene, laughs; RoBe A Montrose, very 
good; Coyle A Murrell, liked: Hlbbert A Ken- 
nedy, favor; Will Rhoem's Athletic Glrln, big 
hit; pictures; big business. 

ORPHEUM (F. X. Bregmaler, mgr.; Jo. 
Wood; rehearsal Monday and Thursday \2). — 
3-6, A. Lacrolx A Co., laughs; Erica Neske & 
Co.. fine; Duffy A Mae,, pleased; Kitty Fay. 
good; pictures; 7-9, The Hennlngs, pleased 



Gene A Arthur, scored; Duke Darling, liked; 
The Long Green Trio, excellent; pictures 
good business. 

MOHAWK (Ackertnan J. Gill, mgr.).— Dark. 

VAN CURLER (Chas. G. McDonald, mgr.; 
Shubert & Co-op.).— 3-6, "The Melting Pot"; 
7-9. Paul J. Rainey'a African hunt pictures. 

HOWARD A. ARANY. 



SIOUX CITY, IA. 

ORPHEUM (C. E. Wilder, res. mgr.; re- 
hearsal Sunday 10.30). — Lockhart A Le<l«iy. 
good; Lew Cooper, good; Florentine Singers, 
very good; Bob A May Kemp, fine Drums of 
Oude, excellent; Merrill A Otto, scored; Cas- 
selll's Dogs, good. DEAN. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. 

ORPHEUM (A. J. Allardt, mgr.; W. V. M. 
A.; rehearsal Monday and Thursday). — 7-9. 
Black A McCone; Velerle Sisters, fair; The 
Five Armanis, applause; Charles Glbbs. hit; 
Spellman's Bears, great; 10-13. Celest A Co.; 
Moore A Browning; Grady A Co.; Coogan A 
Parka; Don Carlo's Marionettes; business fair. 

AUDITORIUM (8. W. Pickering, mgr.).— 
7-13, Wright Huntington Co., fine business. 

OLIVER (S. W. Pickering, mgr.).— 14, "The 
Siren." WM. H. STEIN. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

COURT SQUARE (D. O. Gilmoru, mgr.. 
Ind.). — 7-9, "Trail of the Lonesome Pine." 
good company, poor houses; 10-12, "Passing 
of the Third Floor Back" (Ian Robertson); 
14-15, "A Rich Man's Son." 

GILMORE (P. F. Shea, mgr.).— "The Daz- 
slers," fair show. 

POLI'S (Gordon Wrlghter, mgr.; U. B. O. : 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Tempest A Ten, very 
good; Morton A Glass, hit; Hufford A Chain, 
good; Black A White, pleased; Selbinl A 
Grovlnl, good; Honores A Le Prince, fair; 
Clara Inge, went well. GEORGE PRESSL. 



ST. JOHN, N. B. 

OPERA HOUSE (D. H. McDonald, mgr). 
— 30-2, "The Fortune Hunter," business fair; 
4-5. Alice Lloyd In "Little Miss Fix-It." good 
business; 7-10, "The Arrival of Kitty." 

NICKEL (W. H. Goldlng, mgr.; U. B. O.).— 
Margaret Breck, I net Miller, Floyd Baxter; 
pictures. 

LYRIC (Steve Hurley, mgr.).— 30-2. Six 
Imperial Dancers; 3-6, Whlttaker A Hubbard; 
pictures. L. H. CORTRIGHT. 

SCNBl'RY, PA. 

CHESTNUT ST. OPERA HOUSE (Fred J. 
Hyrod. mgr.). — "Excuse Me," good house; 12. 
"The Girl In the Tasl." 

R. J. GOLDBERGER. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

liKANO (Chas. H. Plummer, mgr.; Keith's 
\audevllle; Chas. G. Anderson, mgr.). — Her- 
inlne Shone A Co.. pleased; Francis Yates, 
well liked; Harry Devlne A Belle Williams, 
many laughs; Julius Steger A Co., splendid: 
Hoey A L*;e, hit; Bullots, novelty gymnast*. 
good. 

EMPIRE (Martin L. Molf, mgr.; Frederic 
Gage, local mgr.). — 14. Trentlnl In "The Fire- 
fly* 

• BA8TABLE (8tephen Beatable, mgr.). — 14- 
16. Clark's "Runsway <l\r\W . 17-19. "Alma. 
Where Do You Live?" 



TERRE HAUTE. IND. 

VARIETIES (Jack Hoeffler. mgr.; W. V. 
M. A.; rchearnal Thursdny). — Schallfr 
A Jordan. fair; The Mullers, good; 
Valeria Sisters, good; West A Charles, hit. 
Gardner A Vincent, pleased; McCann & Co., 
hit: Fisher A Green, fair; Bell Canto Trio, 
go.td ; Five Armanis, good; Ballerlnl's Doks, 
well trained; K°'»d business. 

GRANT) (T. W. Barhydt. Jr.. mgr.).— <. 
Vaughn 'II.-is.t; 11. Nell O'Brien Minstrels. 

CHRIB. 



TOLEDO. O. 

KKITH'S.- Archie Onrl & Polly, aoo<l 
.M.irige I*. M.tltland. fair; Lloyd & Whltehous« 



THE BELLMONTES 



Jim Nastic's Classic 

Direction C. W. BOSTOCh 



When anatrri'ii't/ mlrertisryvri't* kinffli/ mrnt'Gn VAR/FTY 

t 



VARIETY 



In the number 3 position at the Majestic Chicago last week (Sept. 30) stopped the show 
Sunday night and was compelled to put the boys an the Revolving Table to do extra falls 

SOME RIOT Direction JO PAIGE SIVII 



fair; Dick, writing dog, food; Harry Breen, 
rood; "Dance Dream," pleasing; Blaon Four, 
pleasing; Jungman Troupe, very pleasing. 

LYCEUM (8. A H. ).—«-», "Fortune Hunter," 
turn away business; 10-11, "Smart Bet" 

VALENTINE (K. * E.).— Sept 10-1. Aborn 
Opera Co., food buslneaa; I. Donald Brian In 
"Siren." capacity bualneas; 10, "Secret of Bu- 
■anne"; It, "Madam Sherry." 



EMPIRE (Hurtle 
Whirl." big bualn« 



Seamon). — "Merry 



TOBONTO, OUT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea, mgr.).— Joseph Hart's 
Eternal Walts, great production, big success; 
Kitty Rooney, good; Primrose Four, har- 
monious; Linden Beckwlth, clever; Zelda Sears 
A Co., hit; Mario A Dunn, pleased; Crelghton 
Bros., popular. 

MAJESTIC (Peter F. Griffin, mgr.).— Will's 
Musical Comedy Co.; Harris A HUUard; Ar- 
mon A Armon; Mltzle Armont 

STRAND (E. W. Weill, mgr.)— Louise Fal- 
lon; Eugene Austin. 

ROYAL ALEXANDRA (L. Solman. mgr.). 
- -William Faversham In "Julius Caesar." 

PRINCESS (O. B. Sheppard, mgr.). — "The 
Pink Lady." HARTLEY. 

VIRGINIA, MINN. 

LYRIC (Henry Slgel. mgr.; W. V. M. A.; 
rehearsal Sunday and Thursday IS). — 29-2. 
Dawson A Eckhart, good; Australian Wheel- 
ers, excellent; Valorle Major, pretty; 3-6, Mr. 
A Mrs. Perkins Fischer, very good; Roiar's 
Dogs, fine; Charlea Varley, entertaining. 

ROYAL (R. A. McLean, mgr.; Webster; re- 
hearsal Sunday and Wednesday 12). — 29-1, 
Horn A Van Trio, good; Chase A Carma, ex- 
cellent; 2-5. Spedden A Herson, fair; Vincent 
A Lome, good. "RANGE." 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

CHASE'S (H. W. DeWltt, mgr.; U. B. O. ; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Mclntyre A Heath, 
comedians, headliner; Edith Helena, hit; Ous 
Van A Joe Schenck, scored; Bert Levy, car- 
toonist, clever; Max's Circus, amused; McCor- 



James Grady 



and Go. 



IN 



"At The Toll Bridge" 

PLAYING W. V. M. A. 
Direction, JO PAIGE SMITH. 




that irmr co/ff off 

ftfCPOMCLLS APf 
B00K£D WT/t MM 
Q/6HT Off 

THERES A 




COMING 

The 

Cromwells 

England 's 
Greatest Novel- 
ty Jugglers. 

Skill and 
Mystery. 

Is IT a Man or 
Woman T 

Perm. Address, 
Care of VARIETY 



M E 




O'Donnell Kaufman Wolf 

Working Steadily and Going Right to the Front 

STOPPING OFF AT THE 

UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK 

November 18th 

H. BART McHUGH IS THE CONDUCTOR 



mlck A Irving, applause; Claude M. Roode, 
well received. 

POLI'S (J. Thatcher, mgr.). — Harry Van A 
Co.. "A Night tn a Park." headliner; The 
Gaynoux. applause; Pletro, musical, encores; 
Morris A Kramer, well received; Bessie La 
Count, comedienne, hit; Mysterious "Edna," 
scored; Eckhoff A Gordon, clever. 

COSMOS (A. J. Brylawskl. mgr.; JefTerles; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Beltorelly A GUssando, 
musical, and the Pour Grohvlnls, acrobats, 
honors; Mack A Waters, hit; Georgaiaa A 
Broa, sharpshooters, applause; Bnowle May- 
belle, comedienne, encores; The Three Ro- 
meoe, musical, scored. 

CASINO (A. J. Bachrach, mgr.; JefTerles; 
rehearsal Monday 10). — Alber's Polar Bears, 
headliner; Ruth Curtis, scored; Brown & 
Bartolettl. applause; Pearl A Roth, encores; 
George Moore, Juggler, hit. 

GARDEN (Tom Moore, mgr. ; rehearsal Mon- 
day 10). — Win. J. O'Hearn A Co. in "Sweet 
Innlsfallen," well received; Hap Handy A Co, 
applause; Hilton A Hughes, singers, scored; 
Jack A Leola, comedy hit; Faustlne A Vurna, 
encores. 

NATIONAL (W. Rapley. mgr.; K. A E.).— 
Win. Farnum. In "The Littlest Rebel." (air 
business. 

BELASCO (L. 8. Taylor, mgr.; Shuberts).— 
Wm. Morris presents Annette Kellermann Id 
"Undine"; Harry Mayo A Co. In "Chinatown." 
and Tom Terrlss A Co., In "Scrooge," capacity 
houses. 

COLUMBIA (E. Berger. mgr.; Ind.).--"The 
Rose Maid," capacity houses. 

ACADEMY (J. Lyons, mgr.; S. A H.).— "A 
Fool There Was," 8. R. O. 

MAJESTIC (John Grieves, mgr.). — John 
Grieves' Musical Comedy Stock Co., in "The 
Big Little Princess," large crowds. 

LYCEUM (A. C. Mayer, mgr.). —"Miss New 
York, Jr." ERNIE. 



WHEELING. W. VA. 

ORPHEUM (J. F. Lee, mgr.. U B. O. ; re 
hoarsal Mon. A Thurs. 10). — Alexis A Schall. 
good; Billy Lussler A Art Evans, entertain- 
ing; Powers A Evans, well received; Fitzalm- 
Cameron, good; Captain Webb's Seals, well 
trained. C M. H. 



YOUNG8TOWN, O. 

PARK (L. B. Cool, mgr.; Felber A Shea).— 
Kip A Klppy, good; Delaphone, clever; 
O'Brien. Havel A Co.. hit; Minstrel Four, 
good; Howard A North, funny; Four McNallya. 
hit. 

G. O. H. (John Elliott, mgr.; 8. A H.).— 
"The Price," Oet 0. C. A. LEEDT. 



Fanny Verifier 

"Columbia Burlesquers" 

Management, JACOBS & JERMON 




Whin an. ertng aJvcrtUrwenta kindly mention " \RIETY. 



VARIETY 



39 




VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK OCTOBER 14 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED 

The routes given from OCT. 13 to OCT. 20, inclusive, dependent upon the opening 
end closing dsys of engagement In different parts of the country. All addressee are 
furnished VARIETY by artists. Addresses care newspapers, managers, or agents will 
not be printed. 

ROUTES FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK MUST REACH THIS OFFICE NO 
LATER THAN WEDNESDAY MORNING TO INSURE PUBLICATION. 

TEMPORARY ADDRESSES WILL BE CARRIED WHEN ACT IS "LAYING OFF." 






A. 



Abingdon ft Co W L Keiths Columbus O 

Adair ft Dahn Springfield 111 

Adams Samuel J Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

HlkfiT A«AA 

ADLER ^ ARLINE 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Colonial, Norfolk. 
"A NEW IDEA." 

ATeaTn^TgTes&^o^PalrLynchburg^Ta 
Altken Whitman Trio Orpheum Edmonton Can 
Albutris ft Millar Empire Nottingham 
Allen Luno Bertie 118 Central Osbkosh 
Alpba Troupe Shea's Toronto Can 
Alpine Troupe Ringling Bros C R 
Alvin Peter H Dresden Ohio 
Alwood Vera 17 W 58th NYC 
Andrews Abbott & Co 3962 Morgan St Louis 
Ardelle ft Leslie 19 Broezel Rochester 
Armalns 5 Plaza Chicago 111 
Atwood Vera 17 W 58 N Y 
Ayres Howard 903 N 66th St West Philadel- 
phia 

B. 

Baader A La Velle Spring Grove Springfield O 
Bacon Doc HI Henrys Minstrels 
Baldwin * Shea 847 Barry av Chicago 



Ballerini's Dogs 

WHIPS. NO COMMANDS. NO 1ARXJS 

D1r*ctloB BEEHLIB BEOS. 



MO 



Banan Alfred W Girls From Happyland B R 

BARBEE,HILL CO. 

Direction. BEEHLKB BROTHERS. 

Baraban Troupe 1304 Fifth ay N Y C 
Barnes A West National Sydney Australia 
Barnold Chas Davor Dorf Switzerland 
Barron Geo 2002 Fifth av N Y C 
Barry A Black 1523 Falrmount aT Phlla 
Bar tell A Garfield 2699 E 53 Cleveland 
Barto A Clark 2221 Cumberland av Phlla 
Bartos Three Queen Galveston Tex 
Bebren Musical 52 Springfield av Newark N J 
Bell A Bell 37 John Bloomfleld N J 
Belmont Joe 70 Brook London 
Belsac Irving 259 W 12 N Y C 
Bennett Klute A King Jahukes Cafe Los Ang 
Bentleys Musical 121 Clipper San Francisco 
Berg Bros Orpbeum Oakland Cal 
Berliner Vera 5724 Ridge Chicago 
Beverly Sisters 5722 Springfield av Phlla 
Billy & Burns 859 Home Bronx NYC 
Bimbos 872 Lawe Appleton Wis 
Bissett A Weston 5 Green st London Eng 
Black A Leslie 3722 Eberly av Chicago 
Blake A Amber 5th av N Y C 
Bogert & Nelson Grand Indianapolis 
Bowers, Walters A Crooker Winter Garden 

Berlin Ger indef 
Boyd A Allen 2706 Howard Kansas City 
Bradleys The 1314 Brush Birmingham 
Brennan George Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Breton Ted ft Corlnne 114 W 44 N Y C 
Brinkleya The 424 W 39 N Y C 
Brltton Nellie 140 Morris Philadelphia 
Brooks A Carlisle 38 Glenwood av Buffalo 
Brooks Thos A Girls From Happyland B R 

6 BROWN BROS 

Featured this Sesusoa with the Primrose 
BBJ Pockstader Mlastrels. 

Brown ft Brown 69 W 115 N Y C 
Brown ft Foster Empress Muskegon Mich 



Brown ft Wilraot 71 Qlen Mald<*n Maes 
Brydon ft Hanlon 26 Cottage Newark 
Burbank ft Danforth Berlin N Y 
Burke Minnie Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Burt Wm P ft Daughter 133 W 14 N Y C 
Byron Gleta 170 Blue Hill av Roxbury Mass 

C. 

Carmen Frank 465 W 163 N Y C 
Carmen Sisters 2183 Washington av N Y C 
Carroll Chas 429 E Kentucky Louisville 
Carroll Nettle Temple Grand Rapids 
Carrollton Mrs C G 1311 S Flower Los Ang 
Case Paul 31 S Clark Chicago 
Chameroys 1449 41 Brooklyn 
Chandler Claude 219 W 68 N Y C 
Chantrell ft Schuyler 219 Prospect av Bklyn 
Chapman Sisters 1629 Milburn Indianapolis 
Chase Uaye 90 Birch Lynn Mass 
Chatham Sisters 303 Grant Pittsburgh 
Cheers A Jones 318 W 59 N Y C 
Chubb Ray 107 Spruce Scranton Pa 
Chunns Four 19 Loughborough Rd London 
Church City Four 307 W 46 N Y C 
Clalrmont Josephine ft Co 246 W 128 N Y 
Clark A Ferguson 121 Phelps Englewood 
Clayton Zella Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Clifford Dave B 173 E 103 N Y C 
Close Bros 41 Howard Boston 
Coden A Clifford '21 Adams Roxbury Mass 
Coldeu Mark Colonial Sioux City 
Collins Will B Girls from Happyland B R 
Comets Four Musical B'way Lorain O 
Compton ft Plumb 2220 Emerson av Minneap 
Connolly Bros 1906 N 24 Philadelphia 
Cook Geraldlne 675 Jackson av N Y C 
Corbett ft Forrester 71 Emmet Newark N J 
Corelli ft Gillette Sheaa Toronto Can 
Costello ft La Croix 313 Ewelng Kansas City 
Cressy & Dayne Orpheum Des Moines la 
Cromwells 6 Dancroft Gardens London 
Cross ft Crown 1119 Nevada Toledo 
Cross & Josephine Union Sq N Y C 



CROUCH «° WELCH 

Dlreette*, M. S. BKNTHAM. 



Curtl Sam J Empress Cincinnati 

Crouch ft Schnell Royal Court Cleveland indf 

D. 

Darrell ft Conway Union Sq N Y C 
Dancing Violins Keiths Indianapolis 
Dare & Martin 4801 Calumet Chicago 
D'Arville Jeannette Philadelphia 
Davis ft Cooper 1920 Dayton Chicago 
Davis Mark Majestic La Ot§*§ Wis 
De Grace ft Gordon 922 Liberty Bklyn 
De Leo John B 718 Jackson Milwaukee 
De Milt Gertrude 813 Sterling pi Bklyn 
De Vere ft Roth 549 Belden av Chicago 
DeWitt Burns A Torance Orpheum Denver 
Dean ft Sibley 465 Columbus av Boston 
Deery Frank 204 West End av N Y C 
Delmar ft Delmar Sheas Buffalo N Y 
Delton Bros 261 W 38 N Y C 
Demonto ft Belle Englewood N J 
Devau Hubert 384 Prospect pi Bklyn 

Jim Diamond *«> Brennan «■» 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Alhamhra, New York 
Dlreetlon. M. S. Bentham. 

I>i' ktrson"TT!lbT7Tl^r^oger9™Tv Hklyn 
Dodd Emily ft Jessie 201 Division av Bklyn 
Donlter ft Co Garden Da. la* 
Donner ft Doris 343 Lincoln Johnstown Pa 
Doss Billy 102 High Columbus Tenn 
Doyle ft Fields 2348 W Taylor Chicago 



Earl Robert ft F C Vardel Lumberg Utica 
F^mand ft Qavlor Box .<') Richmond Ind 

ELINORE and WILLIAMS 

In "The Hunter and The Hunter-ess" 
Next Week (Oct. 14), Chase's Washington 
Direction, MAX HART. 

Ellnore ft Williams Chase's Washington 
Elson ft Arthur 456 E 149 N Y C 
Emelle Troupe 604 E Taylor Bloomlngton 111 
Emerald & Dupre National Sydney Australia 
Emmett Hugh J 305 W 72d st N Y C 
Engelbroth G W 2313 Highland av Cincinnati 
Espe ft Roth Pantages Portland Oregon 
Evans Bessie 3701 Cottage Grove av Chicago 
Evelyn Sisters 260 St James pi Bklyn 
Faiardaux Camllle Trocadero Burlesques B R 
Faversham William Teck Buffalo 
Feman Arthur 8 Girls from Happyland P R 

ADF.LE EDNA 

FERGUSON and NORTHLANE 

Next Week (Oct. IS), Orpheum, Spokane. 
Direction, ALBII, WEBKK * ■▼ANA, 

Ferguson Dick 68 W Bayonne N J 

Ferguson Frank 704 W 180 N Y C 

Fernandez Duo 1284 Lake Muskegan 

Ferry Alcazar Marseilles 

Fields Nettie 6302 S Halsted Chicago 

Finney Frank Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

Fitzslmmons ft Cameron Keith's Columbus O 

Florentine Singers Orpheum Winnipeg 

Flynn Frank D 65 W 123 N Y C 

Forbes ft Gowman 201 W 112 N Y C 

Ford Corinne Trocadero Burlesquers B R 

Fords Four 1949 84 st Bensonhurst L I 

Fox ft Summers 517 10 Saginaw Mich 

Fox & Ward Empress Milwaukee 

Francis Willard 67 W 128 N Y 

Frey Twins Proctors Newark 

Furman Radle 829 Beck st Bronx N Y 



Gaffney Sisters 1407 Madison Chicago 
Gardner Georgi 4646 Kenmore av Chicago 
Gates Earl Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Gaylor A Graff 383 Van Buren Brooklyn 

GEORGIA TRIO 

ALBERT EVANS 7, ELI, 
Dlr«etloa BBEHLBR BROS. 

■ 
Girard Marie 41 Howard Boston 
Gladstone ft Talmage 145 W 45 N Y C 
Godfrey A Henderson Orpheum Duluth 
Golden Claude Proctors 125th St N Y C 
Golden Max 5 Alden Boston 
Goldsmith ft Hoppe Orpheum Winnipeg 
Gordon Ed M 6116 Drexel av Chicago 
Gordon ft Barber 26 8 Locust Hagerstown Md 
Gomans Bobby 400 So 6 Columbus O 
Granat Louis M 783 Prospect av N Y C 
Gray ft Graham Vaudeville Club London 
Gray ft Gray 1922 Birch Joplin Mo 
Great Klrsch 323 18th av Newark 
Green Ethel Sherman Grand Calgary 
Grimm ft Elliott Majestic Dubuque 
Griffith John P Trocadero Burlesquers 13 R 
Guilfoyle 6 Charlton 206 Harrison Detroit 

H. 

Hall ft Co Billy Pol If Waterbury 
Halls Dogs 111 Walnut Revere Mass 
Halson Boys 21 B 98 N Y C 
Halton Powell Co Colonial Indianapolis indef 
Harcourt Frank Girls from Happyland B R 
Harris Maude Girls from Happyland B R 
Harrlty Johnnie 708 Harrison av Scranton 
Hart Maurice 156 Lenox av N Y C 
Harrison West Trio Victoria Norfolk 
Harvey ft Irving 1553 Broadway NYC 
Hawthorne Hilda Orpheum Spokane 
Haydn Dunbar & Haydn Orpheum Brooklyn 
Hazzard Lynne A Bonnie Precllla Cleveland 
Henry Frank J Girls from Happyland B R 
Henry Girls 2326 So 71 Philadelphia 
Herberts The 47 Washington Lynn 

Hill, Cherry and Hill 

la Groteeqae Oddities (New Act). 
IMreetloa, BEEBXBB BROS. 

Hill ft Ackerman Moss Tour Eng 
Hlllman ft Roberts 516 E 11 Saginaw Mich 
Hippodrome 4 Bowery Burlesquers B R 
Hoffman Dave 2241 E Clearfield Phlla 
Holman Harry & Co Tyrone Oklahoma 
Holmes Norlne Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Holt Alf 755 Fifth Milwaukee 
Hood Sam 721 Florence Mobile Ala 
Hopkins Lola Axtell Majestic Milwaukee 
Hopp Fred 326 Littleton av Newark N J 
Howard Comedy Four 983 3 av Bklyn 



At Hammer8tein's Next Week (October 14) 



toward Harry ft Mae 222 8 Peoria Chicago 
Howard Jack Girls from Happyland B R 
Howard ft White 5911 Grand Blvd Chicago 
Hoyt A Starks 15 Bancroft pi Bklyn 
Hufford A Chain Poll Hartford 
Hulbert A De Long 4416 Madison Chicago 
Hunter A Ross Gayety Indianapolis 

I. 

Inman Billy Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Irwin Flo 221 W 45 N Y C 

J. 

Jansen Chas Bowery Lurle>tue r s B R 
Jarrell Company 3044 W Madison Chicago 
Jerge Louis Bijou Flint Mich 
Jerge A Hamilton Lyric Charleston S C 
Johnson Great 257 W 37 N Y C 
Johnstons Musical Middlesex London stag 
Juno A Wells 511 B 78 N Y C 



Karroll Great Electric White Plains. N Y 

Kaufman Reba A Inez Columbia St Louis 

Kaufmanns The Hess Lake Newaygo Mich 

Kelsey Sisters 4832 Christiana av Chicago 

Kenney A Hollls Howard Boston 

Kenton Dorothy Felix Portland Hotel NYC 

Kesner Rose A Adele 438 W 164 N Y C 

King Bros 211 4 av Schenectady 

King Four 205 N Kentucky av Atlantic City 

Klrsch The Great 323 18th av 

Knight Bros A Sawtelle 4450 Sheridan rd Chic 

Krona Arthur ft Bessie 200 N 54 Philadelphia 



LA MAZE TRIO 

(t Faole Md • Table*) 
OBPHKCM CIRCUIT. 

Lake Jas J Girls from Happylaod B R 
Lamont Harry 20 Clinton Johnstown N Y 
Lane Chris 4357 Kenmore av Chicago 
Lane Eddie 305 B 73 N Y C 
Lane ft O'Donnell Folles Bergere Brussels 

Belgium 
Langdons The Chases Washington 
Laning Arthur Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Lansear Ward K 232 Schaefer Bklyn 
La Centra A La Rue 2461 2 av N Y C 
La Fleur Joe Ringling Bros C R 
La Maze Trio Orpheum San Francisco 
La Toska Phil Orpheum Juliet 
Lashe Great 1611 Kater Phlla 
Lawrence ft Wright 56 Copeland Roxbury Uass 
Layton Marie 252 E Indiana St Charles 111 
Le Roy Geo 36 W 115 N Y C 
Leonard Gus 280 Manhattan av N Y C 
Leslie Elsie Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Levy Family 47 W 129 N Y C 
Linton ft Jungle Girls 1085 So Penn Denver 
Lockwoods Musical 132 Cannon Poughkeepsie 
London ft Riker 32 W 08 N Y C 
Lorch Family Circus Schuman Berlin Ger 
Lowell Esther Drew Pantages Tacoma 
Lynn Oils Bowery Burlesquers B R 
Lutgen Hugo Empress Wltchlta 



MacDonald Dr Howard Boston 
Magee ft Kerry Orpheum Racine Wla 
Malloy Dannie 11 Glen Morris Toronto 
Mann ft Franks Terrey London 
Manning Trio 154 N Wanamaker Phlla 
Mantell Harry Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Mardo A Hunter Grand O H Osbkosh Wis 
Marathon Comedy Four 809 W 28 N Y C 
Marriott Twins Gran Clrco Brown Buenos 

Ayres S A 
Mason A Pearse Van Cortlandt Hotel NYC 
Matthews Mabel 2031 Burling Chicago 
Mayer Arthur Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Mayson Frank 308 Madison Minn 
McConnell Slaters 1247 Madison Chicago 
MoCune A Grant 636 Benton Pittsburgh 
McDuff James Majestic Galveston 



JOCK 



cK A Y 



SCOTOB COMEDIAN. 
Who asks for applause and gets It without 
asking, ovsr la Scotland. Com., Pat Casey. 

McGarry A Harris 521 Palmer Toledo 

McMAHON and CHAPPELLE 

Playing United Time. 
Direetien, JEN IB JACOBS. 



McWsters A Tyson 471 60 Bklyn 
Methen Sisters 12 Culton Springfield Mats 
Meuther A Davis 342 E 86 N Y C 
Milliard Bros (Bo A Bill) Pantages Tacoma 
Montam Co ft Wells Keitb's Boston 
Mozarts The Empress Chicago 



5 Melody Maids ■ Will J. Ward 



5 Pretty Girls — One Man — and 5 Pianos. 



DIRECTION: 






The Classiest Piano Act in the World 



N 



HMANN 



Wh n mwuHring «4uertis#m#n»s kindly mention VARIETY. 



40 



VARIETY 



LILLIAN MORTIMER 

Vaudeville— I'nlted time 
AIHKK WIBtt ft HVANW 

Musical Cliftons Lyric liutler Pa 
Musketeers Three 240 W 39 N Y C 

N. 

Neary Bliss & Ross 450 E Main Bridgeport 
.Wiser Henry Field Minstrels 



PAUL 



RUBY 



NEVINSandERWOOD 

Management, Max B. Hayes, United Time. 

Nevlns & Erwood 249 17 av Paterson indef 
Newport & Bert Broadway Columbus O 
Nichols Nelson Troupe Colonial Sioux City 
Nonette 617 Flatbush av Bklyn 
Nos8»»s Musical New Brighton Pa 

O. 

O'Connor Trio 706 W Allegheny ay Phlla 

P. 
Parker ft Morrell 187 Hopkins Brooklyn 
Plerlot Francis Liberty Philadelphia 
Powers Elephants 740 Forest av N Y C 
Proctor Ada 1112 Halsey Brooklyn 



Qulnlan Josle 644 N Clark Chicago 



Ragtime Trio The Arcade Minot N D 
Halmond Jim 818 Dakin Chicago 
Kawls 6 Von Kaufman Colonial Dayton O 
Redmond Trio 251 Halsey Bklyn 
Redway Juggling 141 Inspector Montreal 
Renal lea The 2064 Sutter San Francisco 
Roberts C E 1851 Sherman av Denver 
Roberts ft Downey 36 Lafayette Detroit 
Rogers Ed Girls from Happyland B R 
Roller Henry 91 Trenton East Boston 
Rosenthal Don & Bro 151 Champlain Rochstr 
Roy ft Wilson Bijou Augusta Ga 

S. 
Schroder Carol Girls from Happyland B R 
Schulte Geo 1014 Sedgwick Chicago 
Scully Will P 8 Webster pi Bklyn 
Sears Gladys Dantes Daughters B R 

ZELDA SEARS 8? 

Next Week (Oet. 14), Keith's, Toledo. 
Plreetten MAX MAJfcT. 

Selton Larry Syndons Omaha 
Shaw Edith Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Sherlock Frank 514 W 135 N Y C 
Sherman ft De Forest Jefferies Saginaw 
Shermans Two 252 St Emanuel Mobile 
Shields Sydney ft Co Orpheum Sioux City 
Simons Murray J Trocadero Burlesquers B R 
Smith Lee 23 Vienna Newark N J 
Springer ft Church 3 Esther Terrace Plttsfld 
Stanley Harry Grant Hotel Chicago 
Stanley Stan 905 Bates Indianapolis 
Stanwood Davis 364 Bremen E Boston 
Steln-Hume-Thomas Orpheum New Orlean La 
Steppe A H 33 Barclay Newark 
Stevens E J 498 Marion Bklyn 
Stevens Paul 323 W 28 N Y C 
Stewart Sisters Orpheum Memphis 
St Claire Annie Central Atlanta indef 
Stone Paul & Marmion Majestic Ft Worth 
Sully Dan & Lora Park Spencer Mass 
Sullivan James F 359 Court Brooklyn 
Summers Allen 1956 W Division Chicago 



Temple Luella Girls from Happyland B R 
Terrls Charles Wadsworth N Y 
Thomson Harry Garrlck Burlington la 
Tlnney Frank Colonial Chicago Indf 
Travers Billy Monte Carlo Girls B R 

U. 
Unique Comedy Trio 1927 Nicholas Phlla 
Universal Four 1760 Greene av Bklyn 

V. 

Van Bros Orpheum Denver 

Van Fred C Keith's Philadelphia 

Van Chas ft Fannie Keith's Philadelphia 

Vagges The Grand Circuit South Africa 

Valdare Troupe Queen Galveston 

Valentine & Bell 1451 W 103 Chicago 

Van ft Bates 5 W 104 N Y C 

Van Dalle Sisters 514 W 135 NYC 

CHAS. an. FANNIE VAN 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Keith's, Philadelphia. 

Van Horn Bobby 139 West Dayton 
Variety Comedy Trio 1515 Barth Indianapolis 
Va8s Victor V 85 Bishop Providence 
Venetian Serenaders 676 Blackhawk Chicago 
Vernon ft Parker 187 Hopkins Bklyn 
Village Comedy Four 1912 Ringgold Phlla 
Vincent & Slager 820 Olive Indianapolis 
Vino Val Rlngllng Bros C R 
Violetta Jolly 41 Leipzlger Berlin Oer 

W. 

Walkrr Musical Rlngllng Bros C R 
Walker & 111 202 Warren E Providence 
Walker & Stum 55 Rallw'y av Melbourne Aus 
Wnllace & Van 679 E 24 Paterson 
Ward ft Bohlman Taxi Girls J \l 
Warde Mack 300 W 70 N Y C 



Washburn Dot 1930 Mohawk Chicago 

Watson Billy W Girls from Happyland B R 



KATE WATSON 



NEXT WKKK (Oct. 14). 
WM. PENN, PHILADELPHIA. 

Watson Nellie Girls from Happyland B R 
Watson Sammy 333 St Pauls av Jersey City 
Weber Chas D 826 Tasker Phlla 
Weil John 5 Krusstadt Rotterdam 
Welsh Harry Monte Carlo Girls B R 
Welch Jas A 211 E 14 N Y C 
Wells Lew 213 Shawmut av Grand Rapids 
Wenrlck ft Waldron 542 Lehigh Allentown 
West John ft Co Star Hudson N Y 
Western Union Trio 2241 E Clearfield Phlla 
Weston Edgar 246 W 44 N Y C 
Weston Dan E 141 W 116 N Y C 
Wheeler Bert Majestic Houston 
White Kane & White 393 Vermont Bklyn 
Whitney Tlllle 36 Kane Buffalo 
Whittle W E Whittle Farm Caldwell N J 
Wllkerson John N 1720 Baltic av Atlantic City 
Williams Clara 3450 Tremont Cleveland 
Williams Chas 2625 Rutgers St Louis 
Williams ft Gilbert 1010 Marsfield av Chic 



Herbert Williams and Hilda Wolfus 

IMano-fun-ology 
Direction. BEEHLKB BROS. 

Williams ft Stevens 3516 Calumet Chicago 
Wilson a Aubrey 489 So 12 Newark 
Wilson Jack E 5430 Loom Is Chicago 
Wilson Lottie 2208 Clifton av Chicago 
Wilson Raleigh 210 N 22 Lincoln 
Wilson ft Ward 2744 Grays Ferry av Phlla 
Winkler Kress Trio Fair Brockton Mass 
Wise ft Milton Brennan Circuit New Zealand 
Wlxon ft Conley 30 Tecumseh Providence 
Wood Ollle 524 W 152 N Y C 



Xavlera Four 2144 W 20 Chicago 

Y. 

Yeomans Geo 150 W 36 N Y C 
Young ft April Poll Springfield Mass 
Young ft Sister Orpheum Duluth 
Young ft Young 215 W 111 N Y C 

Z. 

Zahrah ft Zelmar. 126 Atkins Menden Can 
Zanfrellas 131 Brixton London 
Zlg Zag Trio 309 W 43 N Y C 
Zolas 234 W 48 N Y C 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



WEEKS OCT. 14 AND 21. 

Americans Gayety St Paul 21 L O 28 Krug 
Omaha 

American Beauties Gayety Kansas City 21 
Gayety Omaha 

Auto Girls Empire Newark 21-23 Orpheum 
Paterson 24-26 Columbia 8c ran ton 

Beauty Youth A Folly Garden Buffalo 21 
Corinthian Rochester 

Behmans Show Gayety Boston 21 Columbia 
New York 

Ben Welchs Burlesquers Gayety Toledo 21 Co- 
lumbia Chicago 

Big Gaiety Gayety Philadelphia 21 Gayety 
Baltimore 

Big Review Peoples Cincinnati 21 Empire 
Chicago 

Bohemians Star Toronto 21 Lafayette Buffalo 

Bon Tons Murray Hill New York 21-23 L O 
24-26 Bridgeport 

Bowery Burlesquers Gayety Philadelphia 21 
Music Hall New York 

Cherry Blossoms Grand Milwaukee 21 Gayety 
Minneapolis 

College Girls Star Brooklyn 21-23 Empire Ho- 
boken 24-26 Empire Paterson 

Columbia Girls 14-16 Empire Hoboken 17-19 
Empire Paterson 21 Gayety Newark 

Cracker Jacks 14-16 L O 17-19 Bridgeport 21 
Westminster Providence 

Daffydils Buckingham Louisville 21 Empire 
Indianapolis 

Dandy Girls Krug Omaha 21 Century Kansas 
City 

Dantes Daughters Howard Boston 21 Grand 
Milwaukee 

Dazzlers Gayety Brooklyn 21 Olympic New 
York 

Follies Day Standard St. Louis 21 Bucking- 
ham Louisville 

Gay Masqueraders Music Hall New York 21 
Murray Hill New York 

Gay White Way Gayety St Louis 21 Gayety 
Kansas City 

Gay Widows Empire Chicago 21 Grand Mil- 
waukee 

Ginger Girls 14-16 Empire Paterson 17-19 
Empire Hoboken 21 Casino Philadelphia 

Girls Happyland Standard Cincinnati 21 Gay- 
ety Louisville 

Girls Joyland Eighth Ave New York 21 How- 
ard Boston 



Girls Missouri L O 21 Krug Omaha 

Girls Reno Empire Philadelphia 21 Casino 
Brooklyn 

Golden Crook Gayety Boston 21-23 Ollmore 
Springfield 24-26 Empire Albany 

Halting* Big 8how Gayety Louisville 21 Gay- 
ety 8t Louis 

High Life Burlesque Empire Brooklyn 21 
Empire Newark 

Howes Lovemakers Star ft Garter Chicago 21 
Gayety Detroit 

Jardln de Paris Lafayette Buffalo 21-23 Co- 
lumbia Scranton 24-26 Orpheum Paterson 

Jolly Follies Olympic New York 21-23 Em- 
pire Paterson 24-26 Empire Hoboken 

Knickerbockers Gayety Detroit 21 Gayety To- 
ronto 

Lady Buccaneers Grand Boston 21 Bronx New 
York 

Marions Dreamland Westminster Providence 
21 Gayety Boston 

Merry-Go Rounders Gayety Montreal 21-23 
Empire Albany 24-26 Franklin Sq Worces- 
ter 

Merry Maidens Bronx New York 21 Empire 
Brooklyn 

Merry Whirl Columbia Chicago 21 Standard 
Cincinnati 

Midnight Maids 14-16 Empire Albany 17-10 
Franklin Bq Worcester 21 Casino Boston 

Miss New York Jr Penn Circuit 21 Star Cleve- 
land 

Mollle Williams 14-16 Ollmore Springfield 17- 
19 Empire Albany 21 Gayety Brooklyn 

Monte Carlo Girls Casino Brooklyn 21 Eighth 
Ave New York 
' Moulin Rouge Empire Baltimore 21 Lyceum 
Washington 

New Century Girls Century Kansas City 21 
Standard St Louis 

Orientals Bowery New York 21 Empire Phil- 
adelphia 

Pacemakers 14-16 Orpheum Paterson 17-10 
Columbia Scranton 21 Trocadero Philadel- 
phia 

Queens Follies Bergere Avenue Detroit 21 
Star Toronto 

Queens Paris Empire Cleveland 21 Gayety 
Toledo 

Reeves Beauty Show Corinthian Rochester 21- 
23 Bastable Syracuse 24-26 L O 28 Gayety 
Montreal 

Robinsons Crusoe Girls L O 21 Star ft Gar- 
ter Chicago 

Rosebuds Gayety Minneapolis 21 Gayety St 
Pau' 

Rose Sydells Columbia New York 21 Star 
Brooklyn 

Runaway Girls 14-16 Bastable Syracuse 17- 
10 L O 21 Gayety Montreal 

Social Maids Gayety Pittsburgh 21 Empire 
Cleveland 

Star ft Garter Gayety Omaha 21 L O 28 Star 
ft Garter Chicago 

Star of Stageland Trocadero Philadelphia 21 
Empire Baltimore 

Taxi Girls Gayety Washington 21 Gayety 
Pittsburgh 

Tiger Llllles Star Cleveland 21 Peoples Cin- 
cinnati 

Trocaderos Gayety Toronto 21 Garden Buffalo 

Watsons Beef Trust Folly Chicago 21 Avenue 
Detroit 

Whirl of Mirth Lyceum Washington 21 Penn 
Circuit 

Winning Widows Gayety Baltimore 21 Gayety 
Washington 

World of Pleasure Gayety Newark 21 Gayety 
Philadelphia 

Yankee Doodle Girls Empire Indianapolis 21 
Folly Chicago 

Zallah's Own 14-16 Columbia Scranton 17-19 
Orpheum Paterson 21 Bowery New York 



LETTERS 

Where O follows name, letter Is In Chi- 
cago. 

Advertising or circular lestecs of any 
description will not be listed When Known. 

P following name indicates postal, ad- 
vertised once only. 



▲ 
Abbotts The (C) 
Admont Mltzle 
Adonis W H 
Alexandria Max (C) 
All Harry 
Allen Eva 
Alvarados (C) 
Apollo Trio 
Areola (C) 
Asahl Klchi 
Aubry Rena Miss 



Babcock Theo 
Baker Alice H 
Baker Ray 
Balser A H 
Barnes H D (C) 
Barra Mabel Miss 
Barron T S (C) 
Barry Jlmmle 
Barry Marlon 
Bedford & Winchester 
Belmont Dollle 
Bennett Klute ft King 
Uernle Mrs L 
Bernlvlcl Bros 
Bergere Rose (P) 
Bornholdt Emma (C) 
Boyjie Hazel 
Bradley Chas "Speck" 
Brant Chas 



Brlce Charlie 
Brown Al 
Brown Blllle P 
Brown Bothwell 
Brown Walter (P) 
Browning Bessie (C) 
Browning Lillian 
Budd Bert 
Bundmaster Victor 



Caputo Frank 
Carson Evelyn 
('arson Herbert J 
Carlisle Bertha 
Cassel Lillian 
Chartres Sisters ft 

Holiday (C) 
Chester Ernest 
Christopher Joe (C) 
Claire Brownie (C) 
Clark Evelyn (C) 
Clifford Kl«a 
Clifford & Frank 
Close Bros 
Coite Mnrguerlte 
Codalro Harry 
CnleniHii Wm J 
Conrad Ethel ft L 

Urahm 
Core John 
Costello & La Croix 
Courtney Mabel 



Courtney Cyril 
Craige Florence (C) 



Davis Josephine 
Dazle La Belle 
Deas, Reed ft Deas 
Decrle Helen (C) 
Desmonds Millie 
Delevantl Arthur (C) 
De Lisle ft Vernon 
Du Lorls Mrs (C) 
Dempsey Jack 
Dervln J T 
Dooley, Francis J 
Dooley Kid Bill 
Drapers The 
Drew Sidney 
Duffleld Effle (C) 
Dunn Wm J 
Dunbar Buster 
Duple Jeanette 
Durgln Geo 
Duval Helen 
Dyso Jim 

E 
Edmond Grace 
Edwards ft Burns 
Edwards Tanls 
Empress Marie 
Evans Geo 
Everdean Frederick 



Fagan Barney (C) 
Fisher Wesley 
Florence ft Co (C) 
Foster Allan 
Friedman J 
Friendly Dan 
Fuller William 
Fulton Maude 

G 

Curley Grate (C) 
Gasklll Clarence (P) 
Glenler M 
Cilldea Jlmmle 
Oirard Frank 
Gonne Lillian 
Oordon Dahn 
Gordons The Flying 
Gould Rita 
Granger Wm F 



' 



M 

Mack C J Mrs 
Mack Wilbur 
Manchester J H (C> 
Marnell & Coasineau 
Mason Wm (C) 
Mathers John 
May Devona (C) 
McCall Sturgis 
McGee Jack (C) 
McMahon Tim 
McNabb Howard 
Mcltae Mort 
Meehan William (C) 
Melton Frank 
Mendizo M (C) 
Merrill Cora 
Merlou Clara 
Milton Fred (P) 
Mitchell Thomas 
Moore Jack 
Morris Jessie 
Morrisey & Hanlon 
Murphy Jack 
Murphy W H 
Musette 
Musical Splllers Five 



N 
Nellson Francis 
Nelson ft Norwood 
Nestor Ned (C) 
Neville Augustus 
Nordon Archie 









O'Connor Joseph (C) 
O'Connor Sisters (C) 
O'Donnell C H 
O'Donnell John 
O'Hara Kitty 
O'Karos The 
O'Neill Emma 
Onrl Archie 
Orville Victoria (C) 
Overing William 



Palmer George 
Palmer Minnie 
Perrigo Kitty (C) 
Peters Johnny 
Pltrot Richard 



H 

Hall Stella (C) 
Hanlon Chas 
Harris John 
Hart Billy 
Hart ft Veale 
Harten Fred 
Harvey Bert 
Hatch Warren 
Hawkins Jack 
Haywood Jessie 
Haywood Maud (C) 
Hendricks Mae Miss 
Herman Jack (C) 
lligglns David 
Hobbs Lucy 
Hodgkln Gene 
Hoffman Max 
Howard Chas 
Hughes Geo 
Hyatt Lowey 



Ingrnm Beatrix 



Jacobs Alice M 

K 
Kahl Sam 
Kal lesser M W 
Kane V Miss 
Kathleen Miss 
Kaufman Reba ft Inez 

(O 
Kauthe Bros 
Kawana Bros 
Kay Harry 
Kearney Anna 
Keene Mattle 
Keller Josle 
Kelly Capt Jack 
Kendall Ebra Jr 
Kennedy Beulah 
Kenny Nobody & Piatt 
King Louis 
Klrtland Edith 
Knight Otis 
Kremka Toney 



I.#a Rains Prof 
Lamb W A Mr 
Lansing Mae 
Lawrence Bert 
Lawrence Oertrude (P) 
Lnwson & Namon 
Lee Carter Virginia 
Leo & Chapman 
Leslie Frank (P) 
LesBO 

Lester Harry 
T/ester Hugh 
Lewis Maybell 
Lewis Sam B 
Lewis Van 
Lewis ft Chapln 
Llmls Lillian 
Llndholme Chas (C) 
Lorgnorme Crepnux 
Louis King 
Loveland Lelah 
Luclo Lnncton 
Luders Guslav 
Lyon Dorothy (C) 



r Quirk Billy 



Ramey Maree 
Raymond ft Stamford 
Relnck's Horses 
Remy Jack 
Remy Jack (C) 
Renle Juggling 
Retten Mabel T 
Rigby Arthur 
Rlvoll A 
Rockner Marie 
Rogers ft Dorman (C) 
Rogers Ed (C) 
Rosen Jas B 
Ross Delia 
Rossrayn Nellie 
Ryan Elsie 
Russell Flo (C) 



Salisbury ft Benny (C) 
Saxones Eight (C) 
Schade Fritz (C) 
Seaton Blllle 
Serres N J (P) 
Shaffner Llllyn 
Sharp ft Lurek 
Simpson Cora 
Sinnott Francis 
Sloan W H 
Smally Ed 
Smith George 
Smith Margaret 
St Ella Rlccardo 
St Elmo Miss 
Storey Belle 

T 

Tannen Julius 
Temple 8 W 
Terry Walt 
Therece Marie 
Thomas Hilda 
Thor M 
Trenor Frank (C) 

V 

Vannerson The (C) 
Vernoy Franklyn B 
Verta Dan 
Vincent Sidney 
Vivian George 
Vontella ft Nina 

W 

Walck Ezra 
Walsh ft Lynch 
Watson Jessie 
Watts ft Lucas 
Weber Chas D 
Weber Chas (C) 
Webb Eddy 
Wells Toby (P) 
West Lew 
West Willis (C) 
Wrston ft Bently 
Whitehead Ralph 
Whiteside Pearl 
Wilbur Clarence (P) 
Wllllsch Theo 
Wilson Duke (C) 
Wlstor ft Bently 
World A Kingston 
Wyckoff Fred 



FREE 



DATE BOOK 

Mention thia paper 

The M. STEIN COSMETIC CO. 

NEW YORK 



MQTEIN'SMAKECP 



When enawerlng adr rrti&etnentu kindly mention VARIBTY. 



VARIETY 



THE FOX AGENCY 

EDWARD P. KEALEY, Manager 
212 WEST 42nd ST., NEW YORK Phone, 1247 Bryant 



41 



IO WEEKS IN NEW YORK OITY 

Playing Vaudeville'. Beet Aeta. 

BOOKING 

City Theatre— Riverside Theatre— Washington Theatre— Nemo Theatre 
— Gotham Theatre — Star Theatre— Dewey Theatre— Folly Theatre— 
Comedy Theatre — Grand Opera Hoate. 
NEWARK:— Washington Theatre— NEW HAVEN:— Grand Opera House. 



Ernest Edelsten 

VARIETY AND DRAMATIC AOENT. 
XT Green St., Leicester Square, LONDON, 

Sole Representative. 
John Tiller's Companies Walter C. Kelly 

Little Tlch. Two Bobs. Wee Georgle Wood. 
ALWAYS VACANCIES FOB GOOD ACTS. 



Hammerstein's 
Victoria 



AMERICA'S MOST 

FAMOUS VARIETY 

THEATRE 



OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 



FRED MARDO 



WITH 



The United Booking Offices 

Boston Branch 



182 TREMONT ST. 



BIJOU ARCADE BUILDING 



BOSTON, MASS. 



GRIFFIN CIRCUIT 

The Hide away big- time circuit. No acts too bis- Exclusive agents. Write or wire PETER 
F. GRIFFIN, Booking Agent. Griffin Vaudeville Circuit, Variety Bid*., Toronto. Can. 
Can epen acta at Toronto, Sarnla, Ottawa, Sault Ste. Marie or Niagara Falls. 

BERT LEVEY 



I 



NDEPENDENT CIRCU VAUDEVILLE 



ARTISTS' NOTICE 

Brennan-FuMer 

Vaudeville Circuit 

(AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND) 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS WRITE 

REFINEMENT ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL 

COARSE OR SLOVENLY ACTS 

SAVE POSTAGE 

All Communications to BEN. J. FULLER 
Managing Director, Sydney, N. S. W. 

THEATRES 

SYDNEY, Amphitheatre. 
SYDNEY, Balmaln. 
MELBOURNE, National. 
MELBOURNE, Gaiety. 
ADELAIDE, King's. 
BRISBANE, Theatre Royal. 
AUCKLAND (N. Z.), Opera House. 
WELLINGTON, Theatre Royal. 
CHRISTCHURCH, Opera House. 
DINEDIN. King's Theatre. 

SILENCE A POLITE NEGATIVE. 



HAVE YOUR CARD IN 

VARIETY 



GOOD ACTS ALWAYS WANTED. 

PHIL HUNT 

7ht Floor, Cohan Theatre (Fitzgerald) Bid* 

N. Y. REPRESENTATIVE 

Howard Athenaeum Boston 

Grand Opera House Boston 

Bowdoln Square Theatre Boston 

Booking, 46 Eastern Vaudeville Theatres. 

NEW THEATRE 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Acts dsslrlng to BREAK THEIR JUMPS 
COMING EAST OR GOING WEST 

Send In your Open Time. NO SUNDAY 

Show. Mention Lowest Salary. Include 

Program. 

GEORGE SCHNEIDER. Manager. 

New York Office: — S07 Gaiety Theatre Bldg. 

JOHN QUIGLEY 

New England Vaudeville Circuit, 
American representative for W. SCOTT 
ADACKER, of London and the 

New England Vaudeville Circuit 

hooking the best aet at all times In the 
best theatres of New England, Canada 
and New York. Main offices 88 Boy U too St., 
Boston, Mass.; Gaiety Theatre Building, New 
York City. 

NOVELTY ACTS: SINGLES— TEAMS. 
Write or wire 

J. H. ALOZ 

Canadian Theatres Booking Agency, 

Orp henna Theatre Bldg., 

MONTREAL. P. Q. 



Plenty of Time for Recognised Acta That Respect Contracts. Acts desiring time communi- 
cate Direct to EXECUTIVE OFFICE: Alcazar Theatre Bldg., O'Farrell St., near Powell. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



BOOKING OFFICES 
J. C. MATTHEWS. 
General Booking 
Representative, 
SB So. Dearborn St., 
Chicago. 
LOUIS PINCUS 
New York Repre- 
sentative, Gayety 
Theatre Blag. 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES, lac. 

ALEXANDER PANTAGES 
President and Manager 

SEATTLE 



Ieuropean office 

Berlin, Germany. 

RICHARD PITROT 

Representative. 



BRANCH OFFICES 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

DENVER. 



FREEMAN BERNSTEIN 

Manager, Promoter and Producer of Vaudeville Acts. 

4th Floor, FITZGERALD BLDG., NEW YORK. 

OPEN NIGHT AND DAY. Cable "Freeborn, New York/' 



DOUTRICK'S 



I 



OHIO'S LEGITIMATE VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 



Acts Jumping Bast or West 
Write in Advance 



THE R. J. MORRIS AGENCY 

406 Columbia Building, Cleveland, Ohio 



HERE'S A NEW ONE 



EDGAR ALLEN-M. S. EPSTIN, u» 



1482-90 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



ROOMS 1012-1012A 



PHONE 7696 BRYANT 
FITZGERALD BLDG. 



VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS AND PROMOTERS 



WRITE WIRE CALL PHONE 



WE CAN BOOK YOU RIGHT AWAY 



MR. EDGAR ALLEN formerly of Weber A Allen) 
Office and Business Manager 



CMS. I. DOUTtlCK, Prop, at. Mi-.-er IN BSBTN La SALLE ST.. CHICASO 

WANTED 

New Acts. Nsw Faces, Recognised Big Feature Acta, Good Comedy Sketches, Novelty and 

Musical Acts, etc., for Immediate and future time. 
BOOKING First Class Vaudeville Houses In Chicago, and II Houses In 111. Jumpe from 40 

eta to |4. Also New Houses In Ind . Iowa, Wta 
PERFORMERS— If you have one or more weeks open, write, wire or phono. 



PLAYING THE B 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



SULLIVAN and CONSIDINE CIRCUIT 



GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICE: 
Sullivan and Consldlne Bldg., Third and 
Madison Streets, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 
FRED LINCOLN.. ..Gen. Mgr. 



GENERAL BOOKING OFFICE: 
1465 BROADWAY— HEIDELBERG BLDG. 
NEW YORK CITY 



CHRIS O. BROWN. 



BRANCH BOOKING OFFICES: PAUL GOUDRON. 6 North Clark St., cor. Madison, Chi- 
cago. 111.; MAURICE J. BURNS, Sd and Madison 8ts.. Seattle. Wash.; W. P. REESE, OCK 
Market St., San Francisco, Cat.; B. OBERMAYER, 16 Greene St., London. Eng. 

ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 

lie 
ACTS WANTING EASTERN BOOKINGS 
CALL WIRE WRITE PHONE 

KNICKERBOCKER THE ATM BUILDING. 1402 BROADWAY. NEW YORK, SUITE 828-630 5217 8 GREELEY 



of all performers going to Europe make their steamship arrangements through 
mr. Tho following huv : Willy I'antser Troupe, Ernst Pantser Trio, Harry 

A Richards, Ida Rene, Klre A Prevost, Will 
Rose, Rooney Sisters, Chris Richards, Arrhle 



jj /JO Pllcer, Phillip Sisters, Quintan 
w ' Rogers, Rons A Lewis, Julian 

Royer, Billy Ritchie, Theresa Bens. 

PAUL TAUS1G, 104 E 

German Savings Bank Bldg. 



14th St.. New York City. 

Telephone Btuyvesant I09t. 



THEGUS SUN BOOKING EXCHANGE CO 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

S 8 U N 9 General Manager 

BRANCH OFFICES, CHICAGO, PITTSBURG, NEW YORK 

Arranging routes of from ten to forty weeks for acts of recognised merit. 
Immediate time for a few new novelties. 



C H. MILES, President 



I. FLUEGELMAN, Vice-President 



M. R. SHEEDY, Secretary 



BENJ. S. MOSS, Treasurer 



CONSOLIDATED BOOKING OFFICES, JSL. 

Fitzgerald Building, BROADWAY AT 43rd STREET, NEW YORK CITY TdephoMt. 5451 1452-5453 3213 Bry.nt 

CHICAGO OFFICES: 121 N. CLARK ST. 'Phoes. 1031 Randolph BOSTON OFFICES: IBS TREMONT ST. Phone. 2970 Oxford 

Playing tha beat In vaudeville, boot houses, best treatment, beet engagements 



BOOKING 

MILKS CIRCUIT SHEEDY CIRCUIT 

CUNNINGHAM-FLUEGELMAN CIRCUIT 

MOSS A BRILL CIRCUIT 

THEATRE BOOKING CORPORATION 

ARTISTS— SEND IN OPEN TIME 

4* CONSECUTIVE WEEKS 



When an >:rimj advcrtisimrnts kind' mrntmn VAUIETY. 



42 



VARIETY 



PBODUOTM>M 

■ D. F. 



REYNARD 

Presents Seth Dowberry and Jawu Jbwmw b 

"A MORNIN6 IN HICKSYILLR." 

Direction, GBNB HUGHES. 



Gene Hughes 

PUTNAM BUILDINO, 14SS BBOADWAY, 
NSW YORK. 



FOB SALE 



WIGGIN'S FARM 

APPLY T O THB CHADWICK TBIO. 

STUART BARNES 



JAMBS B. PLUNKBTT, 



HOMER B. IW HAJMUmiTC 

AsoNg Heeler 



Direction, Max Hart. Putnam Bldg., N. T. C. 

3 MUSKETEERS 3 







(Dunbam) (Edwards) (Farrell) 

Mr. Manager and Booking Agent: We are 
at liberty week of Nov. 1* and later. We 
will play for anyone who pay* us oar salary. 
Address Direct. Oct. 14, 15. 16. Globe Theatre. 
Boston. Mass; Oct. 17. 18. IB, Colonial, 
Haverhill, Mass. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

JOHN T. MURRAY 

THE SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD 

ARE: 

ME 

I 

MYSELF 

MY ACT 

MY GENIUS 

GENE HUGHES 

AND 

JOHN T. MURRAY 



BILLY DAMA 

HALLIGAN «• SYKES 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Shnbert, Utlea. N. Y. 
Direction, W. 8. Henneesy. 




MASON 



FRANK 



DU TIEL 



New Orleans. "Pleu.viine" — Kthi-1 Mason Is 
s;ild to l>e the original jil.uio ;ucr>r<ilonlBt. She* 
known how tn play tin- inntninunt In top- 
notch fashion. Frank Dill n 1 ili.ss<s u> 11 and 
s|ii|?s well I'tuiugh to 1m lit ailed several 
lino's. The tram works well. 

New Orleans "Dully States" —Ethel Mason 
i ii >1 l-'r ink Hut id hiive a decidedly danny 
Mini! and dance numher. 

Direction. FLOYD W. HTOKKK. 




George 
Ha r a da 



World Famous Cyclist 

313 W. 40th St., 
New York 



SOPHIE 



MYRTLE 



FRANKS SISTERS 



ALWAYS WORKING 



CHARLES AHEARM 




'THE SPEBD KING 



PAT CABBY, Agent. 



B-A-H-J-O-P-H-I-E-N-D-S 

Nest Week (Oct. 14), Colombia, Grand Baplda 

Naples la the cham- 
pion "Busking" place 
of the world; you 
never lose them. Even 
In the ruins of Pom- 
pell. It was In Pom- 
pell we saw a "What 
What" 1800 years old. 
Petrified- They are 
excavating every day 
In hopes of discover- 
ing others. 

We loaded up on 
spaghetti two yards 
long. 

Did a five-minute turn in the 2,000-year- 
old theatre, and still Vesuvius smoked on. 
Marseilles, Paris, etc.. nert week. 

Bpaghettlly yours, 

VARDON, PERRY A WILBER 




DALLAS ROMANS 

"THAT TEXAS GIRL" 

Touring W. T. M. A. Time. 
Direction, MYSELF. 



»IE ONLY EDUCATED TALKING FISH 
IS WORKING WITH 

Jack E. Magee 



AND 



Frances Kerry 

FOR THE W. V. A. 

THE FIRST ACT TO EVER USE 
CRUTCHES ON THE STAGE. 





This is 












.mV^RHRB 






..ml 1 Bbv 


















i ' "imr' 






HATTIE COLEY 




of 

FAY 2 COLEYS AND FAY 



JIM TEN BROOKE TRIO 

Amusing In their own original way. 
Direction AKTIlt K J. IIOKWITZ. 



Marcus - Gartelle 



m their 

"Skatorial Rollerism" 

JAMES PLENBBTT, 




GAVIN as. PL ATT 
th. PEACHES 

BOOKED ON U. B, D. 
1BJ14I Pmsssi 7 Iswwerae its.. CMtsa. I. J. 



BERT MELROSE 

Paatarins tha "MCLROSR PALL" 



"THE 

LEAP YEAR 

GIRLS" 

A comedy satire. Kent the Sunday 
audience at the Empress In tears all the 
while. Laughter being so close to weep- 
ing anyhow. From a little Incipient rip- 
ple to a great, sweeping gale of "hah-ha 
has/' Is the cycle.— San Francisco "News." 

Address, Fred'k Wallace, per route. 



Ida Merrill and Fraik Qtti 

Next Week (Oct. IS), Orpheum, Omaha. 
Direction MAX HART. 

"I SHOULD WORRY" 

HONO FONO 

Opening Engagements In Europe, June, 1913. 
Character Singer and Dance 



THE 



4 HARMONY 
BOYS 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Cosmo*, 

Washington, D. C. 

Oct. 24-27, Linden, Chicago. 

Direction JAMES B. McKOWEN. 



CHRIS O. BROWN 



PRESENTS 



FRANCES CLARE 

AND HEB 

8 LITTLE GIRL FRIENDS 

IN "MARY'S PARTY" 

with GUY RAWSON 



ALL BOOKED 



m .' 



BARRY»W0LF0RD 



"AT TBTB BOHR 
Booked Solid on Orp h eu m 

JAM. E. PLUNKBTT, Smart Mar. 
Perm. Add., Casino and Roosevelt Ave*., 

Freeport, L. I. 
Nest We ek (Oct. 14), Orpheum, New Orleans 

ALFREDO 

BOOKED SOLID. 
Nest Week (Pet. 14), Utlca, N. Y. 

Wllllard Slmms 



ted Solid 
Dtrecttea, LOUIS WESLEY 



Rube DicklnsoR 

Next Week (Oct. 14), Hammeratein's, N. Y. 




Williams 



and 



Sterling 

Next Week (Oct. 14), 
Princess, Hot Springs 



MYRTLE IRENE 

VICTORINE and ZOLAR 

Playing United Time, 

Direction, JKNTE JACOBS. 

MAX OBACB 

Ritter-Foster 

TRIO 

with "The Gay Widows." 
Address care VARIETY, New York. 



AND 









A LAUGH A SECOND 



THE ELECTRIC WIZARD 



HERMAN 

PLAYING W. V. M. A. TIME 
Agent, PAT CASEY 



PRIMO 



JUGOLER 

BOOKED SOLID 

United Time. 



THE AMERICAN 



COOKE 

AND 



3 Rotherts 




Top or bottom of every bill in the past 4 
months in England. 




TAN E AN and CLAXTON 



ALWAYS WORKING 



PACIFIC STRUT, BROOKLYN 




When answering adwrtiiemcnta kindly mention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



LONE 

HANSON 



The Premiere Character Comedienne 
MANAGERS:— HERE'S WHAT YOU WANTED COME— SEE— BE CONVINCED 

Originally Engaged for Three Days at the American, Held Over for the Full Week (Oct. 7) 

Musical Director, RAI—f^M I— - 



MARK 



Notice to Eastern Managers 



Will arrive In New York October 10th 
Direct from England p^ R^g ^^ Q Q> 



M 



and will present 

In " 

With CHARLES CHAPLIN as "Archibald 



" 



SOULE 

MAKE 



This Company will have in Repertoire, and can present 
any or all of the established standard acts 

"A NIGHT IN AN ENGLISH MUSIC HALL" 
"A NIGHT IN A LONDON CLUB"— "SLUMS 

OF LONDON/' etc. 

OPEN ON THE S.-C. CIRCUIT (Empress, Cincinnati) October 20th with 

"WOW-WOWS," or a "NIGHT IN A LONDON SECRET SOCIETY" 



SOULE GREASE PAINT FleahColors.10c.Each 

In Whit* Black. Now t Fleeh. No. i Bom Tint. No. T Sunburn. No. 11 Ruddy Old A*s, 
No. 14 Spaniard. No. It Oriental, only. Stick* are S inches Ions and 1 Inch In 
diameter. Smooth, aoft and easily applied. NEW PRODUCT. 



SOULE STAGE POWDER 



25c. Each 



Can offer for big Eastern time many Standard KARNO acts as at present 
playing and headlining at all leading London and Provincial Theatres in Eng- 
land, with full Companies of Competent Performers and Special Scenes and 
Effects. 

"The Hydro"— "Dandy Thieves"— "Moses & Sons" 

"Country Sports"— "The Bailiff"— "The G. P. O." 

"The Football Match"— "Perkins." etc., etc. 

Address communications care SAM COHEN, 321W. 43d St., or VARIETY, New York 



all Producliois Copyrighted. 

F. RECV 



Attorneys, HOUSE. GIOSSMAN & V0IHAUS 
will be in New York all week (Oct. 14) 



in tt-lb. Cans. Screw Corer (The Orooa Can). No. 1 Llfht Pink. No. t Medium Pick. 
No. S Brunette. No. 4 Deep Pink. No. II Oriental, and White. The boat Low-Prioed 
Stage Powder on the market. NEW PRODUCT. 

SOULE COLD CREAM 

In tt-Ib. Cans, Screw Corer 25c. MCtl 

In 1-lb. Cans. Screw Corer 50C. OBCll 

This la an old standard Cold Cream, mad* for orer a quarter of a century, and loads 

no introduction to the older ones In the profession. 

The HESS Company 






ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



SOLE OWNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

Sold by all Leading Druggists. Coatumera and Hair Dealers through the 
United States and Canada, at the above prices. 



The Great Tornados 

THE FASTEST ACROBATS IN THE WORLD 

Booked Solid until end of May, 1013. On Keith and Orpheum Circuits 



i 



This Week (Oct. 7) ORPHEUM. Brooklyn 
Next Week (Oct. 14) ALHAMBRA, New York 
Week Oct. 21. BUSHWICK, Brooklyn 



The twirling "Tornados" come on the stage last; their title's a 
good one, for truly they're fast. For feats acrobatic they've snap 
and they've "go." It's surely a corking big vaudeville show. 

New York "Journal" 



All Communications PAUL TAUSIG, PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK 



When anttotring adverii$emert» kindly mei.tion VARIETY. 



VARIETY 
























CATCH ME 












:{ 



• 



FIFTH AVENUE THEATRE, NEW YORK CITY 



NEXT WEEK (Oct. 14) 



. 






ROVER 



BATES 



EMERSON 



REED 



SWEETEST SINGING QUARTET 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Playing Keith's, Boston, this week (Oct. 7) 
for the third time in eleven months 



Direction ALBEE, WEBER & EVANS 



a Jwrtt tti— n JMntfly mention YAB1ETY. 



TEN CENTS 




VARIETY 



A REGULAR "GIRL ACT 



*f 






MR. CHRIS O. BROWN 






■ Hi ■•'• 









PRESENTS 












"The Darling of Vaudeville 



» 



FRANCES CLARE 



And Her Eight Little Girl Friends 



WITH 



• 



GUY RAWSON 



in "JUST KIDS" 



, i 



Staged by MR. JACK MASON 



Music by MARSHALL and MURPHY 



Costumes by BLOODGOOD 



Next Week (Oct. 21), Nixon Theatre, Philadelphia 

THEN OFF FOR THE COAST OVER THE SULLIVAN-CONSIDINE TOUR 

SEASON ALL BOOKED 



When anawering adverti$emcnt$ kindly mention VARIETY 




Vol. XXVIII. No. 7. 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1912. 



PRICE 10 CENTS. 






FRISCO MANAGERS ORGANIZE : 

EXPECT LABOR TROUBLES 






Theatrical Property Representing $20,000,000 in Allied 

Theatre Managers 9 Association. All San Francisco 

Houses Included. Musicians and Operators 

Making Demands Brought Organization 

About. Others Forming on Coast. 



San Francisco, Oct. 16. 

A temporary organization of the 

managers of all the theatres in this 

city was effected at a meeting held 
last week. 

This is the first time in the history 

of local theatricals that an organization 
of all the amusement interests has been 
iffccted. 

The prime object of the organization 
is declared to be the general protec- 
tion of the interests of the members, 
both individually and collectively. The 
heads of every theatre of any note in 
the city have subscribed their signa- 
tures to the membership roll. 

While the organization meetings 
were inclined to be a sort of sub rosa 
affair, it is pretty generally known that 
the movement was brought about by 
what is considered unreasonable de- 
mands on the part of labor unions. 

It is claimed that the musicians, op- 
erators and stage hands have been 
running things just about to suit them- 
selves here, and organized labor is 
so strong numerically that the aver- 
age theatre owner or manager has 
heretofore been afraid to interpose a 
strenuous objection, much less a point 
blank Tefusal to accede to the union's 
demands. 

The name of the organization is the 
Allied Theatre Managers' Association. 
It is claimed to be one of the largest, 
if not the largest, organization of its 
kind outside of New York City and 
Chicago, and represents theatrical in- 
terests to the extent of $20,000,000 in- 
vested capital. 

The following were appointed mem- 
bers of a committee to draft rules and 
by-laws to be submitted at the perma- 
nent organization meeting: Homer F. 
Curran, Melville Marx, William H. 



Leahy, Ralph Pincus, D. J. Grauman, 
Charles Cole, Charles Muehlman and 
Sam Harris. 

It is expected that tomorrow will 
see the completion of the drafting of 
a set of by-laws for the Allied Theatre 
Managers' Association. Once the al- 
liance is placed on a permanent foot- 
ing it is planned to call a joint confer- 
ence Oct. 21, at which will be repre- 
sented the theatre managers, moving 
picture exhibitors and the labor coun- 
cil. 

The object is to attempt a settle- 
ment of a dispute between the man- 
agers and the picture machine oper- 
ators. There are rumors of a threat- 
ened strike. The operators declare 
they will walk out if their demands 
are turned down. On the other hand, 
the theatre managers appear to be 
much inclined to accept the issue and 
let the disagreement form the basis of 
an out-and-out fight. 

The managers have been holding un- 
official meetings here and it is believed 
that they are preparing for a general 
tying up of the labor situation through 
the sympathetic lockout of the musi- 
cians and stage hands. The managers 
claim to represent property and enter- 
prises capitalized at $20,000,000. 

It is reported that eleven associa- 
tions of managers were formed on the 
Pacific Slope within the last ten days, 
all being affiliated with the central 
body in San Francisco. Oakland and 
Sacramento are known to have formed 
alliances. 

The managers declare that the 
unionists never asked for a conference 
until now. The workmen have invari- 
ably fixed their own wage scale and 
then served notice of an increase on 
the managers. 



NEW BIO PRODUCTION. 

There is said to be under way by 

the Shuberts a big new production, in 

which Gaby Deslys and Al Jolson 

will be featured. The show will be 
ready about New Year's. Until then, 
Gaby will go out with "Vera Violetta" 
and Jolson remain with "The Social 
Whirl." 



RATS THEATRE IN ARREARS. 



NANCE 0*NEIL*S SKETCH OFF. 

Nance O'Neil, who is breaking in 

her "Joan of Arc" sketch at Union Hill 

this week, was to have opened Monday 
at the Orpheum, Brooklyn. The sketch 
was not deemed good enough and will 
be shelved Sunday. A new one goes 
in rehearsal as quickly as possible. 

Her place on the Orpheum program 
will be taken by Ray Cox as headliner. 



TAKES ON NIAGARA FALLS. 

Buffalo, Oct. 16. 
Commencing Nov. 25 the United 
Booking Offices will place two-a-day 
vaudeville in the International theatre 
at Niagara Falls. * 



DE HAVEN AS "THE PET." 

A. H. Woods has settled upon his 
next, and final production of this sea- 
son. At least Mr. Woods has decided 
"The Pet of the Petticoats'* will be his 
last show for 12-13. 

To assume the title role of "The 
Pet" show, Mr. Woods has selected 
Carter De Haven, now with the 
"Hanky Panky" at the Broadway. The 
production will be set going within a 
month or so. 



MOROSCO BUYS OUT BLACKWOOD 

Los Angeles, Oct. 16. 

Oliver Morosco has purchased John 
Blackwood's interest in the Morosco- 
Blackwood Co. He now has control 
of that enterprise. The whole prop- 
erty now stands in Morosco's name 
with the exception of a block of stock 
belonging to Capt. A. C. Jones. 

Blackwood remains in charge of the 
publicity department of Morosco's en 
terprises. 



"WOMAN HATER'S" DOES $8,00<>. 

For its first week at the Astor. A. H. 
Woods' "Woman Hater's Club" did 
$8,000. 



The White Rats theatre at Lancas- 
ter, Pa., is in arrears on salary. The 

house is called the Family. Howard 
E. Doane is the manager. 

After the week of Sept. 23 had pass- 
ed away, Rutan's Song Birds, an act on 
the Family's program, found it could 
not collect all salary due; $81 was 
short. Rutan accepted a promise to 
pay and traveled along. 

The M. R. Sheedy Circuit, which 
was booking the theatre, had an un- 
paid bill of $150 for commissions, also- 
past due. Failure to liquidate by the 
theatre management caused the Sheedy 
office to discontinue service. Last Fri- 
day James Sheedy went over to Lan- 
caster. Not noticing anything tangi- 
ble around the place, Jim agreed to ac- 
cept the day's receipts on account. 
They amounted to $50. 

After the Sheedy office stopped serv- 
ing the Family, the Prudential agency 
took up the matter of supplying bills. 
At last accounts the Prudential was 
still at it. 

Actors failing to receive settlement 
in full at the Lancaster Family are 
quoted as believing the White Rats 
will make good claims against the the- 
atre. The Rats is said to have leased 
the house to Doane. It was secured 
by the Rats when that organization of 
vaudeville artists became interested 
with Edward Mozart in the Mozart 
Circuit. 



CANCELED ACT GETS ROUTE. 

A full route over the Sullivan-Con- 
sidine and Loew Circuits has been giv- 
en Neil McKinley. Mr. McKinley com- 
mences to play the time in New York. 
He started this week. 

A couple of weeks ago McKinley was 
canceled by the United Booking Offices 
through having appeared at the Nixon 
theatre. Philadelphia. Immediately 
Chris Hrown and Joe Schenck, for the 
S-C and Loew Circuits, gave him con- 
tracts for the season. 



.\DE\S COLLEGE HOY PIECE. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

<j ^r^e Ade is writing the piece to be 
presented in the spring by the Purdue 
Harlequin Club of Lafayette, Ind. 

The college boys first presented 
Ade's "Fair Co-Ed." 



VARIETY 



WHY AMERICAN PIECES 

FAIL TO ATTRAC T IN LONDON 

English Attitude Conservative, Not Prejudiced. Too 
Much Booming and Little Discrimination in Selec- 
tion of Material. "Ready Money" One 
of London's Biggest Hits 



ELLEN KISSED SARAH. 

London, Oct. 16. 

Ellen Terry appeared at the Colis- 
eum Monday evening with Sarah 
Bernhardt as a personal tribute to the 
French artist. 

Handing her a huge floral piece 
Miss Terry called her "Queen Sarah" 
and the two actresses kissed. It was 
a most impressive scene. 



London, Oct. 16. 

American managers are" viewing with 
dismay the reception accorded their 
productions here this season and are 
attributing their general lack of suc- 
cess to English prejudice. 

Such is not the case, however. The 
English attitude toward American pro- 
ductions is one of conservatism and 
not prejudice. The fact is, English 
and American tastes differ. American 
plays to the number of ten arrived 
at the wrong time of year, as wit- 
ness "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" 
in the midst of the "Bunty" boom. 
Some arrive when the London public 
is hungry for novelties and are then 
successful. 

Subjects and locale are the great 
problems of international exchange of 
hits. There are psychological and 
geographical reasons for many failures 
t>f American successes here. "Find the 
Woman" has played here over one 
hundred nights and is sufficiently mel- 
odramatic, yet moderate in treatment. 
"The Pink Lady" had too much chorus 
and not enough legitimate story. There 
'is a tendency here now to appreciate 
high-class farce with music. "Every- 
woman" was considered too preachy 
and poorly written. "The Great John 
Ganton" was regarded as not a first- 
class show and the subject a trifle 
foreign, hence not altogether under- 
stood. Then the Aldwych theatre is 
under a cloud and not a good place 
for new productions. 

American plays are generally over- 
boomed here before opening. As a 
matter of fact, the percentage of Eng- 
lish failures in London is greater than 
those of American productions, but 
this may be accounted for by the fact 
that only the successes of America are 
sent here. "Ready Money" at this 
moment is one of the biggest hits of 
the season. 

Generally, American managers err 
in displaying too little discrimination 
in their selection of material for Eng- 
land. Most of the American vaude- 
ville folks adapt themselves sooner or 
later to English requirements, which 
provides a strong object lesson to the 
legitimate producers. 

"Officer 666" will succeed "Rebecca 
of Sunnybrook Farm" at the Globe. 
"Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford" is re- 
ported soon to be produced over here. 



LONERCiAX (JOES BICJ. 

London, Oct. 16. 
Lester Loncr^an and Co. in "A to Z," 
at the Palladium, went very big. 



HAG SINGER FAILS. 

London, Oct. 16. 
The Alhambra Revue, opening Mon 
day night, is largely of American 
flavor and is an amusing illustration 
of the police methods prevailing in 
New York and London, political lam- 



pooning, a travesty on "Rebecca if 
Sunnybrook Farm" and a Cabaret fin- 
ish. 

Muriel Hudson in a rag song failed; 
Alfred's dancing, passable; chorus and 
ballet excellent; shadowgraph and 
cinematograph employed. Others in 
cast are MacArdle, Mame Buck and 
Picks. 

The Revue needs condensing. 



ROYAL FAVOR FOR "DOORMATS." 

London, Oct. 16. 
The King and Queen visited Wynd- 
bam's theatre to witness a perform- 
ance of "Doormats," indicating their 
approval of the show. 



TRIPLE BILL MILD. 

London, Oct. 16. 

The triple bill at the Duke of York's 
theatre, comprising three one-act plays 
by Bernard Shaw, Arthur W. Pinero 
and J. M. Barrie, will not create any 
sensation. 

Shaw's offering is disappointing, 
Pinero's indifferent, and Barrie's, excel- 
lent. 

Pinero's sketch met with a mixed re- 
ception. Shaw's received some laughs, 
but not many. 



ENGAGES WRITER ON CONTRACT. 

London, Oct. 16. 
C. H. Bovell, who collaborates with 
George R. Sims for the next Drury 
Lane pantomime, has been engaged by 
the Empire management for three 
years. 



DRESS SUIT GERMAN PLAY. 

Berlin, Oct. 16. 

The Deutsche Schauspielhaus has z. 
good comedy in "Der Gutzitzen de 
Frack." The plot is around a tailor 
who, by appropriating a dress suit, 
dupes a number of high officials. 

The idea is excellently worked out. 



GENE GREENE A HIT. 

London, Oct. 16. 

Gene Greene did not arrive in time 
to open at the Palace Monday, owing 
to the late arrival of the steamer from 
America. He went on Tuesday even- 
ing and is a big hit. 

His best numbers are "Married" and 
"Piano Man." He may change his 
other songs for more suitable ones. 



IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL. 

. London, Oct. 16. 
At Frank Bostock's funeral there- 
was a cortege half a mile long, with 
five loads of flowers, many of the 
pieces shaped as animals. 



"MONTE CRI8TO" TOO LONG. 

London, Oct. 16. 
The revival of "Monte Cristo" at the 
Prince's theatre, running nearly four 
hours, will be successful if condensed. 




PROFITABLE SHOW BUSINESS. 

London, Oct. 16. 

Edmund Gwenn and Hilda Trevely- 
an were backed for $50,000 for their 
production of "Little Miss Llewellyn" 
at the Vaudeville theatre. 

The syndicate which put up the cash 
is already taking down profits, with 
the original investment scarcely 
touched. 



HYMAN BACK IN LONDON. 

London, Oct. 16. 
Sydney Hyman returns to London 
Oct. 26, coming from South Africa. 
May De Sousa opens in the Hyman 
South African theatres Nov. 3, book- 
ed by the Marinelli agency. 



PALLADIUM XMAS POLICY. 

London, Oct. 16. 
The Palladium will have a mam- 
moth minstrel show during the Christ- 
mas holidays with "The Brass Bot- 
tle" at matinees. Charles Gulliver will 
offer the regular theatrical show at the 
matinees with the minstrel entertain- 
ment only at night performances. 



REACHES lOOTH PERFORMANCE. 

London, Oct. 16. 
"Hindlc Wakes" has reached it:. 
hundredth performance, and is going 
along to good business. 



TRAVESTYING PICTURES. 

London, Oct. 16. 
The Lifeograph, a travesty on the 
Cinematograph, at St. George's Hall, 
introduces an ingenious scene, with the 
changes done by means of light 
switches and transparencies. 



ENGLISH MELLER TITLE. 

London, Oct. 9. 

"The Man Tempted Me," a new melo- 
drama by F. Marriott-Watson, under 
the direction of the author and James 
Usher, is playing in the provinces. 

The temptation runs through four 
acts. In the first, "The Tempter Ap- 
pears"; second, "The Villains Ply Their 
Trade"; third, "The Man Does the 
Tempting," and the fourth act is billed 
"Dishonored but Pure." 

Another melodrama shortly to be 
produced over here will be called 
"Soiled, Yet Sinless." 



OUT IX SHAKESPfcRIAN REP. 

Nov. 1, at Richmond, Ya.. a Shakes- 
perian repertoire company, carrying 
four of the classics, will open. 

The principals arc to be Charles 
Hanford, R. D. MacLean and Odette 
Tyler. Mr. Hanford is putting out the 
company. 



JOSIE COLLINS WON'T PAY. 

Josie Collins won't pay H. B. Mari- 
nelli his commission. The Marinelli 
agency lias sued the songstress with 
"The Merry Countess" for a partial 
amount due. It recovered judgment 
for $350. Miss Collins has neglected 
to settle that also, which obliged Ar- 
thur Fullman. attorney for the agency. 
to issue an order for the examination 
<><" the actress in supplementary pro- 
C( c<li:i: «i '.)-,]., week. 

LOOK FOR 



MR. FRED IRELAND and MISS NEMA CATTO 

With Fr.-d Tivlnnd mid His Caalno Girls Direction Bechler Bros. 



— Advertlseinen t 



VARIETY 



CABARETS BECOMING GENERAL; 
WALDO RF-AST ORIA IN LINE 

High Class New York Hotels Putting in "Entertainers." 

Breslin and Grand Figuring on a "Supper Show." 

Martinique Starts With $1,200 Program. 

Churchill's Big Offer to Elizabeth Murray. 



The New York first-class hotels are 
going after the Cabaret thing. This 
week the Waldorf-Astoria, Breslin and 
Grand were figuring upon putting in a 
"supper show" for their guests. 

The Waldorf wants only singers, who 
may warble classical airs or a ballad. 
The other hotels have not yet indi- 
cated what line of entertainment will 
best please their patrons. 

Monday the Martinique commenced 
a Cabaret bill of eight acts that will 
cost the hostelry $1,200 for the week. 
It is headed by the Five Musikgirls, 
a turn that has appeared on vaudeville's 
big time. The Musikgirls receive $300 
for the week's engagement. 

The inroads into the restaurants of 
the big hotels, after the theatre and 
during the dinner hour, made by the 
large restaurants along Broadway, have 
forced the hotel men, it is said, to 
take cognizance of the cause, which 
they ascribe to the Cabaret entertain- 
ment. 

The Martinique program is furnished 
by the Cabaret department of the 
United Booking Offices. 

The restaurant Cabarets are out after 
big vaudeville acts. The United Book- 
ing Offices Cabaret Department has 
attempted to induce several of the 
bonl faces to place bookings in its of- 
fices, but the Cabaret managers look 
upon the United as against their best 
interest. It is said the U. B. O. wants 
to tie up the Cabaret shows in order 
that it may dictate the bookings for 
the restaurants, which would preclude 
the feederies from engaging the best 
turns. 

Churchill's is one of the Cabarets 
declining the United offer, probably 
for this reason. Captain Churchill un- 
derstands the show portion of his 
business. 

This week Churchill's made an offer 
to Elizabeth Murray to headline at 
its restaurant show. The Captain of- 
fered Miss Murray a "play or pay" 
contract for ten weeks at the largest 
salary ever paid a Cabaret entertainer. 
She is inclined to accept the tender. 
■ having had the usual annoyances in 
attempting to secure engagements 
through the U. B. O. for regular vau 
deville. Following an enormous hit 
in. 'Madame Sherry" w . at the Am- 
sterdam, New York, Miss Murray 
found the U. B. O. "stalling" tactics 
very aggravating. If she accepts the 
Churchill contract, it will be another 
instance of a big feature act believing 
it a duty to play where time and sal- 
ary are forthcoming, and to set an ex- 
ample which other oppressed artists 
will follow. 



nouncing Bard in an underline on the 
programs. 

The question of playing Sunday is 
holding up the confirmation of the 
agreements. If Bard does come over, 
his place of initial appearance has beci 
set for Philadelphia, Dec. 23, with New 
York to follow, though this may be 
changed. The Philadelphia opening was 
selected as a convenience to the Keith 
theatre over there. 



PALACE BREAKS RECORD. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

From the mid-week figures it is ap- 
parent the Palace with vaudeville pol- 
icy is going to establish a new record 
by Saturday. At 1 o'clock Wednesday 
the box office had taken in $214 more 
than its best previous total for the 
same time. 

Last week the house brought in a 
little less than $11,000, the biggest 
gross in its career. This is the estab- 
lishment that everybody said could not 
be made to pay with vaudeville. 

What strikes Chicago as a very fine 
vaudeville bill is the show announced 
for next week at the Palace. How the 
program may be run will have con- 
siderable to do with the result. It is 
"Eternal Waltz," Clark and Hamilton, 
Lester, Sherman, Van & Hyman, Win- 
slow and Stryker, Harry Breen, Klu- 
ting's Animals. 

"The Eternal Waltz" will likely close 
the performance. 



LEFT BILL MONDAY. 

Chicago, Oct. 26. 

Josie Rooney withdrew from the bill 
at the Palace Monday after playing two 
performances. A slight difference arose 
between the artiste and the management 
as to some alleged suggestiveness in her 
routine which could not be eliminated 
without injuring the act. 

Tuesday afternoon Custis' Roosters 
were sent in as substitute. 



BARD NOT YET SETTLED. 

The contracts for Wilkie Bard's ap- 
pearance over here are not yet settled, 
despite the B. F. Keith houses are an- 



FITZSIMMON'S ROAD SHOW. 

Oyster Bay, L. I., Oct. 16. 

Bob Fitzsimmons and Co., with May- 
belle Byrnes, formerly of "The Merry 
Widow" Co., opened a road tour here 
to a packed house Monday night. In 
addition to a minstrel first part, a play- 
let, "The Prima Donna's Idol," by Ar- 
thur J. Lamb, was presented. Special- 
ties were offered by the McDonalds 
and the Macks. 

The show is booked through "the 
Syndicate" houses in the middle east 
Fitzsimmons expects to play in New 
York three weeks in December. Wal 
ter S. Caldwell, formerly treasurer of 
the Colonial, New York, is managing 
the company. 

GUESS! !! 



KEITH BOOKS BELASCO ACT. 

"The Drums of Oude" will appear 
in New York Nov. 25, at the Colonial. 
It is one of the David Belasco vaude- 
ville productions, built for the Orpheum 
Circuit, where it has been playing for 
nearly twenty weeks. 

The B. F. Keith houses will play 
Mr. Belasco $2,500 weekly for the 
sketch. That is understood to be a 
larger amount than the legitimate man- 
ager gave the turn to Martin Beck for. 
About twelve weeks have been secured 
for the act by the United Booking 
Offices, Belasco refusing to permit it 
to play in the east unless ten weeks 
or more were contracted for. 

The "Mme. Butterfly" sketch of Be- 
lasco has been disbanded, after playing 
out its allotted time over the Orpheum 
Circuit. The "Drums" piece will close 
the western time at Kansas City just 
before opening in New York. 



FOREIGN SOPRANO'S DEBUT. 

St. Louis, Oct. 16. 

Next week at the Columbia Marie 
Galvany, a foreign operatic soprano, 
will headline the vaudeville program. 
It will be her first appearance on this 
side. 

The singer was engaged by Martin 
Beck, of the Orpheum Circuit, which 
books the Columbia. It is said Galvany 
receives around $1,000 weekly. 



STOP "RESURRECTION" FILM. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
The Blanche Walsh feature film, "The 
Resurrection," was ordered closed by 
the San Francisco board of censors af- 
ter it had been permitted to run near- 
ly a week at the Republic. 



MARIE EMPRESS* ACT. 

Marie Empress is about to reappear 
in a new and elaborate act, staged 
by Jack Mason.. There will be three 
people and a piano in the turn. Miss 
Empress is said to have gone at the 
vaudeville subject more seriously than 
'before, when she placed too much de- 
pendence upon the large quantity of 
publicity received by her. 



ROLFE FEATURING PUSEY. 

The new vaudeville number to bi 
produced by B. A. Rolfe in December 
'will feature Chas. A. Pusey. 

Mr. Pusey is at present in Rolfe'? 
"Puss in Boots," at the Fifth Avenue 
next week, for its first New York ap- 
pearance. 



— Advertisement 



JEN IE JACOBS— A DANCER. 

As penalty for becoming a "rag time" 
dancer for one evening only, Jenie 
Jacobs suffered a sprained ankle Sun- 
day. 

At her home, 67 West 44th *Uccl, 
Miss Jacobs, to a raggy tune on the 
phonograph, started to illustrate to 
her guests how the "Texas Tommy" 
should be put over. Miss Jacobs 
danced a few steps, when she claimed 
the audience wasn't paying attention. 

A sort of high kick, Jenie said, had 
gone over their heads. She would re- 
peat the effort, and with the phono- 
graph all wound up afresh, the agentess 
aimed her right foot for the chande- 
lier. 

It may be Monday before the staff 
of the Pat Casey Agency will hear 
from Miss Jacobs' own lips how it 
happened. 



GOT PAST EDITOR. 

John Ringling threatens to bring a 
libel suit against one of the New York 
theatrical papers. The publication an- 
nounced solemnly a week or two ago 
that the circus man had married a 
western society girl in one of ihe low- 
er California towns. The names and 
various other details were set forth. 

John Ringling has been married for 
twenty years. Mrs. Ringling lives in 
the couple's Fifth avenue home. Nat- 
urally Mr. Ringling took the wedding 
announcement in a trade paper as in- 
excusable and now proposes to appeal 
to the courts. 



LOFTUS DATE POSTPONED. 

The opening of Cecilia Loftus at the 
Colonial, set originally for Oct. 21, has 
been postponed until some time next 
month. It is announced Miss Loftus 
requested more time to prepare the 
studies for her turn. 



"NO GREAT" IN BILLING. 

Orders have gore forth from the 
Orpheum Circuit headquarters that the 
word "Great" prefixed to the name of 
an act shall not appear in the billing 
matter for an Orpheum theatre. 

A couple of acts now traveling the 
Orpheum time, and which were wont to 
favor "Great" as descriptive of them- 
selves, have had their titles narrowed 
down to one word. 



SMALLER KELLERMANN SHOW. 

The Annette Kellermann Road Show 
under the management of William 
Morris left Washington last Saturday 
for a week of one-nighters in Penn- 
sylvania, with some of the acts form- 
ing the original company out of the 
performance. 

The show as it appeared at the Grand 
Opera House, Wilkesbarre, Monday, 
was composed of Miss Kellermann, 
"The Rose of Mexico," Rex, and the 
Basque Quartet. Miss Kellermann took 
part in the Mexican pantomime, which 
also contained a couple of specialties. 

Harry Tate's "Motoring" left after 
the Washington engagement, claiming 
the management ordered that all acts 
pay their own transportation over the 
night stands. 



"ANTIQUE GIRL** LOSES STARS. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 16. 

Fletcher Norton and Maud Earl, the 
stars of "The Antique Girl," leave 
the act here. They will do two acts 
in vaudeville, opening Nov. 11 under 
the management of Max Hart. 

Mr. Norton gives as the cause of 
their departure that "The Antique 
Girl" has been a failure over the Or- 
pheum Circuit, besides expressing 
himself as dissatisfied with the man- 
agement of Jesse L. Lasky, who owns 
the sketch. 



18 FARES SHY. 

Terre Haute, Oct. 16. 

The Inter-State Carnival Company, 
which did poor business at Brazil last 
week, was held here Sunday night pend- 
ing investigation by a railway company. 

The show was en route to Jackson, 
Miss., with fiirly-threc people, but only 
had transportation arranged for twen- 
ty-five. The train was sidetracked until 
the manager made «ood for the other 
eighteen people. 



VAfciBTY 



4= 



ATTORNEY GEN'L SETS DATE 
FOR DI SSOLUTI ON HEARING 

Names Oct. 22 for Motion to Dissolve United Booking 

Offices and Vaudeville Collection Agency. Agents 

and Managers To Be Subpoenaed 



The attorney general of New York 
has set Oct. 22 as the date to hear 
the motion made by August Dreyer 
upon behalf of Jack Levy to dissolve 
the United Booking Offices and Vau- 
deville Collection Agency under the 
General Business Law. The hearing 
will take place at the attorney gener- 
al's office, 299 Broadway, New York. 

It is said Mr. Dreyer intends sub- 
poenaing a number of vaudeville man- 
agers and agents to furnish testimony 
regarding the two agencies. 

The line of action to be pursued will 
not be divulged by the lawyer. Ac- 
cording to report, he expects to prove 
by testimony collusion between the 
U. B. O. and the collection agency. 

The application for the hearing is 
an important side issue of the suit 
brought by Mr. Levy to recover the 
monies alleged to have been unlaw- 
fully withheld by the Vaudeville Col- 
lection Agency from him, while book- 
ing acts through the United Offices. 

Mr. Dreyer is an attorney who has 
devoted much of his professional time 
to theatricals. He is well informed on 
nside" of vaudeville. 



ORCHESTRA WALKS OUT AND IN. 

The orchestra at the Colonial walked 
out Monday morning. It walked in 
again for the afternoon show. 

The walk-out came through the lead- 
er for Ada Reeve. He is Arthur Work- 
man, an Englishman, unaffiliated with 
the American Federation of Musicians. 
The union labor matter was patched up 
for the week by the Colonial men, un- 
der the leadership of Julius Lenzberg, 
consenting to play under Mr. Work- 
man for this week, granting him that 
length of time to make an American 
labor connection. 

Yesterday Mr. Lenzberg went to the 
hospital for an operation upon his 
nose. 



COMIC CARTOONIST IN LONDON. 

The first American comic cartoonist 
to try out London as a vaudeville act 
will be Hershfield, who created "Des- 
perate Desmond" and "Homeless Hec- 



»» 



tor. 

The English papers generously 
copied Mr. Hershfield's "Hector" 
series under another title. Because of 
that the London Hippodrome believes 
it a good business move to have the 
originator present himself. Hershfield 
will appear at the Hip commencing 
Nov. 25 for four weeks, placed there 
l>y Leo Maase, manager of the New 
York branch of the H. B. Marinelli 
agency. 



BOOSTING UP GRAND RAPIDS. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
Al Gillingham, of the Columbia. 
Grand Rapids, has evidently decided 
to put the Michigan town on the the 
atrical map to stay. "Tink" Hum- 
phreys, who supports Gillingham with 
his attractions, has received instruc- 



tions to go the limit for headliners, 
and up to date has succeeded in book- 
ing Henry Dixey, Tom Wise, Digby 
Bell, Gene Greene, S. Miller Kent and 
"A Night in a Turkish Bath." 



DENY 'COVERING" CHARGE. 

New Orleans, Oct. 16. 

J. P. Newman, general agent of the 
Barnum-Bailey Circus, took occasion 
during his presence in New Orleans 
recently to deny the charge that the 
billing forces of the B-B outfit covered 
up any of the Two Bills paper during 
their hot contest for display in Okla- 
homa. 

Mr. Newman declared he had affi- 
davits to show that none of the Two 
Bill paper was covered, and that the 
Wild West outfit was merely "squeal- 
ing" because the Ringling billers beat 
the opposition to the best locations. 



NOS. "2" AND "3" SKETCHES. 

The Pat Casey Agency's producing 
department is putting out "No. 2" com- 
panies of "Love in the Suburbs" and 
"Light Housekeeping," sketches now 
under its direction. These are to be 
followed by "No. 3" organizations of 
the same playlets, so that the entire 
country will be covered. 



STARRING IN "TOO NEAR PARIS." 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
Knox Wilson contemplates a star- 
ring tour for A. G. Delamater in a 
French farce, called "Too Near Paris" 
in its original form, but with a 
new title. Rehearsals will begin in 
about three weeks. The piece is in 
a prologue and two acts and calls for 
six people. There are eight song num- 
bers in it. 



ROW AT EMPRESS. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
Lew Wheeler and another member 
of Sid Grauman's feature act, "Twenty 
Minutes on the Barbery Coast," came 
to a clinch in the manager's office of 
the Empress a few nights ago. The 
cause of the fight did not become 
known, but Wheeler went to the local 
hospital for repairs. He threatens a 
damage suit. 



STERX GETS JUDGMENT. 

Final judgment was recorded Oct. 
11 in the Supreme Court in favor of 
Jos. W. Stern & Co. against J. Fred 
Helf Company for $7,762.07, thereby 
closing a two year's litigation. The 
action arose out of the publication by 
Helf of "Play That Barber Shop 
Chord." 



BECK'S 8UTRO PLAYLET. 

Martin Beck is producing for vaude- 
ville a one-act play by Alfred Sutro, in 
which Minnie Dupree is to be starred. 



BASEBALL AOT& 

Hughey Jennings, of the Detroits, 
thinks if Tommy Gray would write 
him a little sketch he could spend most 
of the winter in vaudeville playing it 
Mr. Jennings is an attorney during the 
cold weather, or whenever else he 
wishes to practice. He suggested if 
the sketch writer, author and red-head, 
could start the skit off in a lawyer's 
office, gradually working it into a set- 
ting of a baseball diamond, he (Jen- 
nings) would take care of the rest. 
Tommy says he thinks Hughey can 
do it too. 

Mr. Gray's skit for Nick Altrock and 
Germany Schaeffer is completed. They 
first appear on the "big time" Oct. 28 
at Chase's, Washington. If the piece 
goes over, the couple will get all the 
American League cities. 

"Breaking the Record" is the title of 
the act Gray is writing for Rube Mar- 
quard and Blossom Seeley. With Mar- 
quard's stock away up since Monday's 
game, it is expected there will be a de- 
mand for his vaudeville services. 

Wednesday several agents journeyed 
to Boston, in the hope of securing John 
J. McGraw, manager of the Giants, for 
vaudeville. It was said Frank Bohm, 
who has McGraw under his booking di- 
rection, was authorized to offer him 
$1,500 weekly to appear in the Keith 
theatres. McGraw had placed $2,500 hs 
the wage for himself, if the Giants won 
the series, and $2,000 if they did not. 
Hammerstein's was biting at the latter 
figure, until obtaining Marquard and 
Blossom Seeley to appear there Oct. 
28, when negotiations for McGraw were 
dropped. 

The great little director of the Na- 
tional League's best has about thirty 
slides taken at practice, that he believes 
will form an act, with a lecture by him 
while they are being shown. If Mc- 
Graw signs with the U. B. O. he will 
probably first appear at Keith's, Provi- 
dence. 

Boston, Oct. 16. 
The Red Sox Quartet will again 
play vaudeville this season, opening «t 
the National, Boston. 



"GRAY OP DAWN" ON SMALL TIME 

Maud Hall Macy has abandoned h-r 
efforts to secure a route with "The 
Gray of Dawn." 

She has, however, secured through 
Edgar Allen a route over the Loew- 
Sullivan & Considine Circuits for the 
act, with Alberta Gallatin in the part 
she created. 

The sketch will carry twenty-one 
people, making it the biggest act, in 
point of numbers, ever booked on the 
three-a-day time. 



CROWDING 'FRISCO ORPHEUM. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
It is reported a new theatre is to be 
built on the site of the old Alcazar, 
opposite the Orpheum theatre. 



WATCH FOR 



— Advertisement. 



UTICA MAY CHANGE POLICY. 

Utica, N. Y., Oct. 16. 
It is reported the Shubert, playng 
vaudeville under the direction of VVil- 
mer & Vincent and booked by the 
United Booking Offices, may change 
its policy from the first-class variety 
brand within a couple of weeks or sj, 
if business does not improve. 



BAYES AND NORWORTH*8 OFFER 

Marcus Loew has had the refusal of 
the services of Baycs and Norworth for 
a week. Jack Norworth proposed to 
Loew that they play three days at the 
National, Bronx, and the remainder of 
the week at the American, New York. 
The appearance was to have been just 
prior to the opening of the Weber & 
Fields Music Hall All Star Company 
of which the couple are members. 

Loew was given the privilege of set- 
ting his own value upon the Baycs 
and Norworth act for the week. Sal- 
ary was the least of the team's desire 
in appearing on the "small time." It 
is said they felt it would be an excel- 
lent opportunity to give the public in- 
formation upon the booking ways of 
big time vaudeville. Mr. Loew did 
not accept the proffer of the act 
through not wishing to play stars from 
the Music Hall show, and perhaps not 
quite certain of what he could afford 
to pay to follow the Bayes and Nor- 
worth engagement. 

Last season Norworth and Bayes 
received in vaudeville $2,500 weekly. 
For this season they were offered $1,250 
weekly by the United Booking Officei, 
it is reported. 



SAILINGS. 

Maximo left on the Kronprinz Wil- 
helm Oct. 15; Salerno sailed on the 
Amerika Thursday. The Paul Taus- 
sig Agency arranged the transporta- 
tion. 



NEW AGENT FOR I^REE HOU8B8 

Cincinnati, Oct. 16. 
The R. J. Gomes Agency has added 
three houses to its books. They are 
the Colonial. Covington, Temple, New- 
port and Auditorium, Dayton. Each 
will play week stands. The Temple 
and the Colonial were previously book- 
ed through the Hodkins Agency. 



LOWANDE ON YEAR'S TOUR. 

Tony Lowande's Circus has left 
Buenos Aires for a tour of South 
America. It will be out for a year. 
Lowande cabled to a New York book- 
ing agent this week and offered to sign 
an American acrobatic act for that 
length of time. 




CHARLES CARTMELL 

and 

LAURA HARRIS 

The International Favorites, have returned to 
America to play 10 weeks for th** United 
Booking; Offices. Booked until 1916 Week 
Oct. 28. Hammerstein's. New York 



VARIETY 



HOW THE UNITED BLEEDS 

THE AG ENTS AND ACTORS 

Through the Vaudeville Collection Agency, Formed to 
Evade the Agency Law. $200,000 Graft Annually. 

Where Does It Go To? 



Following the passage of the amend- 
ment to the Agency Law in New York 
State two years ago, which prohibited a 
licensed agent, "directly or indirectly" 
to receive more than five per cent com- 
mission weekly upon the booking of an 
act in vaudeville, the United Booking 
Offices (which is a licensed agency un- 
der that law), through its attorney, in- 
formed all agents then booking in the 
U. B. O. to turn in their licenses to 
the License Commissioner of New York 
City. The agents were told at the same 
time by the counsel for the United 
Booking Offices that henceforth, to 
evade the provisions of the agency law, 
they must term themselves "represen- 
tatives" or "managers" of vaudeville 
acts, and deny to the commissioner his 
law-given right to supervise them or 
their theatrical operations. These in- 
structions were generally followed. 

The next point passed upon by the 
United Booking Offices was how to 
continue to hold back two and one-half 
per cent of the agent's commission 
without violating the law which pro- 
vides that a licensed agent may not re- 
ceive over five per cent commission, di- 
rectly or indirectly. The U. B. O. was 
then, and has peen since charging five 



A PLAIN EXAMPLE 

If the agent who charges five per 
cent for commission and is made to 
exist upon two and one-half per cent 
through the United Booking Offices 
"splitting" the agent's fee, why can not 
the U. B. O., with its great bulk of 
business be maintained upon a two and 
one-half per cent commission basis in- 
stead of the seven and one-half per cent 
it forces the actor to pay it? 



per cent itself upon every booking en- 
tered through its office. 

The U. B. O. through its counsel or- 
ganized a collection agency that would 
collect the commission due the agent, 
and for that service charge fifty per 
cent of the gross amount, which equaled 
one-half of the agent's five. The 
Vaudeville Collection Agency was 
incorporated, with three agents as 
the incorporators. Although organized 
to mulct the agents of their rightfully 
earned fees, agents booking through lit t- 
United were employed as "dummies." 

Previous to the passage of the 
amended Agency Law, the United was 
prepared to stand upon the ground, in 
case of legal action, that it had the 
right to deduct and retain the "split" 
from the agent for use of the booking 
offices as a "clearing house." Its claim 
on this basis was never contested. 

Upon the formation of the Vaudeville 
Collection Agency, the agents booking 
through the United were informed they 
would have to sign an agreement au- 
thorizing the Vaudeville Collection 
Agency to collect their commissions 



from acts, and render them (agents) 
weekly statements. This agreement 
was signed by all "representatives," 
they having been given to understand 
they must either do so or be debarred 
from booking acts with the U. B. O. 

For the fifty per cent charge, the Col- 
lection Agency renders the service 
merely of receiving the money weekly 
fiom house managers or treasurers of 



All the service performed by the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency is the re- 
ceipt and disbursement of monies. The 
personnel of the executive officers of 
the Collection Agency has changed 
since three agents were its incorpor- 
ators, until at the present time Maurice 
Goodman, attorney for the United 
Booking Offices, with his office in the 
main suite of that agency, is president 
of the Collection Agency. 

While the service performed by the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency is uni- 
form in all cases of agents' commission, 
the charge for collecting is not the 
same. Some of the agents booking 
through the U. B. O. were only obliged 
to give up one-fifth of their commis- 
sions or "a one per cent split" as it 
was known, making a gross twenty per 
cent charge by the Collection Agency, 



$200,000 GRAFT ANNUALLY. 

Where Does It do to? 

The Vaudeville Collection Agency, 
organized by the United Booking 
Offices, to bleed the agent and the 
actor, receives $200,000 annually for 
"collecting" the five per cent fee of the 
agent. 

The Vaudeville Collection Agency 
has one room and one bookkeeper, at 
a total expense of $2,000 a year. Who 
it getting the other $198,000? 



COMMISSIONER ROBINSON'S STATEMENT 



Asked to comment upon the allega- 
tion which has been made generally in 
the profession that the Vaudeville Col- 
lection Agency is merely a subterfuge 
to give legal color to the illegal exac- 
tion of more than a five per cent book- 
ing fee by the United Booking Offices. 
Commissioner of Licenses Herman 
Robinson said to a Variety reporter: 

"My attention has been called to the 
Vaudeville Collection Agency and its 
alleged relations to the United Book- 
ing Offices. I am interested in the sub- 
ject, and if anyone will show me a 
method of investigating these relations 
I will proceed. 

"Inspectors of this office have ques- 
tioned officers of the agency. They 
asked what service the establishment 
performed. The answer was that the 
Agency acted as a collector. When the 
inspectors inquired if the return in 
money was not excessive, the agency 
officers replied that they set their own 
price on what they considered a valua- 
ble service. 

"Beyond that, this office could not go. 
The Agency is a corporation under the 
laws of this state. Any investigation 
of its affairs would have to be made by 
the Attorney-General. I believe that 
a certain agent-manager is now bring- 
ing a suit for an accounting, on the 
ground that the Agency and Booking 
Offices exacted excessive fees from him. 
If the trial of the suit discloses legfal 
proof that comissions in excess of the 
legal five per cent are being collected 
by the United Booking Offices by this 
oi» any other means, I shall have some- 
thing to base a proceeding on. I am 
watching the litigation closely 



"Certain persons have charged that 
I am unduly biased in favor of the 
United Booking Offices. This is un- 
true. I owe no obligation either to 
any actor or any manager, and if any 
person is able to show me where there 
has been a violation. I will proceed ir- 
respective of whom 'lie investigation 
hurts. 

"The remedy, if a remedy is needed, 
lies in the hands of the actors them- 
selves. I went so far recently as to call 
in the aid of Judge Whitman, district 
attorney, to examine into certain 
charges of the payment of excessive 
commissions. The district attorney's 
office subpoenaed a number of actors, 
among them Will J. Cooke. With one 
accord they declined to give testimony 
of the payment of excessive commis- 
sions, on the ground that by doing so 
they would prejudice their chances of 
securing bookings. After several auch 
refusals, Judge Whitman stopped his 
investigation and gave it up as hope- 
less. The only way I can see to have 
this matter of illegal commissions laid 
open is to have some actor who has 
paid the excessive fees bring a com- 
plaint in this office. 

"What becomes of the money col- 
lected by the Vaudeville Collection 
Agency we have no means of finding 
out. An examination of the books of 
the United Booking Offices by this 
office does not disclose the receipt of 
anything but the legal five per cent. 
The license commissioner may only 
examine the books of an agent in so 
far as they disclose his receipt of book- 
ing fees. The Employment Agency 
law does not give him the power to 
have the business audited." 



theatres booking through the U. B. O. 
and rendering statements to the agents. 
These statements consist of names of 
acts, amount of salary received, of com- 
mission deducted by the theatre, and 
the amount due the agent, which is 
usually one-half the total credit to him. 
Resident managers of vaudeville the- 
atres receive a slip with each duplicate 
contract informing him to deduct the 
commission and return it to the office 
of the Vaudeville Collection Agency. 
Prior to the "split commission" in the 
United Rooking Offices, the agent col- 
lected his own commission, through the 
act mailing him the amount due. 



while others, for whom the Vaudeville 
Collection Agency did not do one whit 
more service, had to give up fifty per 
cent. 

The reasons for the difference in col- 
lection fees were several, and while it 
has never been printed that discrimin- 
ation was exercised by the United Book- 
ing Offices in the "split commission," 
it has been known among the agents 
interested that this was so. The agents 
favored have been often mentioned by 
name in connection with the "split 
graft." 

The Vaudeville Collection Agency 
handles about $400.00 each season as 



commission. One half of this goes to 
the agents; the other half goes where? 
Who gets it? Who does the attorney 
for the U. B. O. represent as president 
of the Vaudeville Collection Agency? 

Is the receipt of seven and one-half 
per cent commission on the salary of 
an act in violation of the Agency Law, 
which says no licensed agent (which 
means persons as well) shall receive 
directly or indirectly over five per cent 
commission? 



BOOKED BY CONSOLIDATED. 

Anna Eva Fay has signed a contract 
to play for the Consolidated Booking 
Offices, opening a full week at the 
McKinley Square Monday. She will 
play ten weeks. Fanny Rice opened 
at the DeKalb Monday while Cedora, 
"The Girl in the Golden Globe," who 
has been west, has been given a route 
by the Consolidated. The Otto Bros, 
started over the time at the 86th Street 
Monday. Harry First and Florence 
Hadley have been engaged to play 
"The Strongest Link," by the same 
agency. 



DOUTRIOK BUSINESS CO NTINUE D. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

The business built up by the late 
Charles Doutrick will be continued by 
his associate and dearest friend in life, 
C. M. Lavinge. Emma Langer, Dou- 
trick's stenographer, will assist La- 
vinge in continuing the agency. This 
decision was reached after the Dou- 
trick managers held a meeting and 
suggested it to Lavinge. 

Charles Doutrick, who suddenly died 
last week, was buried at hit home in 
Monticello, la., Saturday morning. The 
funeral was attended by a number of 
prominent Chicago agents and artists, 
many of whom sent floral offerings. 



SELLING BOOKING RIGHTS. 

Something new has turned up in the 
booking of acts. Producers or p«-o- 
motors, those with one or two vaude- 
ville acts under their control, have been 
offering the "booking rights" to agents 
for a cash consideration. This week 
one promoter asked an agent $150. 

"Sale of the booking privilege" makes 
the agent laugh. He has his own 
troubles getting along on one-half oi 
what he earns, without paying a bonus 
besides to help fatten the "split-com- 
mission graft" of the United Booking 
Offices. 



KID McCOY FILM. 

A feature film of Kid McCoy's re- 
cent arrest and subsequent detention 
for alleged implication in a big jewel 
robbery abroad, has been made. Kid 
McCoy posed for the picture. 



8 



VARIETY 



50-CENT VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT 
IN PRO CESS OF FORMATION 

Several New Houses Seating from 1800 to 2800 to be Built 

in New York and Brooklyn. New York and Pittsburgh 

People Interested. Ed Margolies Attending to 

Realty End of Enterprise. Another Year 

Before Consummated 



A proposition to play 50-cent vaude- 
ville in a brand new circuit that has 
been simmering for a year past is 
being rapidly focused, although an- 
other year will be required to see the 
enterprise in running order. 

All details and persons connected 
with the venture are held in secret, 
excepting that Ed Margolies has charge 
of the real estate operations. 

New York and Pittsburgh capital- 
ists interested, it is said, have sub- 
scribed the necessary amounts to go 
ahead with the venture. The amount 
needed is a large one. Behind it the 
names of two or three very well known 
people are mentioned. While none is 
a showman, at least two have been 
connected indirectly with theatricals. 

The promoter is familiar with vaude- 
ville. He has had the bee for a long 
while that fifty-cent vaudeville is the 
coming variety entertainment. He be- 
lieves that a scale between the prices 
of the big and small time, in a house 
of large capacity, will practically cor- 
ner the market. 

The theatres will run from 1,800 to 
2,800 in capacity, with the biggest 
house seating 3,500. There will be but 
one of the latter size. Three are t o 
be put up in Brooklyn, the others scat- 
tered over Manhattan and the upper 
section of New York. The syndicate 
is delaying operations further than se- 
curing options on sites in the belief 
that it may, before Jan. 1, be able to 
pick off one or more houses now run- 
ning or building. 

The theatres will be named after a 
vaudeville manager whose name is ex- 
pected to carry some weight. 



STATE BOOKING AGENCY. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

The so-called Progressive Actors of 
this city are preparing for a new move 
that if successful will send a chill of fear 
through the local booking offices, par- 
ticularly the small ones who depend 
upon the exceptionally small time for 
their livelihood. 

Some one discovered in the thirtieth 
annual report of the Illinois Free Em- 
ployment Agencies, bureau of labor 
statistics that 600,000 'men and women se- 
cured employment in 184 different occu- 
pations without any financial outlay on 
their part or on that of their employers. 
This service cost the state seventy-one 
cents per capita. 

There are six free employment agencies 
in the state of Illinois, three in Chicago. 
The offices are in charge of a superin- 
tendent whose duties are outlined as fol- 
lows : "It shall be the duty of each 
superintendent of a free employment 
office to immediately put himself in com- 
munication with the principal manufac- 
turers, merchants and other employers 
of labor, and to use all diligence in se- 
curing the co-operation of said employ- 



ers of labor. To this end it shall be 
competent for such superintendents to 
advertise in the columns of newspa- 
pers, trade journals or other mediums 
to Ml." 

The Progressives now intend to make 
application for engagements in these free 
offices, thus forcing the superintendents 
to make known to the various managers 
within the state that he has available 
material for them. They expect the de- 
mand created by the actor registering 
in this way to cause the state to put com- 
petent persons to execute orders for at- 
tractions which will evolve into a theatri- 
cal department. If this move material- 
izes, the contract jumper will then come 
under the surveillance of the inspectors 
of these offices. 

Those behind the move are making an 
effort to have all the talent in town 
register at once and see how the scheme 
will work. Those who would be affected 
by its success, do not seem to take it 
seriously. 



LOEWS YORKVILLE ORPHEUM. 

The new pop vaudeville theatre now 
building at Lexington avenue and 86th 
street to house the Marcus Loew 
vaudeville shows will be known as the 
Yorkville Orpheum. It will open in 
December. 

Another of the Loew theatres, at 
Avenue B and 5th street, will open 
next month. 



FAMILY IN HARRISBURG. 

Harrisburg, Oct. 16. 
Wilraer & Vincent will open a 
Family theatre here shortly, playing 
pop vaudeville, against their other 
house playing the big time. 



MATTHEWS OR KEEFE? 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

It is announced that James C. Mat- 
thews will exclusively book the Gar- 
den, Kansas City, after Nov. 30. Up to 
that time the acts placed for that the- 
atre by the Theatrical Booking Corpor- 
ation (Walter Keefe) will be played, 
Matthews booking in the remainder of 
the shows. 

Matthews has wires from E. P. 
Churchill, manager of the Garden, con- 
firming the announcement. 

Walter Keefe, at the Consolidated 
Booking Offices, this week, stated he 
would continue to book the Garden, 
Kansas City. To substantiate his state- 
ment Mr. Keefe produced a wire from 
E. P. Churchill reading that no report 
circulated of a change in the booking 
connection had been authorized by him, 
and he could not be responsible for 
rumors. The wire also said that when 
a change was to be made Mr. Keefe 
would be informed direct. 



LOEW-8-C OUT FOR BIZ. 

The new joint booking agency of the 
Loew and Sullivan-Considine Circuits 
means business, according to Jos. M. 
Schenck and Chris. O. Brown, general 
booking managers for the respective 
vaudeville mains. 

The booking departments of the cir- 
cuits moved into their new offices in 
the Heidelberg Building Tuesday. They 
occupy the second floor front, facing 
Broadway, 42d street and 7th avenue 
There are nineteen windows, with noth- 
ing but glass between the offices and 
the street. 

The private offices of Messrs. Brown 
and Schenck are enclosed on the 7th 
avenue side. The remainder of the 
office is wide open, partitioned off by 
a brass railing. The managers book- 
ing through the combined agency will 
have desks in the windows. 

Messrs. Brown and Schenck stated 
that when settled they would consider 
applications for bookings on hand, and 
accept houses in any part of the coun- 
try. Mr. Schenck said (and Mr 
Brown concurred) that if they did not 
secure theatres to book in some cities 
they had in view, they would build. 

I. Harold Stern was the first visitor 
to the agency, after it was formally 
declared open. 

From a showman's point of view, the 
advertising window space for the Sul- 
livan-Considine and Loew Circuits on 
the busiest corner in the world is of 
more worth than the rent, said to be 
$15,000 annually. 

Yesterday Mr. Schenck, with Eddie 
Small, went over to Boston, where a 
branch booking office of the Loew 
Circuit will be established by Schenck. 
Mr. Small will be in charge of it. 

RIOT OYER AMATEURS. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 

There will be no more "amateur 
nights" at the American. The last fes- 
tival of that sort was given a few nights 
ago. 

The boys in the gallery started pro- 
ceedings by kidding the amateurs, end- 
ing by unloading bushels of decayed 
fruit and vegetables on the stage. The 
curtain was rung down and this week 
the house is dark. 



FISHER TAKES NORTHWEST. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
The Fisher Agency is booking for 
the northwestern territory, which was 
until a week ago under the wing of the 
W. V. M. A. It is reported that under 
the new arrangement most of the acts 
booked through the Chicago agency are 
being taken care of. 



WILLIARD GOING ABROAD. 

Chicago, Oct. 26. 

Williard, the man who grows seven 
inches at each performance in full view 
of an audience, leaves America next 
week for Europe in time to open at the 
Hippodrome, Liverpool, for Ernest Edel- 
sten who has secured a forty-eight week 
route for his ward. 

Before leaving Williard will spend a 
week in his home town and visit his 
folks for the first time in thirty years 
When he left home Williard was eight 
years of age. Having acquired the freak- 
ish habit of growing at will, Williard 
has a surprise planned for his parents 
who haven't the slightest idea of what 
he looks like. 



A SMALL TIME SAMPLE. 

Papers have been served on the 
stockholders of Lowe's (Harlem) Fifth 
Avenue Theatre Co. by Albert E. 
Lowe, former manager and one of the 
directors, asking for the appointment 
of a receiver for the house situated at 
Fifth avenue and 110th street. 

Lowe alleges in the papers he holds 
a three years' contract with the cor- 
poration as manager of the theatre and 
that he was ousted without cause. He 
also alleges misappropriation of the 
funds of the corporation and that cer- 
tain moneys of the concern were di- 
verted to other purposes. 

Besides Lowe, the stockholders are 
Harry Luftig, who is in the ladies' hats 
business; Isaak Weinman, in the elas- 
tic webbing business, and Jacob Gor- 
don, a lawyer. Until the new house 
was opened Luftig is said to have never 
entered a playhouse in nineteen years. 
One day his wife visited the new house 
with some friends. The theatre war 
crowded to the doors and Lowe, in the 
capacity of manager, joyfully an- 
nounced to her that it was impossible 
to admit another soul. Instead of 
this news pleasing her Mrs. Luftig was 
aggrieved. The wife of Gordon at 
various times, according to the papers 
prepared by Charles Hoffman, attor- 
ney for Lowe, took upon herself the 
duties of ticket seller, and, as an ex- 
pert, passing on the merits of the acts 
booked. 

On another occasion Weinman, in 
an endeavor to entertain some of his 
webbing customers, brought his friends 
to the theatre, the show was stopped 
and the pianist requested to play rag- 
time. For this the pianist received six 
cigars and a pair of garters. Luftig's 
son, "Moe," is a friend of Henry Beek- 
man, manager of the Grand theatre, 
and is said to have called that gentle- 
man into consultation to act in an ad- 
visory capacity. 

The United Booking Offices (Family 
Department) was supplying the talent 
until Joe Wood advised the "man- 
agers" they were paying too much for 
acts. One night, after Lowe had gone 
home, the directors met Wood at the 
theatre by appointment at 2.30 A. M., 
lighted up the place for his inspection 
and listened with bated breath for 
Wood's advice as to the future con- 
duct of the establishment. Wood se- 
cured the bookings and is now fur- 
nishing the acts. 

A settlement has been offered 
Li.»we. which he declined. 



KANSAS CITY DISCONTINUED. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
The Western Vaudeville Managers' 
Association has discontinued its Kansas 
City office, established and managed by 
Walter De Oria. Hereafter all booking 
for that territory will be handled from 
the Association's headquarters in Chi- 
cago. 

Immediately after announcing this 
move. C. E. Kohl assembled the local 
ten per cent, agents in his sanctum- 
sanctorum and advised them that here- 
after they would be expected to steer 
clear of the Garden theatre, Kansas City, 
and the Hippodrome. St Louis. 



J. Hartley Manners and Laurettc 
Taylor are on their way across the con- 
tinent from Los Angeles to New York 
Thev left the coast town Monday 



VARIETY 



VARIETY 

Published Weekly by 

VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Times Square. New York. 

8IMB SILVERMAN 

Proprietor. 



CHICAGO 

Majestic Theatre Bldf. 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 

LONDON 

t Green St.. Leicester 8q. 
W. BUCHANAN TAYLOR 

PARIS 

<C bis. Rue Balnt Dldler 
EDWARD G. KJCNDRBW 

BERLIN 

16 Karl St 
R. A. LRYY 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertising copy for current laeue moat 
reach New York office by • p. ra. Wednesday. 

Advertisement! by mall should be accom- 
panied by remittance. 



Annual 
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 



Single copies, 10 cents. 



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Entered as second-class matter at New York. 

Vol. XXVIII. October 18, 1912 N0T 7 

B. F. Keith might do one other 
thing besides coming to New York 
for the purpose of finding out what 
has been done to his name around 
here. He could investigate the United 
Booking Offices, its people and its 
ways of doing business. 

An investigation, if carried on by 
Mr. Keith or under his direction with- 
out the valuable suggestions that 
would be offered him, is very likely to 
help the Keith bank account, do much 
for the protection of managers supply- 
ing their vaudeville houses from the 
U. B. O. and hold up the drooping "big 
time." 

Mr. Keith is the largest individual 
owner of theatres in the United Of- 
6ces. If money is wasted in the en- 
gaging of acts, the Keith houses must 
pay the excess many times over. Other 
managers may suffer once, twice or 
more, according to the number of the- 
atres they operate, but the Keith Cir- 
cuit embraces around twenty houses, 
all playing "United vaudeville.' 



»» 



Perhaps Mr. Keith has not kept him- 
self posted upon vaudeville and its 
bookings. Or maybe his wealth has 
grown to proportions that a program 
in a Keith theatre costing the house 
around $2,400 and which has only an 
actual market value of $2,000 would be 
of no interest to him. Or that the dif- 
ference of $400 or $500 weekly in one 
theatre each week, multiplied by 
twenty during a season of forty weeks, 
reaching a total of many thousands, 
isn't worth inquiring into. 

The United Booking Offices has been 
unusually discreet this season in offer- 
ing high salaried acts low salaries. But 
one can not hear about small salaried 
acts at high salaries without surmising 
that something is rotten in Denmark. 

Of course, \J.nt the small salaried 
acts \x\\'-\ hi; h salaries are either 
booked through a certain agency or 
"direr' nay he merely a coincidence, 
yet ther; must h f room for thought 



when it has been reported a $125 act 
had to "give up" a "rake off" of $30 
weekly to a certain agency, while also 
paying ten per cent, commission, as 
long as it remained on the big time. 

Maybe no one is in a position to 
know whether Mr. Keith would be sur- 
prised to find a $250 act playing his 
houses that the "small time" never be- 
lieved was worth over $90 or $100. Or 
that a sketch that never should have 
been on the big time, and at the very 
most could not consistently ask for 
over $250, should be receiving $600 in 
the first grade houses and $500 a week 
in the second grade of "big time." Or 
that another "single turn" receiving 
$250 in the second grade theatres is 
probably as much surprised at the size 
of the contract figure as the people 
who hear it. Or another single getting 
$125 is perfectly willing on weeks when 
no "big time" engagement comes forth 
to hark back to . the small time and 
open shows there for its former sal- 
ary, $50 for seven days. 

In big time vaudeville of this day it 
is almost as important to ascertain 
who is booking the act as it is to know 
the amount of salary. Sometimes the 
two points dovetail splendidly. But 
taking the "$30 graft" on a $125 act as 
a basis of calculation, how much is the 
$600 sketch giving up? And wouldn't 
the $250 act (just between us) that 
thought itself fortunate to secure $100 
on the small time be satisfied, with $150 
on the big time? Would that act be 
greatly concerned as to who got the re- 
maining $100? 

If these acts must play and graft go 
on, how long can the managers book- 
ing through the United Booking Offices 
and who have not the wealth of Mr. 
Keith stand ilie gaff? Doesn't it look 
as though the conditions in bookings, 
regardless of auytl ing else, will dry up 
the big time vaudeville? vVho can say 
low long the* milkers of vaudeville 
will find the milk flowing? 



that Murdock is highly concerned in the 
welfare of a certain agency that books 
vaudeville acts? The report, if true, 
could not startle Mr. Albee, since his 
son is also said to be a member of this 
agency. No one suspects, however, 
that Albee, Junior, is a "dummy" for 
his father in this particular connection, 
though it has been a matter of com- 
ment that Albee, Junior, pays little at- 
tention to the agency's business. It 
has even been reported that not so long 
ago Messrs. Albee and Murdock had 
quite a spirited argument over this cer- 
tain agency. Those, however, are 
"street reports." Every one knows how 
perfectly unreliable they are. 

But still people on the street will 
talk. They say the presumed partners 
in the agency draw $75 weekly, 
to be charged up against their 
share of the profits, and that the re- 
mainder goes to some one not men- 
tioned in the title of the firm. More 
"street reports." How foolish to listen 
to them! 



Can S. Z. Poll afford to continue big 
time in his houses, even at the Poli 
rate of salary, if the big salaried shows 
continue to come along as calling for 
much money and a bad performance? 
Won't Mr. Poli soon realize that his 
"small time" houses, with infinitely less 
hazard, expense and worry, are return- 
ing him a far greater profit than he is 
obtaining in the "Poli houses" that are 
playing "United vaudeville"? Hasn't 
Mr. Poji already discovered that? And 
the other detached managers in the 
United Booking Offices? 

Vaudeville needs the acts that are 
not working. They are not working 
because one John J. Murdock has been 
handed the run of big time vaudeville, 
under the official caption of "Executive 
Manager" of the United Booking Of- 
fices. What could have Murdock prom- 
ised to obtain that position? It must 
have been more profit for the U. B. O., 
since it is reported Murdock is paid a 
percentage of the profit the agency 
earns. 

Murdock may be confined in his la- 
bors to the U. B. O.. but is he? Would 
it astonish Mr. Keith or E. F. Albee 
(Mr Keith's general manager) to learn 



But as a supposition that a certain 
agency did mean something to some 
one high in the power in the United 
Booking Offices, wouldn't it be worth 
while to create as much profit as 
could be conveniently done with that 
powerful assistance, when the money 
made must be divided up into so many 
piles? 

Few people around New York know 
of John J. Murdock. They have heard 
of him. He never owned a theatre and 
never pushed a business venture to 
success, but he seems to be supreme 
in the United Booking Offices, which 
means he is directing the big time 
vaudeville of the east. Quite some au- 
thority to invest in one man, with no 
theatrical enterprise that was success- 
ful to his creditl 



Mr. Murdock was first heard from in 
a general way when managing the Ma- 
.sonic Temple Roof in Chicago nine or 
ten years ago. Previously he had been 
a stage manager in Indianapolis and 
St. Louis. One of those awful "street 
reports" puts it that Murdock in his 
time found himself employed by one 
of the present members of a certain 
agency booking vaudeville acts through 
the United Booking Offices. 

A Chicago theatrical firm financed 
the Masonic Temple. Tt made a 
big splurge. Murdock paid large sal- 
aries for acts for those days. He also 
heavily billed and featured "The Girl 
with the Auburn Hair." This attracted 
attention to him in the west. The Ma- 
sonic Temple Roof is said to have 
closed its vaudeville career about 
$30,000 behind. But Murdock got 
a good job out of it. He went 
with Kohl, Castle & Middleton. 
They gave him charge of the 
Western Vaudeville .Association, and 
also some stock in middle-western 
vaudeville theatres. It is said this stock 
was to be paid for out of the profits 
apportioned to Murdock from the As- 
sociation. He steered the Western 
Vaudeville Association, a booking con- 
cern, for eight or nine years, when 
Martin Beck deemed it advisable to 
buy Murdock out of that agency. Mur- 
dock never "wner! a ♦heatre dur 



ing his reign there, nor was the 
Western Vaudeville Association con- 
sidered a desirable piece of property, 
excepting by people who understood it 
Of these Beck was one. He forthwith 
placed Charles E. Bray in charge, with 
instructions to build the agency up. 
This Mr. Bray did, to every one's sat- 
isfaction, including the managers who 
were booking through it. 

After leaving vaudeville Mr. Mur- 
dock organized the International Pic- 
ture Co., in Chicago, during a period 
when an excellent opportunity pre- 
sented itself for the development of 
an independent picture concern. The 
International company passed away 
after a brief existence, involving a net 
loss, it is said, of $200,000, although 
Mr. Murdock is not accused of having 
lost any part of that sum. While at- 
tempting to promote the International 
concern, Murdock tried to run a trade 
newspaper on the side, a Chicago pub- 
lication, which also faded into no- 
where. 



Then came his connection with the 
United Booking Offices, in the early 
stages of which he became interested 
in the Kinemacolor Co., of New York, 
then organizing to promote colored 
motion photography in America, a new 
industry for this side of the ocean. Mr. 
Murdock remained with the Kine- 
macolor company but for a short time, 
suddenly finding himself bereft of fur- 
ther power in it. The Kinemacolor 
Co. since had developed into a big in- 
stitution. 

Murdock then devoted his entire at- 
tention to vaudeville, big time vaude- 
ville, with this pleasant result — that big 
time vaudeville is now more thoroughly 
demoralized than it has ever been — 
that the small time vaudeville has 
gained greater headway than was ever 
thought possible it could, and that 
there is such an insecure feeling among 
big time managers, agents and acts that 
the vaudeville John J. Murdock gov- 
erns is not now a staple article. 

Murdock is not a theatre owner or 
manager; E. F. Albee owns one house. 
Albee has gotten what he went after 
in vaudeville, and also accumulated a 
fortune. Murdock is out after his. 

Doesn't Mr. Keith believe that upon 
the facts and for the preservation of 
big time vaudeville, its managers and 
actors, an investigation of the United 
Booking Offices just now would mean 
something to vaudeville's future? 

Mr. Keith doesn't want to see his 
houses playing three shows a day once 
more. Nor do other managers. But 
big time vaudeville can't stand the 
strain. There is too much intrigue, 
lack of confidence and "trimming." A 
smaller big time house that might be 
content with a profit of from $10,000 
to $15,000 a year hasn't a chance, be- 
cause the padded salaries and bad acts 
are eating up the former profits, while 
at the same time driving away patron- 
age. 

Do a little investigating, Mr. Keith! 
Big time vaudeville is entitlcrl to it 
from you. You have pained the con- 
!f"1; now protect it. 



10 



VARIETY 



HARRIS THEATRES FOR LEASE; 

OFFE RED BOT H FACTIONS 

Klaw & Erlanger and the Shuberts Reported Having 

Declined Offer to Take Over Harris, Fulton and 

Hudson Theatres From Harris Estate. 



The theatrical news of the week 
along Broadway has been concerning 
the three New York theatres of the 
Henry B. Harris Estate. While up to 
Wednesday nothing about a contem- 
plated sale or leasing of the houses 
found its way into the dailies, theatri- 
cal newspaper men had heard the ru- 
mor the Shuberts might take over the 
• theatres. They buzzed around Lee 
Shubert Tuesday night. Mr. Shubert 
informed them he did not intend to 
lease. 

A part of the story the men on the 
dailies missed was that William Har- 
ris, acting on behalf of the widow of 
his son, placed a proposition before 
Klaw & Erlanger to assume the man- 
agement of the Harris theatres (ex- 
cepting the Park). The proposition to 
K. & E. included also Charles Froh- 
man. It is said $150,000 cash was 
asked, with "The Syndicate" managers 
to operate, holding an interest to pro- 
tect the investment and giving Mrs. 
Harris a percentage of any profit. 

K. & E. rejected the offer, when 
Mr. Harris is reported to have sub- 
mitted a rental proposal to the Shu- 
berts. As early as last Friday Lee 
Shubert seems to have concluded he 
did not want the Harris houses, al- 
though dickering has been going on 
since. Wednesday it was rumored that 
a matter of terms only stood between 
the Shuberts and the deal going 
through. 

The Harris Estate placed a figure of 
over $100,000 as rent upon the three 
pieces of theatrical property. It was 
said the Shuberts did not care to add 
the theatres to their present circuit, 
making it incumbent upon them to find 
attractions for that many more houses 
in a season when profitable shows for 
small theatres appear to be a scarce 
commodity. 

Shortly after the death of the late 
Henry B. Harris in the Titantic disas- 
ter, it was reported the Shuberts had 
submitted a proposal for the manager's 
houses. Klaw & Erlanger conferred 
with William Harris and it was said at 
the time an understanding had been 
reached that the realty of the estate, 
also the stars appearing under the Har- 
ris management, should be held intact, 
for the benefit of the widow. 

Since then it has been variously ru- 
mored the theatres could be had. No 
pronounced success has gone into a 
Harris house as yet, and the advanced 
season proved somewhat discouraging. 

The Liebler Co. is reported as hold- 
ing what is practically a booking agree- 
ment over this season for the Hudson. 
The Fulton is a "parlor house." The 
Hackett is not much larger. 

The Park is the property of William 
Harris. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
It is rumored here that the Shuberts 
have taken over the Harris Estate the- 



atres, with its stars, Rose Stahl and 
Helen Ware. 

Miss Stahl is under contract for an- 
other year to the late Henry B. Har- 
ris. As "Maggie Pepper" (the Stahl 
piece) is the single one of the Harris 
enterprises at present making money, 
it is unlikely it would be disposed of. 
What the future engagements of Miss 
Stahl are, after the expiration of the 
Harris contract, have not been even 
rumored. 



HOBLITZELL TRAVELLING. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
Karl Hoblitzell, president of the In- 
terstate Circuit, left Chicago last 
week for a two months' trip to Pasa- 
dena, Cal., where he will visit his sis- 
ter. During his absence, Celia Bloom 
will direct the booking, with Azby 
Chouteau scrutinizing the inside af- 
fairs of the southern chain. 



FEW "LOLLAR SHOWS*' ON COAST 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 

Managers of coast theatres that have 
featured the better class of popular- 
pi. ced road shows in past seasons arc 
reported to be having their troubles 
this fall to get a sufficient number of 
what are known as the "dollar top" at- 
tractions to make it worth their while 
to operate their houses. Just what is 
exactly responsible for this unusual con- 
dition is not apparent, but it is obvi- 
ous that the producers of the "dollar 
shows" in the east, for some reason 
or other, have not cared to send their 
attractions coastward, with the result 
that "In Old Kentucky" is about the 
only offering of this class to speak of 
that will be seen out this way this side 
of New Year's. 

An analysis of the situation would 
seem to lead up to the closing of the 
Savoy of this city "to pop traveling 
combinations, together with the inabil- 
ity of the latter to find an available 
theatre in Los Angeles. 

Migrating attractions naturally get 
a lot of publicity in these two very im- 
portant cities, that is invaluable when 
playing contiguous territory, as well 
as from one to two weeks profitable 
time in each place. With nothing in 
sight out here now but the smaller 
one-night stands, the dearth of good 
shows headed for the coast is not to be 
wondered at in the least. 



BRINGING SHOW EAST. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

H. H. Frazec. has cancelled all the 
middle west time for "Ready Money" 
and will play it through the east. Frazee 
and Wood have also canceled western 
time for "Madame Sherry" and will 
take that piece east also. 

"A Prince of Tonight," playing the 
Pacific Coast, will be brought into Iowa, 
Illinois and Wisconsin, beginning next 
week. . 

Belle Baker was taken out of the 
program for the Orpheum, Brooklyn, 
this week. 



CHORUS GIRL'S WINDFALL 

Juliet Lang, a former show girl with 

the original "Red Rose" company, has 
just been notified that she is the sole 
heir to 300 acres of land in the prov- 
ince of Santa Catarina, Lower Califor- 
nia. 

Miss Lang has engaged Jacob Weiss- 
berger to look after her legal interests 
down there. From the papers in his 
possession it appears that there are 
numerous veins of gold, silver and 
aluminum on the property, which will 
give the land tract a large value 



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ASKIN'S STUDEBAKER TERMS. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

(Iarry Askin is again being pressed 
to take over the management of the 
Studcbaker. It was thought Askin 
would assume charge of the house 
commencing O :r. \ but withdrew be- 
cause the financial proposition was 
shifted too often from its original 
figures. 

U is now learned ihat bcrt C. Whit- 
ney, who purcl ased a one-third in- 
terest in the house from Chas. B. Dil- 
lingham and W. F. Connor, wants to 
go in fifty-fifty with Askin on a new 
lease, with Askin as manager and pro- 
ducer. 

Askin is quite willing to take the 
house on his own terms, asking com- 
plete control on a flat rental basis. It 
is not thought likely that the deal will 
go through. 

Efforts are being made by Manager 
E. J. Sullivan to find an attraction for 
the Studebaker, now dark. It was 
thought for a time that the house 
would be kept closed. Mr. Sullivan, 
who has managed Mme. Sarah Bern- 
hardt on two tours of the country, has 
been asked to assume charge of her 
next tour. 

It is understood Geo. W. Leder:r 
is figuring upon placing a musical 
stock company at the Studebaker, Chi- 
cago. 



ACTRESS HELD. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 16. 

Mrs. Marjorie Empting, of musical 
comedy, is held on a charge of having 
obtained money under false pretenses 
by giving a check for $10,000 to secure 
a loan of $500. 

She declares her love for her hus- 
band and her belief that she was heir- 
ess to $70,000 caused the check writing. 



MORRIS TAKING A CHANCE. 

William Morris is going to take a 
chance with Cosmo Hamilton's "Blind- 
ness of Virtue." It may go into the 
39th Street theatre Oct. 28, supplant- 
ing "The Brute," Comstock & Gest's 
play, which has been interesting the 
ushers for a couple of weeks. "The 
Brute" may go on the road or take the 
other path. 

"The Blindness of Virtue" has been 
playing Canada. Mr. Morris was well 
satisfied with the Montreal showing 
but his advance man found a place call- 
ed Gait. The manager wired to find 
out if there were any more towns in 
Canada like that one. Informed the 
woods were full of them, he concluded 
to hazard a New York showing for 
two weeks. 



"GYPSY" AFTER "BEST GIRL." 

"The Gypsy," a new two-act play, book 
and lyrics by Frank Pixley, and music 
by Gustav Ludcrs, and staged by A. M. 
Holbrook, which is being produced by 
John Cort, is booked for a New York 
showing at the Park theatre, Nov. 11, 
following "My Best Girl." 

In the organization will be Vio- 
let Seaton, Eleanor Kent, Josephiii" 
Morse, Blanch West, Anna Wilkes. 
Ronald Hamilton Earle, Ernest Lam- 
bart, John Hazzard, William Sellery. 
Forrest Winnant, Francis Lieb. 

The Clifton Crawford show leave* 
New York, Nov. 9, for Boston. 



VARIETY 



11 



SEC 



AL HAYMAN BROKEN DOWN 
WITH N ERVOUS AFFLICTION 

Maude Adams 9 Tremendous Drawing Power. Second 

"First Night" for "The Daughter of Heaven. " 

Hottest Stage Pace Ever in Musical Productions. 

"Chickens" Back to the Hennery. Another 

Try For "Charity Girl" 

By LEANDER RICHARDSON 



It is not true, as many have sup- 
posed, that Al. Hayman, formerly 
financial head of the Theatrical Syn- 
dicate, is suffering from a stroke of 
paralysis affecting his right side. A re- 
port to this end has been current for 
some time, and probably has its basis 
in the outward appearance and bearing 
of the capitalist. 

Several times lately Mr. Hayman has 
been seen walking along the street, al- 
ways with an associate or attendant. 
His gait is halting, his right hand 
hangs practically useless, his features 
are drawn as with torture, his eyes are 
dull, he has lost a great deal of weight, 
and his skin is loose and colorless. 

The general effect is that of a recent 
stroke, but Mr. Hayman's friends may 
comfort themselves with the assurance 
that he is not a victim to this poten- 
tial malady. Indeed, the patient might 
have undergone less bodily suffering if 
he really had sustained a paralytic at- 
tack. 

The agency that is responsible for 
the startling change in his looks and 
carriage is a nervous affection which 
has spread up and down his right side, 
accompanying its progress with the ex- 
tremist suffering. Mr. Hayman in his 
search for relief has consulted the 
most eminent specialists of Europe, 
without the slightest amelioration of 
his condition. 

He was beginning to feel a sense of 
hopelessness when the name of an 
American practitioner was recommen- 
ded to him so highly that he imme- 
diately made the voyage to this coun- 
try, and placed himself in the hands of 
this physician. A part of the regi- 
men prescribed by the native doctor is 
a daily walk, made brief by the diffi- 
culty with which Mr. Hayman is able 
to manage the process of locomotion. 

There is no doubt that the rich man 
is in a condition of the utmost grav- 
ity. The constant racking of his sys- 
tem, with its attending loss of natural 
sleep, has sapped his vitality and aged 
him almost unbelievably, and his 
friends are greatly alarmed. 

Maude Adams' Receipts. 

The hold of Maude Adams upon the 
theatre going public continues to be 
one of the most extraordinary features 
of life in America, where the notorious 
tendency toward favorites of the stage 
is to "forget it." There have been pub- 
lished some brief announcements that 
Miss Adams would appear at the Em- 
pire theatre at Christmas with a revi- 
val of "Peter Pan"' — nothing about 
ticket sales, or mail orders, or anything 
of the kind. Yet, up to last Saturday 
night 1,071 letters had been received 
ordering seats for the engagement. 

Through the country this star has 



been sweeping with really amazing re- 
sults. In towns visited by the number 
two "Peter Pan" company the receipts 
are running on at the rate of $2,100, 
or better, for each performance, and 
extra matinees are of almost daily oc- 
currence. The net profits must be very 
great, upon the natural presumption 
that the company, share represents the 
bulk of the gross, say eighty per cent. 
As a piece of inside history it may 
be stated that J. M. Barrie never has 
seen Maude Adams in one of his own 
comedies, which are so closely linked 
with her fame. He will come over 
during the "Peter Pan" period. 

Second First Night. 

Now that Liebler & Co. have estab- 
lished the precedent of giving their 
big premieres at the Century theatre 
on Saturday afternoons, it is interest- 
ing to note that they are going a step 
further and will have a second first 
night of "The Daughter of Heaven." 
The opening performance of this spec- 
tacle lasted from two in the afternoon 
until half past six at night, owing to 
the enormously heavy production. The 
time has been greatly shortened, the 
play itself extensively pruned, and the 
stage force thoroughly drilled. 

The management desires the critics 
and other first nighters to see the big 
pageant at its best, and for this rea- 
son they have been, or will be, invited 
to a second inspection. In the pub- 
lished notices of the time saving it is 
observed that "the stage crews have re- 
covered from their nervousness." 

Good heavens! Has the artistic tem- 
perament extended to the grips? Are 
we to have our scenes shuffled and our 
lights worked by artists? Union art- 
ists at that? If so, will they make up 
for their parts and scrap for the centre 
of the stage? 

Why, the possibilities are away be- 
yond human imagination. 

Where Do We Quit? 

Where is this building of big shov/s 
to stop? Where do we get off? 

By use of the word "we" I am not 
declaring myself in with theatrical 
management, for I have enough trou- 
bles of my own. I merely wish to be 
neighborly, in calling attention to the 
stupendous task facing New York this 
season if it is going to pay the salary 
sheets of the shows already here and 
those to come. Surely there never be- 
fore was such a clash of the giants. 

Already we have the Hippodrome 
and the Winter Garden shows, "Oh! 
<>h! Dclphine." "The Count of Lux- 
embourg." "Tiie Merry Countess." 
"The Woman .Haters." "Hanky Pankv" 
and "The Daughter of Heaven." all 
under enormous expense. 



Confronting us in the immediate fu- 
ture are the "Ziegfeld Follies," far 
more costly than any of these pro- 
ductions in the past; the Montgomery 
and. Stone-Elsie Janis piece, organized 
upon such a scale of magnitude that 
the Globe theatre must be jammed to 
the top for the management to break 
even; "The Sun Dodgers/' with the ex- 
pensive Eva Tanguay and a throng of 
other highly paid performers; the new 
Weber and Fields' own presentation, 
with a small regiment of big stars; the 
Damrosch opera, -whicr goes into the 
Broadway with a payroll that would 
choke the subway; the new Gertiude 
Hoffmann revue, «md the Lord only 
knows what else. 

Every one of these attractions ha 
got to draw extraordinary receipts or 
back away defeated. As each <»f ihc 
iresh ones comet *o town the situation 
of the others becomes more difficult. 
The pace is hotte.* than at any time in 
stage history in any purl of the world, 
and if New York can meet it a very 
rifficult problem wdl have been s dved. 

There is an clement in theatrical 
management just now that is very 
much more perplexing and charged 
with anxiety than the question of too 
many of the small theatres which have 
been coming into existence during the 
past few years. It is the competition 
of colossal shows. 

Good Bye, Chickens. 

Apparently the day of the broiler is 
on the wane, and we are about to fall 
back upon the billowy and beaming 
show girl. With Saturday night the 
chickens !:i Al. Woods' "Woman Ha- 
ters" incubator will be turned loo c, 
and the peacocks *vill sweep majestic- 
ally in. There is a similar state of 
things in another lar^e poultry exhibit 
on Broadway just now, and altogether 
it look very much as though the cuties 
were a goner. 

It is odd htw the public fancy 
changes in the nntrcr of femininity. At 
one moment it yearns for females con- 
structed after the pattern of a beer 
truck, and of a sudden it shifts to wil- 
lowy damsels with no more curves 
than a ramrod. Perhaps this is a good 
scheme, for it gives all hands a chance 
to be in the fashion at some time, and 
those who last long enough can go to 
bat twice. 

"Charity Girl" Again. 

George W. Ledercr will reorganize 
"The Charity Girl" and send it out 
again after election. 

"All last week at the Globe," said 
Mr. Lcderer, yesterday, "the receipts 
climbed up Jteadily, with dinky little 
ads in the papers and no effort at all 
to boost business. Saturday night .ve 
played to capacity. You can't tell mc 
that a piece which drew nearly $34,000 
in three weeks in Chicago is a failure, 
and, anyway, I am going to have an- 
other try at it. I had the same expe- 
rience with 'The Belle of New York.' 
It was such frost that I couldn't get 
time for it, yet the piece made a for- 
tune when it liad its chance. 

"I have two other manuscripts new 
upon which I am beginning to busy 
myself. One of these is a foreign nins- 
ical success with a very striking nov- 
elty m it. 1 am treating tr r a Chicago 



theatre in which to place this work, 
i.olding the other in reserve." 

Little Theatre's Showy Cast 

It is a showy and impressive playbill 
that Winthrop Ames presents to hit 
patrons at the Little Th;itre with "The 
Affairs of Anatol," in which no less 
than five recognized leading women 
appear. These include Marguerite 
Clark, Gail Kane, Doris Keane, Kath- 
erinc Emmet and Isabelle Lee. Add to 
these names John Barrymore and Os- 
wald York, and you have enough really 
first-class artillery to make an impos- 
ing and effective battery. 

But the great thing a»( ut it is that 
the salary expense of the production 
practically stops at this pobl. for the 
only two others in the "Aaa.ol" cast 
arc actors of no very great sio.nent — 
capable, but not high priced. TI c cun- 
ning of the author who framt4 this 
piece so as to require a very few play- 
ers who should be of a qjality likely 
to attract on their merits without 
breaking the management, was equalled 
only by Mr. Ames' adrcit handling of 
it, for the layout, impressive as it is, 
falls easily within the earning capacity 
oi this diminutive but charming the- 
atre. 

Figure up the salary list for yourself 
and see how it will surprise you. 

Great Timet in Philly. 

Philadelphia seems to have woke up, 
though it has taken some unusual at- 
tractions to turn the desirable trick. 
"The Lady of the Slipper," the new 
Montgomery and Stone-Elsie Janis 
production, has been drawing from 
$2,000 to $2,200 a performance. The 
new "Ziegfeld Follies" has been right 
upon the heels of this attraction in box 
office receipts, and David Warfield, in 
"The Return of Peter Grimm," has 
been following along so close up as not 
to leave any room for envy. 

Of course, Warfield is showing the 
greatest net profit, for his production 
doesn't cost more than one-eighth of 
the outlay required for either of the 
others, which must be enormously ex- 
pensive. So his state of mind must be 
quite easy, even though he is running 
third in gros. receipts. 

The Dillingham show, which is due 
at the Globe iheatre here, has regis- 
tered a genrin sensation, ar.d looks 
like an all winter hit in New York. The 
new "Follies" seems a cinch for a sim- 
ilar outcome, vastly increasing the 
competition along Broadway. 

As for Philadelphia, most likely it 
will doze off again. 

Miss Hoffmann in Boston. 

A Toxen Worm seems to have very 
successfully initiated his Boston cam- 
paign for the Messrs. Shubcrt. Writ- 
ing the other day of the Gertrude Hoff- 
mann show, he said: 

"After three postponements, \v .• 
opened the Hoffmann show in Boston 
to $2,400, which is the largest opening 
known in Boston for a long time, par- 
ticularly for a new show, with no New 
York reputation behind it. The show 
is a knockout from start to finish, and 
Ihc business has remained at the saim: 
figure > ever since. The engagement 
has been extended, and the week hell 
tor Gaby Deslys has been placed at a 
(Continued on page 10J 



12 



VARIETY 



CHILDREN UNDER SCHOOL AOE 
NOT WITHI N STATE CHILD LAW 

Attorney Adolph Marks of Chicago Raises New Point. 

Secures Verdict for Liebler & Co. "The Charity Girl" 

Management Also Cleared of Alleged Violation 



Chicago, Oct. 16. 

A most important theatrical decision 
was recorded last week when Adolph 
Marks, the local theatrical attorney, 
successfully defended Liebler & Co. on 
a charge of violating the State Child 
Labor btatute through the employment 
oi a three-year old boy in their pro- 
duction of "The Garden of Allah" now 
running at the Auditorium. 

Marks raised a question that has 
evidently been hitherto overlooked in 
the defense of those employing minors, 
holding that the statute which calls for 
the non-employment of children dur- 
ing school hours, was written for the 
protection of school children, and since 
the Illinois school age is marked at 
six years, the child engaged by the 
Licblers could not possibly come un- 
der the ban. 

After deliberating for several min- 
utes under the instructions of Judge 
Tornbaugh in the municipal court, the 
jury returned a verdict of not guilty. 

This verdict also clears the promo- 
tors of "The Charity Girl" from a sim- 
ilar charge for employing two young 
children during the Chicago run of the 
piece. Marks was the attorney in both 
instances which were prosecuted by the 
State's Attorney's ofrice. 

There are a great many acts here- 
abouts who employ minors, several 
carrying infants across the stage, 
which have been handicapped by the 
Illinois law. The decision secured by 
Marks will make it possible for them 
to play within the state limits without 
molestation. The child labor law has 
been strictly enforced by the state at- 
torney heretofore. 



MORRISONS "MARY" RIGHTS. 

Leigh Morrison secured the produ- 
cing rights to "What Happened to 
Mary?" Wednesday, signing an agree- 
ment with the McClurc Publishing Co. 
Morrison will make arrangements for 
an immediate production of the story, 
which has been appearing in the La- 
dies' World. 

"What Happened to Mary?" has also 
received publicity through the special 
scries of films the Edison people man- 
ufacture each month. Half a dozen 
managers were after the dramatic 
rights. 



TAKES ANOTHER VERSION. 

Lee Arthur's dramatization of the 
"Potash & Perlmutter" stories has 
been rejected by A. H. Woods, as was 
also a version submitted by Anne Cald- 
well. 

Woods has accepted a play with the 
two Montague Glass characters, pre- 
pared by Charles Klein and George 
V. Hobart, and may place it in rehear- 
sal shortly. 



RURR MrlNTOSH HURT. 

San Francisco. Oct. 16. 
Purr Mcintosh, actor, artist and war 
correspondent, is in the McNutt Hos- 



pital here, suffering from a broken rib 
and other injuries, sustained when he 
fell down the elevator shaft of a studio 
building on Powell street. 

The doctors at this time do not know 
how serious the actor's injuries are. 



HOCHUR AT NEW TIVOLI. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
Will R. Rocher, director of the old 
Tivoli, has been engaged to act as di- 
rector of the new establishment of the 
same name when it is thrown open 
next spring under the management of 
Doc Leavy. Mme. Tettrazini will be 
the star of the organization. Rocher 
was until lately connected with the 
Kolb and Dill company. 



CAMPBELL'S "GHOST." 

Maurice Campbell has contracted 
with Paul Dickey and Charles W. God- 
dard to produce in January a play 
called "The Ghost." 



GUS THOMAS' OPINION. 

Augustus Thomas will not produce 
any more plays this season. He says 
there is no room for successes at the 
present time and that there does not 
seem to be any likelihood of any. 



SUNDAY SHOW IN COURT. 

Sydney Rosenfeld, moving spirit and 
producer of the society known as the 
American Federation of Theatregoers, 
and George J. Appleton, manager of 
the Elliott theatre, were summoned be- 
fore Judge McAdoo Wednesday for giv- 
ing a theatrical entertainment at the 
Elliott last Sunda., evening. 

The play offered was "The Higher 
Call." The contention of the defense 
is that it was given for the exclusive 
delectation of the Federation and not 
open to the public. 

At William A. Brady's office nothing 
was known of the action of the police 
with regard to the entertainment given 
at the Elliott. It was added that they 
were not at all interested and did not 
believe that it had any bearing on the 
proposed performances to be given by 
the Sunday Club at the Playhouse. 



WON'T PLAY SUNDAYS. 

St. Louis, Oct. 16. 
"When Bunty Pulls the Strings" is 
here this week, but the company will 
not appear on Sundays. 



MUSICAL "ONLY WAY." 

A musical, "The Only Way" show, 
has been placed for the smaller one- 
nighters in the south. It ' is a Pa- 
cific Coast production. 

"Freckles," a new show of this sea- 
son, now in the middle west, will also 
go south soon. 



Richard Kippling, recently general 
manager of the Honolulu Amusement 
Co., -arrived in San Francisco from the 
Hawaiian Islands this week. 



BRADY PICKS UP $8,000. 

Boston, Oct. 16. 

Three thousand dollars was picked 
up by William A. Brady when receiv- 
ing that amount for his "Bought and 
Paid For" time (two weeks) at the 
Shubert. The Gertrude Hoffmann 
show wants to remain at the house 
over Election week and the next. 

The new Hoffmann show (opening 
last Thursday) has done very big 
here. It looks like $18,000 this week. 

Every one concerned in the Hoff- 
mann show was disheartened after the 
Albany opening. Due to play Boston 
the following Monday, the show laid 
off for three days, duiing which stren- 
uous labor was put upon the produc- 
tion. Ned Wayburn was called in to 
assume charge of the rebuilding. 

The reception the show got in Bos- 
ton from the press and public astound- 
ed its managers. 

The "Bought and Paid For" show 
will fill in one of its Boston weeks .it 
the Manhattan, New York, opening 
Nov. 4, the date upon which the pre- 
miere of "The Whip" was to have oc- 
curred. That has been postponed un- 
til Nov. 11. 



"MASTER" BOOKED TO DEPART. 

"The Master of the House" is booked 
to depart from the Lyric, Nov. 2. It 
will open at the West End, New York, 
Nov. 4, preliminary to a road tour over 
the big time of the Shuberts. 

Following at the Lyric will be Wil- 
liam Faversham, and succeeding him 
the Sam Bernard show is expected, if 
that production is then ready. Other- 
wise there is a bare chance Lew 
Fields' "Sun Dodgers" will take up 
the Lyric time, if the Broadway should 
be occupied by "The Dove of Peace." 



An act playing the small time in the 
west under the title "A Rose of Per- 
sia" is said to be using some of the 
material of "A Persian Garden." Louis 
Simon is taking legal steps to stop it. 




NELLIE O'CONNOR 

of the Six O'Connor Sisters. One west- 
ern newspaper says of her: "There Is 
one girl In the act who stands out from 
the rest. She Is endowed with a re- 
markable voice, nearly bass In fact and 
she uses this to elicit much fun. We 
predict that her name will be out In 
electric lights In front of biff theatres 
at no distant date." 



NO TROUBLE IN SOUTH BEND. 

South Bend, Oct. 16. 

Through an amicable agreement be- 
tween Harry G. Sommen, lessee ^f 
the Auditorium and Oliver theatre, and 
the International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employes, threatening trouble 
between the management of the South 
Bend theatres and stage hands has 
been averted. 

President A. L. Seville and Secre- 
tary George Connell, of the South 
Bend local, No. 187, were notified by 
the Alliance executive chiefs, New 
York, that everything had been sat- 
isfactorily settled. Sommers is located 
in New York. 

The agreement will affect about 
twenty-four men employed at the Au- 
ditorium and Oliveis. The managers 
will accept the union wage scale and 
employ a stage manager for each the- 
atre. 

Knoxville, Oct. 16. 

Owing to the departure of Vice- 
President James H. Screws of Mont- 
gomery, Ala., from the city, President 
Charles C. Shay of the International 
Alliance Theatrical Stage Employes, 
arrived this week from New York to 
take charge of the local theatre labor 
situation. 

Shay will likely remain here until 
some sort of an agreement is reached 
between the managers and union hands. 

President Shay will go to Rochester, 
N. Y., Nov. 11, as the delegate of 
the Alliance to the national convention 
of the American Federation of Labor. 
Colonel Bonn, St. Paul, originally 
chosen to go, will be unable to at- 
tend. The co-delegates will be James 
Lempke of Troy and John Suarez of 
St. Louis. 

If the International Alliarke Theatri- 
cal Stage Employes carries out its 
present intentions, one Mr. Jackson, 
who took out several shows under the 
direction of the Jackson Amusement 
Co. and left several members of the 
Alliance on the road waiting for a 
week's salary, will be haled into court 
unless he settles with the union stage 
hands. 

Fresno, Cal., Oct. 16. 
Peace has again been restored be- 
tween the I. A. T. S. E. and local man- 
agers and the new schedule has been 
accepted by the latter. No further fric- 
tion is anticipated. The union men arc 
pleased over the amicable settlement. 

Cincinnati, Oct. 16. 
The Walnut Street theatre has been 
placed on the "Unfair List" by the 
local labor unions. The claim is made 
the remodelling of the theatre was 
partially done by non-union labor. 



ALHAMBRA SOLD. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
William E. Salomon has taken title 
to the Alhambra and store buildings 
at the southeast corner of State street 
and Archer avenue. The new owner 
will make extensive alterations in the 
theatre, to play first class attractions. 
The purchase price named in the deed 
- < 1 ' ' '00. 

V:«.crve Nlcoll, "The London 
Hci:. < Eastern Wheel), has left the 
show ov.'ir.rf to illness. 



VARIETY 



13 



"DOVE OF PEACE" PLEASES; 
OTHER OPENING S REPORTED 

Trentini Has] Success In "The Firefly ;"J| f Mrs. Fisk's 

Presentation of "The High Road" Criticised and 

"Louisiana Lou"' Does Well In Initial 

Performance In Philadelphia 



Philadelphia, Oct. 16. 

"The Dove of Peace" at the Lyric; 
"Louisiana Lou" at the Walnut, and 
"Gypsy Love" at the Garrick were the 
new offerings of the season this week. 

"The Dove of Peace" was the most 
important, this being the initial pro- 
duction. It is by Walter Damrosch, 
book and lyrics by Wallace Irwin. Mr. 
Damrosch was present Tuesday even- 
ing when the comic opera had its first 
performance and he led the "March 
of the Militant Suffragettes" as an in- 
termezzo between the first and second 
acts. 

The piece was given a rousing send- 
off by an audience which almost filled 
the Lyric and showed evidence of its 
pleasure with the music which, 'al- 
though light, is of high calibre and 
brilliant. The performance ran off 
smoothly and the first night's impres- 
sion is that the piece will be a success. 
Henriette Wakefield, a Metropolitan 
Opera Company favorite, Robert Lee, 
an Englishman who was especially im- 
ported for the principal male role, Ruth 
Thorp and Frank Pollock, were all 
warmly received for their individual 
efforts. 

"Louisiana Lou" began its run, sched- 
uled to last many weeks, Monday 
night to a well filled house. The musi- 
cal* show, which had a long stay and 
big business in Chicago, was cordially 
received here. Press comments very 
favorable. 

Alexander Carr, Sophie Tucker, Bes- 
sie DeVoie, Eleanor Hennry, Burrell 
Barberetto and Lester Crawford are in 
the cast. The piece secured a fine start 
and everything appears favorable for a 
stay of some length. 

"Gypsy Love" was received and 
praised as a much improved show upon 
its return to the Garrick. Phyllis Par- 
tington and Arthur Albro have the 
principal roles, supported by an excel- 
lent company and a fine singing chorus. 
The opening night's business was very 
good considering strong opposition and 
the piece received warm praise from the 
press. 

"The Lady of the Slipper" is doing 
the business of the town. The Charles 
B. Dillingham production with Mont- 
gomery and Stone is said to have 
drawn $20,000 into the Chestnut Street 
Opera House last week. 

Ziegfeld's "Follies" at the Forrest is 
doing well, although a report has it 
the business dropped from $2,000 the 
opening night to $1,100 at the Tuesday 
evening (last week) performance. The 
show is being built up. 



Montreal, Oct. 16. 
"The problem interesting; the play 
weak," is the summing up of news- 
paper comment on "The High Road." 
Mrs. Fiske's new vehicle by Edward 
Sheldon, which received its first show- 
ing here Monday. 



The opinion of the reviewers is that 
fine acting in this case is not sufficient 
to cover stiffness of lines and a far- 
fetched plot. 

Syracuse, Oct. 16. 

Trentini's show, "The Firefly," un- 
der the direction of Arthur Hammer- 
stein, opened its season at the Em- 
pire Monday night. 

The general opinion is that Mr. Ham- 
merstein has given his star a beauti- 
ful production, with an excellent cast 
and enjoyable music, though a really 
catchy air is missing. 

Trentini's performance was consid- 
ered by the local critics superior to 
that she gave in "Naughty Marietta.'* 
Roy Atwell, a Syracuse boy, scored in 
the principal comedy role. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 16. 

"A Dollar Did It" is the new offer- 
ing at the Burbank. It is a capital 
farce, well played by Ralph Stewart 
and lone McGrane. Walter Edwards 
is excellent in a blackface role. 

Another newcomer to Los Angeles 
this week is "A Romance of the Un- 
derworld," with Holbrook Blynn, 
which opened successfully at the Ma- 
jestic. "The Round-Up," with Macklyi 
Arbuckle, is doing satisfactory busi- 
ness. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 

Capacity business continues at the 
Orpheum, where Ethel Barrymore is 
playing her second week in J. M. Bar- 
rie's "The Twelve Pound Look." At 
the Columbia "The Woman" looks like 
two weeks of capacity. Attendance is 
holding up satisfactorily at the Cort, 
where the Lombard! Opera Co. is the 
attraction. 

The interest in advance of the show- 
ing of "The Rose of Panama" is keen. 
Next week will sec the opening of 
Maude Fealy and James Durkin in 
"The Easiest Way." There is a healthy 
business at the Alcazar, but no danger 
of overrunning the capacity just now. 
The Paul Armstrong company opens 
at the American Oct. 20. 

REVIVING OLD BOY. 

Oakland, Cal., Oct. 16. 
A revival of "Uncle Josh Spruceby," 
is being made by Thomas J. Culligan. 
Tom Turner's band, a local organiza- 
tion, will be carried with the troupe. 
Arthur Hockwell will look after the 
show. 



LARGE WEEKS SALARY. 

Bridgeport, Conn., Oct. 16. 
Frances Nordstrom has accepted a 
large salary from the Poli stock man- 
agement to assume the leads here this 
week with the local company. She is 
to be featured in the billing. 



WM. WARMINGTON DIES. 

Syracuse, Oct. 16. 

William Warmington, manager oi 

the Primrose & Dockstader's min- 
strels, who has been confined in the 
Homeopathic Hospital since the show 
played here Oct. 4, died Tuesday night 
from the effects of an operation for 
blood poisoning. The body was 
shipped to-day to New York for burial. 

The news of "Billy" Warmington's 
death came as a severe shock to his 
many show colleagues. Warmington 
has been bothered with a slight scratch 
on his right foot, but thinking it was 
nothing but a corn paid little attention 
to the injury. 

All efforts to effect a cure proved fu- 
tile and the Syracuse surgeons ampu- 
tated the leg below the knee. Warm- 
ington rallied and it looked as though 
he would recover when he suffered a 
relapse. 

Warmington, aged 53 years, was a 
native of Jackson, Mich. He was mar- 
ried to Florence Huntley, an actress, 
seven years ago. She and a niece, Mrs. 
E. D. Hayes and a nephew, F. H. Mc- 
Clellan, of Rochelle, survive. 

Warmington had been in the show 
business since he was a youth, his first 
engagement being with Edwin Adams. 
He was Sol Smith Russell's manager 
for a long time, being Fred Burgess' 
partner. He produced "Skipped by the 
Light of the Moon" and realized some- 
thing like $200,000 on the venture. For 
four years he managed Denman 
Thompson in "The Old Homestead." 

He was a partner with E. E. Rice 
when they produced "The Girl From 
Paris." He was with George H. Prim- 
rose for three years and in recent sea- 
sons had put out "My Cinderella Girl" 
and "The Man of the Hour." 



REWRITING "UNWRITTEN LAW." 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
It is understood Eugene Walter has 
been engaged by H. H. Frazee to re- 
write "The Unwritten Law." It was 
taken off the boards shortly after being 
produced here last season. 




WEBER CIRCUIT CHANGES. 

The biggest production on the Weber 
Circuit, Lew Fields' "Tillie's Night- 
mare," leaves the Weber time Oct. V), 
to go on the southern one-night route, 
booked by Abe Thalheimer, of the 
W'eis office. Another Weber Circuit 
show, "The Girl From Tokio," also 
takes to southern territory playing the 
smaller one nighters down there. The 
"Tillie" company will first play the 
legit time at Little Rock. 

The Yorkville, now playing Loew 
vaudeville, is expected to be added to 
the Weber wheel Christmas week. The 
Prospect (Bronx), playing stock under 
Cecil Owen's directorship, will also be 
annexed by the Weber Circuit around 
the holidays. 

The Prospect stock company expects 
to take possession of its new home, be- 
ing built by Frank Gersten at 163d 
street and Southern Boulevard. 

The Lyceum, Buffalo, now in the 
course of construction, will play Weber 
shows as soon as ready for occupancy. 
That is expected some time in Decem- 
ber. 

"Baby Doll" is also scheduled to 
close in Milwaukee Oct. 26 and take to 
the southern one-nighters. The Arch 
Street, Philadelphia, will give up the 
present policy of popular priced com- 
binations and turn over to Hebrew 
stock. 

It is said that Mittenthal Brothers 
have opened negotiations with Stair & 
Havlin for the booking of their produc- 
tion of "The Confession." That firm's 
other two shows, "The Prosecutor" 
and "The Melting Pot," which started 
on the "pop" time, have been with- 
drawn. 

The Grand, Brooklyn, withdraws 
from the Weber pop circuit this week. 
Next Monday it will go into stock for 
an indefinite period. 

A company headed by Noel Travers, 
who will personally manage the com- 
pany, was organized this week, and 
will open Monday in "Lena Rivers." 
The future of the new policy depends 
a great deal on the box office receipts 
of the first week. 



NEW YORK'S BIGGEST DOINGS. 

The biggest doings in New York for 
the past two weeks have been the bat- 
tleships in the North River, the World 
Series, and "flops." 



"DISCOVERY" IN LA SALLE SHOW. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
Caroline Dixon, a discovery of R. H. 
Burnside, who staged "The Girl at the 
Gate" for the La Salle management, 
took her place in the caft of that musi- 
cal comedy last week. Angelina No- 
vasio has returned to handle the title 
role of "Louisiana Lou" in the road 
company. 



BIGGEST POST-CARD. 

The largest post-card on record goes 
to the credit of Will H. Wright, do- 
ing the press work for "Everywoman." 
From Canada Mr. Wright has sent a 
post-card through the mail, measuring 
11x14 inches. Next to the address is 
a sentence calling attention to "Every- 
woman" with an invitation to inspect 
the reverse side, carrying descriptive 
matter of the show. 



LYDIA LOUPOUKOWA 

The youthful Russian Iripi-rl.il <l;iin«-r. with 
"The Lady of the Hllppur," playing In Phila- 
delphia. 



Billie Ritchie in "Memories of Dick- 
ens" opened the new act in Mt. Ver- 
non this week. 



14 



VARIETY 



CENTURY GOING TO TREE? 

The published and denied reports 
that Sir Herbert Bcerbohm-Tree was 
coming to America to conclude nego- 
tiations for the taking over of the 
Century theatre next season, has more 
or less foundation in fact. 

Sir Herbert had conferences with 
Otto H. Kahn, one of the owners and 
directors of the Century while Mr. 
Kahn was in London and the proposi- 
tion to turn the house over to the 
titled English actor-producer after the 
Liebler & Co. term expires with this 
season, is said to have been practi- 
cally concluded, subject to the ap- 
proval of the other directors. 

"The Daughter of Heaven," pro- 
duced by the Lieblers at the Century 
last Saturday, is said to have cost 
from $75,000 to $100,000 to produce. 
The show received very bad notices in 
the New York papers, the first per- 
formance having been unfortunately 
marred by long stage waits, owing to 
the heavy and cumbersome scenery. It 
is said there was a substantial advance 
sale before the piece opened. 



NEW "CHARITY GIRL." 

"The Charity Girl" closed its New 
York engagement at the Globe last 
Saturday night and will be reorgan- 
ized, opening in Boston in about four 
weeks, with Ray Cox as the special 
feature. Meanwhile Miss Cox will play 
vaudeville for three weeks in New 
York, attending rehearsals mornings 
The Globe will remain dark until Oct 
28, when "The Lady and the Slipper," 
with Montgomery and Stone and Elsie 
Janis comes in. 

George W. Lederer was confined to 
his house the early part of the week 
with an attack of the grippe. Tuesday 
evening his wife was thrown from her 
horse while riding in Central Park and 
was picked up unconscious, but not 
seriously injured. 



ANOTHER LITTLE THEATRE. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 16. 
The name of the first piece to be 
presented at the new Little theatre 
here (financed by Mrs. J-y) is "Mrs. 
Henneberry's Christmas." The prin- 
cipal part is that of a little girl. 



CASTLES IN CABARET. 

Vernon and Irene Castle are shortly 
to appear in Martin's Cabaret. Vernon 
Castle did not open with "The Lady 
of the Slipper" at Philadelphia. 



"LOOK WHO'S HERE" EAST. 
Philadelphia, Oct. 16. 
The new Shubert show,' "Look 
Who's Here," is at the Lyric next 
week. The show was to have gone on 
to Chicago, opening at the Garrick. 
The shift out there through which 
"The Blue Bird" is sent from the Prin- 
cess to that house caused a change in 
the route of the new piece. 



"WHY?" NEW PLAY. 

Passaic, N. J., Oct. 16. 

"Why?" a new play by Zcllah Cov- 
ington and Jules Simonson, was given 
its first stage production here last week 
by the Theodore Lorch stock company. 

It is a three-act comedy drama, in 
which the leading role is played by 
Miss Covington. 



LACKAYE TWO YEARS' CONTRACT 

H. H. Frazee has signed a contract 
with Wilton Lackaye covering a period 
of two years. He rejoins the cast f 
"Fine Feathers" Nov. 11, remaining 
with it through its New York engage- 
ment and the transcontinental tour to 
follow. 

There is nothing in the contract 
about starring Lackaye. 

Frazee has secured from Edwin Mil- 
ton Royle, author, the right to produce 
"The Unwritten Law," a drama that 
was "tried out" last season by another 
management and has since been par- 
tially rewritten. It will be done before 
Jan. 1. 

He has also on tap, scheduled be- 
fore the first of the year, "An Enemy 
to Society," by George Bronson How- 
ard and Wilson Mizner. 



"PRINCESS" WITH ABARBANELL. 

"The Princess," with Lina Abarba- 
nell featured, is slated for its opening 
at Toronto Nov. 4 at the Royal Alex- 
andria. The cast, now complete, in- 
cludes Robert Warwick, Henri Leon, 
Felix Haney, Ben Hendricks, John 
Pratt, Donald Buchanan, Josephine 
Whittle, Isobel Francis, Margaret 
Crawford. 



BELASCO ACCEPTS NEW PLAY. 

David Belasco has accepted for pro- 
duction a new play, the details of which 
are surrounded with the usual Belasco 
secrecy until such time as he sees fit 
to make formal announcement of same. 

The name of the piece is not known. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
William Norris, principal comedian in 
"A Modern Eve" during its Chicago run 
has been engaged by David Belasco. 



ROSS STARTS NEW HOUSE OFF. 

Rockville, Ind., Oct. 16. 
The new Rockville theatre, seating 800, 
was opened Tuesday night. The attrac- 
tion was TTiomas W. Ross in "The Only 
Son." The house was a sell out. 



SONG TITLE PIECE. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
"Everybody's Doin' It" is the title of 
a new musical piece by the authors of 
"Alma." It will open at Ottawa, 111, 
Oct. 26, playing Illinois, Iowa and Wis- 
consin. 



CHORUS GIRLS WITHOUT AUTOS. 

Tuesday afternoon the Weber & 
Fields All Star Stock Company as- 
sembled for the first reading at the new 
Music Hall on West 44th street. The 
full company duly arrived, mostly on 
foot. Outside the theatre there were 
but two automobiles. Neither one had 
brought a chorus girl to the stage 
door. 

Even the Academy of Music stock 
company had a better record, although 
among the merrys merrys of the Aca- 
demy's show was but one "showgirl" 
with a friend owning a machine. 

Bill Sill could not be comforted when 
he saw the automobiless young women 
of the ranks. Mr. Sill attempted to 
excuse his chorus by remarking so 
many musical shows were in town 
and his girls had not been working of 
late that they must be first given a 
chance. 

Flashlights were taken of the assem- 
bled principals and choristers. 

The stage of the Music Hall is nearly 
ready to have the scenery hung. In 
the auditorium work is being rushed 
It looks as though the Weber & Fields 
show will easily open on the announced 
date, Nov. 2. 



'LANDSLIDE" TO BE SEEN. 

Los Angeles, Oct. 16. 
"The Landslide" by Austin Adams 
will be produced at Fisher's Lyceum 
Oct. 25. Hampton Delruth is making 
this production. The piece was played 
some time ago at the Auditorium with 
the Belasco stock. 



MME. SIMONE BACK. 

Mme. Simone arrived on the Kaise : 
Wilhelm this week. She is to be sent 
on tour by Liebler & Co. in a new play 
by Louis N. Parker. The title has not 
yet been selected. 

MANAGING PRINCESS. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 
Edward Doyle will manage the Prin- 
cess under the William A. Brady regime. 
Mr. Doyle has not as yet made a se- 
lection of his official family. 

The Chicago company of "Bought 
And Paid For," with Frank Mills play- 
ing the Charles Richman role, left for 
the Windy City Wednesday, where it 
opens at the Princess for a run. 




SHUBERTS RENT LYRIC. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

The Lyric will be devoted to vaude- 
ville after next week. 

The lfcase has been taken by the Al- 
cazar Amusement Co. which operates 
the Alcazar on Madison street. 

Negotiations have been in progress for 
the past week between the company and 
Sam P. Gerson, representing the Messrs. 
Shubert. The Shubcrts lease does not 
expire until Aug. 1, 1913. The house has 
not been a paying proposition. 

This leaves the Shuberts with but two 
houses in town, the Garrick in which 
they will play their dramatic shows and 
the American Music Hall, offering musi- 
cal attractions and things on that order. 

"The Blue Bird" now at the Lyric will 
remove to the Garrick next week, for 
two weeks. "The Talker," purchased by 
Tully Marshall from the Henry B. Har- 
ris Estate will probably be the next at- 
traction at the Garrick. 



ROCK ENGAGED AS PRODUCHIt. 

William Rock will stage for A. H. 
Woods, commencing next season, all 
the dancing numbers of the manager's 
musical shows. 

It is said he will receive a salary of 
$10,000 a year. 



Chicago, 
Mort Singer has signed 
Fulton for his new show, 
salary of $750. The team 
rehearsals immediately a 
present Orpheum tour. 

The new production will 
"A Widow's Honeymoon" 
"Love in a Limousine," as 
intended. 



Oct. 16. 

Rock and 

at a joint 

will start 

fter their 

be called 

instead of 

originally 



POLISH WEDDING** CLOSING. 

Boston, Oct. 16. 

"A Polish Wedding," which opened 
at the Tremont for a two weeks' stay, 
will close its season Saturday night. 
Business has been very poor and the 
management (Cohan & Harris) did not 
deem it wise to continue. 

A New York manager was here this 
week, looking over the show. 



MISS RINGLING RETIRING. 

Chicago, Oct. 26. 

Alice Ringling who has been support- 
ing Sarah Padden in "Kindling" has de- 
cided t<» retire from the stage within 
the next fortnight and settle down to 
married life in Harahoo, Wis., the home 
of the famous Ringling family. 

Olive Garnett. a member of last sea- 
son's collection of Drama Players will 
succeed Miss Ringling in the piece 



"YELLOW JACKET" REHEARSES. 

"The Yellow Jacket," which the Hen- 
ry B. Harris Estate is expected to pro- 
duce shortly after election, has startc' 
rehearsals. 

Springfield. Mass, Oct. lo. 
The premiere of "The Yellow Jacket.' 
announced for Oct. 21, has been post 
poned. Inability to round the show 
into shape in time is given as the cause. 



ALBURTUS, The 1st, JESSIE MILLAR and DOLLIE 

"A Scene at the Fairgrounds" 
At present In England (6th Mom and Stoll Tour) Orpheum Circuit Feb. 



10th. 



Jack Jarrott, "The Alabama Kid." 
opened with "The Sun Dodgers" at 
Albany last night, where the show held 
a dress rehearsal. The first public per- 
formance will be given in the same 
city tonight. 



VARIETY 



15 



$1 ,400 WEEKLY GUARANTEE 
QUESTIO NED BY MANAGERS 

Western Burlesque Wheel Road Men Object to Miner 

Houses Being Bunched. Christmas and Holy 

Weeks Excepted. Shows in Three Grades 



According to some of the road man- 
agers of the Empire Circuit (Western 
Burlesque Wheel) the new $1,400 
weekly guarantee has a string to it. 
Those managers who express dis- 
satisfaction point out the guarantee is 
suspended for the week before Christ- 
mas as well as Holy Week, and that 
five houses are left outside its oper- 
ations, namely Philadelphia (Troca- 
dero), Baltimore, Scranton, Paterson 
and Buffalo. Of this number the only 
real "live one" is Scranton, they de- 
clare. 

Another source of dissatisfaction is 
the system of bunching the Miner 
houses. Instead of declaring a $1,400 
guarantee on each of the four — Bow- 
ery, Eighth Avenue, Bronx and New- 
ark — the new system guarantees a 
total share for the traveling show of 
$5,600 for the four weeks. 

The show managers make it appear 
that this procedure is followed to pro- 
tect the Miners from making up any 
deficiency at the Eighth Avenue and 
Bowery where shows have been play- 
ing below the $2,800 gross, and ar- 
ranging things so that the Bronx and 
Newark will make up for the low re- 
ceipts in those two houses. 

One manager figured it this way: "I 
am pretty sure to play to $4,200 at the 
Bronx and Newark each. That would 
give me $4,200 for my share. Now if 
the guarantee was applied at the 
Eighth Avenue and Bowery I would 
get $2,800 at those two houses. But it 
doesn't work out that way. Suppose 
I only play to $2,000 at the Eighth 
Avenue and Bowery. Instead of get- 
ting the guarantee of $1,400 I get only 
$1,000. as under the old system and 
the deficiency is. made up out of the 
excess above $2,800 we play to at the 
two other Miner theatres." 

In the transcript of the Chicago di- 
rectors' meeting recently in which no- 
tice was given to the road managers 
of the new guarantee there appeared 
this paragraph: 

"Regularly moved and seconded 
that the management of the Empire 
theatre. Philadelphia, be assigned to 
the Governing Body until Tan. 1. 1913. 
Shows to receive fifty per cent, of the 
gross with a guarantee of $1,400. if 
the share of the gross should show less 
than $1,400, each show on the circuit 
excepting those which have already 
played there this season shall chip in its 
pro rata of such difference between 
$1,400 and fifty per cent, gross. Car- 
ried." 

The road managers interpreted this 
t<> mean that they will be called upon 
to make up for poor weeks, but i mem- 
ber of the directors who was inter- 
viewed by a \'ARiRTr representative, 
declared that this would not be so. He 
intimated that the action of a com- 
mittee, following the vote by the di- 
rectors, had changed the force of the 
•riginal resolution. 



The grading of the shows of the 
Western Wheel has been completed 
and the selection announced. Those 
which are called first-class and declared 
worthy of the $1,400 guarantee are 
"Jardin de Paris," "Watson's Burles- 
ques," "Daffydills," "Follies of the 
Day," "Dandy Girls," "Girls from Mis- 
souri," "Americans," "Gay Widows," 
"Big Review," "Tiger Lilies," "Whirl of 
Mirth," "Moulin Rouge," "Pace 
Makers," "Auto Girls," "High Life in 
Burlesque," "Merry Maidens," "Lady 
Buccaneers," "Dante's Daughters," 
"Girls from Joyland," "Monte Carlo 
Girls" and the "New Century Girls" 

In the second class are shows which 
are in good shape but require a few 
minor changes which will entitle 
them to classification with the or- 
ganizations in the first division. They 
include "Yankee Doodle Girls," "Rose 
Buds." "Miss New York, Jr.," and the 
Zallah show. 

The shows which the censorship 
committee declare to be bad and not 
deserving of the new guarantee arc 
"Queens of the Follies Bergere," "Girls 
from Reno," "Orient lis," "Cherry 
Blossoms," "Stars of Stageland" and 
"Bohemians." 

It is explained that any of the sec- 
ond or third class shows may be ad- 
vanced to the first division at any time 
they have been placed in shape. The 
show manager may apply for a new re- 
view by the Governing Body at any time. 
Tf the house manager where the show 
is playing concurs in the opinion that 
the show has really improved suffi- 
ciently to deserve a new examination, 
the Governing Board will travel to 
the stand it ; s playing at the time and 
pass upon its merits anew. 

A member of the Governing Body 
this week declared there was a move- 
ment on foot to inaugurate a new pol- 
icy at the Empire, Philadelphia, de- 
signed to increase the patronage at that 
house to such an extent that the week- 
ly gross would yield a return of more 
than $1,400 to the visiting show. It 
was practically admitted that at the 
opening of the season the weekly gross 
ran around $1,500. but it was contended 
that since then the weekly total has 
climbed steadily. 



COMING OUT AGAIN. 

"The Indiscretion of Truth," J. Hart- 
ley Manners' play, in which Robert 
Edeson appeared in New England last 

season, will again be produced by S. 
H. Wallach in New York Nov. 13. 
Henry Mortimer, leading man with 
Edna Goodrich in vaudeville, will re- 
appear in the Manners' piece. 



soi'thehn railway. 

Prrmler Carrier of the South. 

Hlph fin sb Service from .Ww York to All 
th<> rrlnrlp'O f'lllcii find Rrpnrts S>nth. Pr< f - 
<rr mini Tlouto to P.-inanvt fjui'il. <'"ntral and 
South America. N. Y. Office— 264 Fifth Ave.. 
for. 29th. — Advertisement. 



FROM BOWERY TO PEOPLE'S. 

Beginning next week the Western 

Wheel Burlesque shows will play the 

People's theatre on the Bowery instead 

of the Miner's Bowery. The People's 
is dark this week. It is under lease to 
Edelstein & Tomassheffsky for ten 
years. The lease has still seven years 
to run. The Miner estate has been in 
negotiations for some time with the 
lower East Side firm for a surrender 
of the lease. The exchange was made 
last week upon the payment of a bonus 
by the owners of the house. 

The People's is capable of holding 
more than 2,000. The future policy at 
the Bowery has not been determined. 

The opening attraction at the 
People's will be the Zallah show. West- 
ern Wheel shows in the second and 
third class will probably have a 
strengthener. 

Miner's Bowery will be closed for 
four weeks. It is understood to be 
for lease. The amount necessary co 
place the house in a proper condition 
would be considerable. 



ROBIE DIDN'T HAVE TO. 

Chicago, Oct. 1. 

Robie's "Knickerbockers" reorgan- 
ized at the Star and Garter last week. 
The censor committee of the Eastern 
Wheel looked the show over during 
its tour and placed its O. K. on it. 

Robie, however, declared the per- 
formance did not suit him personally 
and accordingly ordered revisions. 

Extensive changes were made in the 
company. Gus Elmore has been en- 
gaged to fill the place of Conn, who is 
sick. He is playing opposite Roger 
Imhoff. Jack West has been signed 
for the wild westerner, and Cecil Sum- 
mers for "straight." 



$750,000 FOR LYCEUM. 

Pittsburgh, Oct. 16. 

From rumors here, the Empire Cir- 
cuit (Western Burlesque Wheel) 
which has had no theatre In this city 
since the burning of the Academy, may 
secure the Lyceum by purchase. The 
owners are reported as unwilling to 
rent the place for burlesque but will 
sell for a price said to be $750,000. 

The Lyceum seats somewhere in the 
neighborhood of 2.000. It is now play- 
ing the Stair & Havlin dollar attrac- 
tions, t 



"THE MIRACLE" PICTURED. 

London. Oct. 16. 
The photographing of "The Miracle" 
by Joseph Menchen for moving picture 
reproduction in America and elsewhere 
by A. H. Woods has been completed. 
They will be shipped to New York 
Thursday. 




GIVE HIM CREDIT, BOYS. 

Have you seen it? Al. Reeve's new 
automobile. 

It passed up Longacre Square Tues- 
day. Even the baseball fans were 
hushed in awe. It's a limousine built 
along the general architectural lines of 
a Queen Anne cottage, with latticed 
windows and everything flossy except 
a tennis court in the front yard. The 
color scheme is unique. Yes, unique 
is the word. The body is a delicate 
Nile green and the trimmings are a 
haunting fawn color. 

Reeve's "Beauty Show" is playing 
Rochester this week, but Al jumped 
on to Broadway to give Main Street 
a flash at the new equipage. It an- 
chored in front of the Columbia the- 
atre about noon and was surrounded 
by a crowd all day Tuesday. 



GUS FAY OUT OF SHOW. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 16. 
Gus Fay, principal comedian with the 
"Big Gaiety" Co. at the Gayety this 
week, sprained his ankle and ruptured 
a blood vessel while running up stairs 
in the theatre Monday afternoon, and 
was forced to remain out of the show 
Tuesday. He is at Cooke's Hotel. 



STILL AT IT IN TORONTO. 

Toronto, Oct. 16. 
County Crown Attorney Greer, of 
Toronto, proposes to ask for an in- 
dictment in the case of alleged indecent 
performances at the Star theatre. He 
consulted with the attorney general 
and received the opinion that if any 
difficulty was found in having the po- 
lice lay information upon which a prose- 
cution could be based, the Crown at- 
torney might obtain leave from the 
courts to prefer an indictment himself 
under Sec. 208 of the Code, which pro- 
vides for the punishment of any per- 
son concerned in an immoral perform- 
ance as performer, manager or lessee 
of the theatre where the performance 
takes place. 



POP BURLESQUE WEST. 

San Francisco, Oct. 16. 
Grauman's new theatre is to be called 
the Imperial. It will open Dec. 15, 
probably with a policy of popular 
priced stock burlesque. 



STOCK BURLESQUE IN DETROIT. 

Detroit, Oct. 16. 

This is the opening week of stock 
burlesque at the Folly. The entertain- 
ment started off with excellent busi- 
ness. 

In the company are Lcanorc Butler, 
Hazel Heston, Gertrude Puprce, Bert 
Rose, Ed Lucus. George Dupree and 
two vaudeville turns. 

H. \V. Shutt is managing the Folly. 



HAWTREY IN NEW PLAY. 

William Hawtrey, who has been 
playing Canada in a revival of Arthur 
W. Piiicro's play, "Dandy Dirk." un- 
der A. G. Dclamater's management, 
will continue his American tour, but 
in a new vehicle. The Pimm piece is 
too old for box nflfice returns in the 
provinces. 

Hawtrey will not reviv "l)<;ir < )]<\ 
Billy," but will appear m a '<v» ph-v 



tim McMah()N's;cihli)Ki;n 

Jack. Kdythe and M.nl. Mi. Mi Sum. on tho 
New Jersey aoaBhon-. The l:n *,'''' ! '">' Is Jack 
Barrett. 



Blanche Leslie i- in ♦ 
Hospital. Philadelphia ; 
a slight oper;Ui.i" 



''ml 



16 



VARIETY 



By Leander Richardion. 

(Continued from page 11.) 
later date. I am inclosing you a act 
of the notices." 

The notices cert linly are line, an! 
Mr. Worm ought t<» he as pleased as 
he appears to he. One of the critics 
summarizes thr offering thus: 

Let us analyze the ingredients dis- 
passionately. It is composed of the 
following, well mixed: 

36 rhirkons, well dressed. 

15 chorus men. 

16 show la<lh's 
24 dancing girls 

7 turkey trots* 

17 good songs. 
983 laughs. 

27 specialty dunces. 

1 freak bicycle troupe. 

1 half-baked plot. 

2 comedians. 
6 scenes 

1 Gertrude Hoffmann. 
357 costumes. 

1 stage horse (In two parts). 
Ample filling for 152 silk stockings. 

2 cabaret dancers. 

360 pink toes (not dressed). 
(Recipe by Ned Way burn, theatrical 
chef). 

The Eighth Wonder. 

If you have a lurking desire to start 
something, just mention "Little Wo- 
men," where Jessie Bonstelle can hear 
you. In no time at all you will learn 
more about the book, the author, the 
family tree, the play, how it came to 
be a play, and, in fact, every conceiv- 
able matter connected with the famous 
story, than you could possibly have ab- 
sorbed from a year of conscientious 
study. 

Miss Bonstelle is so saturated with 
the subject that she fairly breathes it. 
You would think she hadn't room in 
her lithe body and active mind for 
anything else. Yet this same Jessie 
Bonstelle is managress of the new the- 
atre in Northampton, Mass., the only 
municipal playhouse in America, pre- 
sented to the city by one of its phil- 
anthropic citizens and opened last 
week with a stock company in "Old 
Heidelberg," followed this week by "A 
Woman's Way." 

In summer this really remarkab 1 e 
woman stars at the head of her own 
stock company in Buffalo and Detroit, 
and manages another and similarly 
meritorious organization elsewhere. 
She plays old pieces and produces new 
ones. She dug up "Little Women" — 
dug for eight years, until she got it. 
She is busy all the time, and then 
some. Several persons have claimed to 
have discovered the eighth wonder of 
the world. They were poor, mis- 
guided souls. Jessie Bonstelle is "it." 

Mike Leavitt on Deck. 

Mike Leavitt (nobody ever thinks of 
calling him M. B. Leavitt) will be with 
us presently, with what seems likely 
to prove one of the genuinely great 
novelties of the current season. A 
message from him, written in Paris a 
few days ago, says: 

"I will sail either Oct. 16 or 19, and 
my company of from 60 to 70 will fol- 
ic w Nov. 9. The scheme upon which 
I was summoned to Paris looks like a 
great, big winner. It should, and 
doubtless will, he a real sensation." 

The details of the enterprise which 
brings Leavitt back to the show busi- 
ness after several years' absence from 
it are not ready for disclosure, and he 
probably will wish to announce them 
himself, upon his arrival. I merely 
will say that they concern a new in- 
vention by Pathe Freres, who will re- 



ceive a heavy guarantee from the syn- 
dicate represented by Leavitt. 

The American presentations, I be- 
lieve, will he given in association with 
the Mc^rs. Shubtrt. 

Some Stage Lineage. 
Compton McKenzie. the slender, 
dark haired young Englishman who 
wrote "Carnival," the stirring dramatic 
novel upon which Grace George's new 
play is based, is a son of Edward 
Compton, an actor who was a great 
furore in America years ago when the 
late Adelaide Nielson was the rage. 
Mr. Compton was Miss Neilson's lead- 
ing man, and the matinee girls raved 
and gurgled over his physical beauty, 
while the stern visaged critics accepted 
him as an exceptionally fine young ac- 
tor. He still is living. 



STOCK 



PICTURE SCOPE ENLARGED. 

"I he scope of the Famous Players 
Film Co. has been made more com- 
prehensive for the picture sheet. Add- 
ed to the best known legitimate stars 
will be current plays irom New York 
theatres, reproduced in pictures for the 
country, possibly before the original 
pieces start out from Broadway on 
tour. 

Adolph Zukor, president of the fea- 
ture film concern, this week stated to 
a Variety- representative he did not 
anticipate any difficulty in obtaining 
the picture rights to a Broadway dra- 
matic success. "It will advertise the 
play," said Mr. Zukor. "Our pictures 
will reach a class of patrons at the 
cheaper prices the $2 charge will not 
attract." The best known books will 
be dramatized for picture reproduc- 
tion, said Mr. Zukor, whether pro- 
duced for the stage or no. 

This greatly widens the field of the 
"feature film," heretofore confined to 
submitted manuscripts, until the Fam- 
ous Players Co. came on the scene with 
its announcement of the standard plays 
of the former days with legitimate 
stars made famous through them. Of 
these some ten have been contracted 
for. A stock company is being en- 
gaged to support the Broadway lumi- 
naries. The players' gross weekly sal- 
ary will amount to $1,800, exclusive of 
the amount paid the star for posing. 
This is probably a larger amount than 
any supporting company of a Broad- 
way dramatic piece receives. 

The first of the Famous Film Co.'s 
special pictures was the Bernhardt 
film. All the state rights have been 
disposed of. Among the stars who will 
pose for the future productions will be 
comedians of high rank in the profes- 
sion. These future feature films, said 
Mr. Zukor, will shortly be announced, 
with the principal players. 

Mr. Zukor, who organized the Fam- 
ous Players Feature Film Co., and in- 
duced Daniel Frohman to become 
managing director, is a familiar figure 
to "inside" theatricals. He is inter- 
ested in several ventures with many 
managers, but has undertaken the fea- 
ture film project as his own project. 

Edwin S. Porter is the technical di- 
rector of the Famous Players Film Co. 



MARLOWE THEATRE SHUT. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

The Marlowe theatre, after a stormy 
season, closed its doors Sunday night, 
and the Marlowe Players are no more. 

The company, headed by Louise 
Randolph and Ian Maclaren, did not 
meet with the success they really de- 
served. There was much trouble at 
times over salaries. L. I. Montague, 
who was manager, resigned, and his 
place was taken by August Schwabe, 
formerly in the automobile business. 
Sanford McKnight was the president 
of the company in charge. 

The house will probably remain 
dark, but pictures may be installed. 
Formerly conducted as a stock house 
by C. B. Marvin, at one time it was 
one of the most successful neighbor- 
hood stock houses here. 



RICHARD WARNER'S OWN CO. 

Richard Warner, late director of the 
Harlem Opera House stock, is heading 
his own company in his own playlet, 
"Nightingale," at the Fourteenth Street 
theatre the last half of this week. 

As Catherine Haslam and Morris 
Frank and Co. were announced to pre- 
sent the same piece at Ncwell's. White 
Plains, N. Y., at the same time, Warner, 
who owns the playlet, expected to en- 
join them from playing his property. 



CHANGE IN SALT LAKE CO. 

A sudden change was made in the 
btock company at the Colonial, Salt 
Lake, now under the John Cort man- 
agement. 

Willard Mack's engagement was 
called off at a minute's notice. Willi 
Mack goes Marjorie Rambeau, who 
has been playing the leading feminine 
roles opposite Mack. Mack and Miss 
Rambeau were recently married in 
Pocatello, Idaho. 

The Colonial is dark this week. 
Cort has sent Catherine Countiss 
speeding out west to open a stock sea- 
son there Monday. 



KELLY LEAVES, TOO. 

Jersey City, Oct. 16. 

William J. Kelly, leading man of the 
All-Star stock at the Orpheum. leaves 
the company Oct. 26. Only three mem- 
bers of the original cast remain. They 
are Maud Gilbert, Emma Campbell and 
Writjht Kramer. 

The Orpheum management an- 
nounces a reorganization the last of 
the month. 

Pauline Lord, juvenile woman, re- 
tired ffom the company Saturday. 



George E. Leavitt will shortly be as- 
signed the managerial reins of Gordon 
& North's Eastern Wheel show, "A 
Whirl of Pleasure," 



LOUTS LEON HALL JUMPS TV. 

Louis Leon Hall, just back to Broad- 
way after closing with the road show 
of "Parsifal" in the west, jumped ovr 
to Jersey City last Friday night and. 
took Cameron demons' role in the last 
act of "Human Hearts" at the Acad- 
emy of Music. 

Clemons has developed pneumonia. 
Hall will stay with the Academy com- 
pany for four weeks, playing James 
O'Neill's role of "Monte Cristo" Oct 
21. 



KLIMT A GAZZOLO IN NEWARK. 

Klimt & Gazzolo have added Jacob's 
theatre (formerly Columbia), Newark, 
to their string and will install a com- 
pany there Oct. 21, opening in "The 
Gambler of the West." 

K. & G. have had road shows in the 
cast, but this is the first time they have 
come so close to New York with stock. 
They operate stock at the National, 
Philadelphia, and the Holliday, Balti- 
more. — — 

MUMFORD'S AMBITIOUS PLAN. 
Newark, N. J., Oct. 16. 

Leon O. Mumford, lessee of the Ar- 
cade, has announced plans for a new 
theatre seating 2,000 and playing stock 
on the site of the present Arcade. It 
is Mumford's idea to have vaudeville 
acts booked in to occupy the intervals 
between acts. 



MOVING INTO NEW HOUSE. 

When the new Cecil Spooner the- 
atre, 163d street and Boulevard, is 
opened Jan. 1, Miss Spooner will move 
her company from the Metropolis. The 
new house will seat between 1,900 and 
2,000. 



BUILDING IN OAK PARK. 

Chicago, Oct. 16. 

Gatts, Peck & Sackett are building 
a new theatre in Oak Park. They will 
call it The Playhouse, seating 1,284 and 
will be the home of the Grace Hay- 
ward Players, now at the Warrington. 

The latter theatre will be turned 
over to pictures and vaudeville soon. 



MOVED TO MANCHESTER. 

Manchester. N. H., Oct. 16. 

The King-Lynch Players, after 
twenty weeks at the Society Playhouse. 
Worcester, Mass., have opened an in- 
definite engagement here at the New 
Park. r ] 

The company is still headed by Rose 
King and Edward Lynch. 



WARBURTON STOCK. 

Yonkers, N. Y., Oct. 16. 
With Walter David as leading man, 
Aileen McDermott. late second woman 
of the Columbia Players at Washing- 
ton, will be leading woman. Others will 
be Edna Earle Andrews, Irving Lan- 
caster. Charlotte Wade Daniels. Danny 
Bagnell. Jerome Renner. The opening 
play will be "The Spendthrift." 



MILLERS AT THE GARDEN. 

The Marvellous Millers, dancers, 
have joined the Winter Garden pro- 
duction ("The Passing Show"). They 
replaced in that piece the Cehallas. who 
left to annex themselves to another 
of the Shuberts shows. "The Social 
Whirl." now on the road. 

The role in "The Passing Show." 
formerly taken by Harry Fox, has been 
given to Sydney Grant. Arthur Dea 
gon has been engaged for the Garden 
for two weeks, commencing Oct. 28. 
His st". , nay i extended. 

Maui'.-.r r ki! il H rence Walton were 
withdrawn fr .;» The Social Whirl" 
and set over v, Boston to join th* 
Gertrude Hoffmann show. 



VARIETY 



17 





LONDON 

VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE 

5 ORKKK IT., LEICESTER SQUARE. (CABLE "JIMBUCK, IXHCDOM.") 

W. BUCHANAN TAYLOR, Repreaanutw. 

(BAYARD) 

Mail for Americans and European! In Europe, If addressed "cere VARIETY, aa abort, 
will be promptly forwarded. 



London, Oct. 9. 
"It is, and it is not," may fairly 
well describe the present position of af- 
fairs at Randvoll House. A para- 
graph got into the stage papers to the 
effect that there had been a booking 
amalgamation between the London 
Theatres of Varieties (known as the 
Gibbons Circuit) and the Variety The- 
atres Controlling Co., and that in fu- 
ture Paul Murray and Archie Parnell, 
of the V. T. C. C, Charles Adams and 
C. Foster Marner of the L. T. V., 
would form a joint booking committee. 
It appears Murray was offered the 
joint general management of the two 
tours, but terms could not be arranged. 
Some structural operations have been 
made inside Randvoll House where the 
two companies reside and there will 
be a common booking room in which 
the representatives of the two compan- 
ies will carry out their work, but in 
future, as before, Mr. Murray will be 
the general manager of the Variety 
Theatre Controlling Co. with Archie 
Parnell, booking manager, and Charles 
Adams will represent the London The- 
atres of Varieties, with Albert Masters 
and Sullivan as assistants. 

There is keen competition between 
the new Alhambra management and the 
Empire at the moment. The Empire, 
as most people know, has been de- 
scribed as "the finest club in Europe." 
It is remarkably well fitted with the 
necessary things and has its own hair 
dressing establishment on the prem- 
ises, in addition to a number of other 
conveniences. Not to be outdone, the 
Alhambra is having a barber shop, too. 
The decoration of the Alhambra has 
always been reckoned by the experts 
to be correct in every detail and to 
be one of the finest modern examples 
of Moorish art. P>ut the new manage- 
ment held it to be a little gloomy and 
whilst preserving the general idea in 
character of the decoration, they have 
eliminated the dull reds and blues from 
it. Now it is a feast of bright blue, 
gold and cream. Outside it will be 
cream, the Leicester Square facade 
having huge gold pillars. The im- 
provements in the auditorium have 
been extensive. 



One of England's greatest clown 
comedians. Whimsical Walker, has 
started on a tour round the world. 
He sailed on the Oceanic Wednes- 
day last and will open at Cincinnati. 

Sir Herbert Tree has donated $500 
to Music Hall Charities. 



Willie Edelsten and Jack de Frece 
have gone into partnership in the name 
r >f I)e Frece. Edelsten & Co. 

The first half year's dividend on the 
new Chatham Empire, which Mr St >11 
fook over is 10 per cent. 

Ernest E(JeU t f n announces that h* 



will shortly produce J. J. O'Connor's 
playlet, "Marked Money," and after 
that a vaudeville sketch called "Peter- 
kin." Both his other shows, "Sign- 
posts" and "Everybody" are doing well 
all around. 

Having already played the London 
Hippodrome, the Victoria Palace and 
the Palladium, Charlotte Parry has 
been engaged as a special attraction 
at the Alhambra. She will then do for 
the first time during this visit "Th«: 
Comstock Mystery." 

The official announcement is now 
made that M. Witmark & Sons have 
handed over their popular and stand- 
ard catalogs to B. Feldman & Co. 
Charlie Warren, one of the most pop- 
ular men in London, who has been 
Witmark's manager in this city since 
the opening of their branch has 
been appointed personal representative 
abroad. 

Charles Gulliver has introduced an 
innovation at the Palladium. There 
will be matinees every day, but instead 
of music hall fare, he will give F. 
Anstey's magical farce, "The Brass 
Bottle," in its entirety, the program 
being followed up by three or four 
vaudeville turns. 

The Anatol story, "The Wedding 
Morn." adapted by Adrian Ross and set 
to the music of Lachlan Maclean, 
proved something less than a success 
at /the Tivoli. There were several 
things wrong with it. 

Arthur Bond Sayers, known to all 
London vaudevillians as "Patsy," has 
passed away. Patsy was one of the 
best conductors the London music halls 
ever had. He was located at the Pa- 
vilion for many years, having graduated 
from the Belfast. Alhambra, Palace 
Bristol, South London. Empire, Hast- 
ings and the Euston Music Hall. When 
he left the Pavilion he was appointed 
musical director of the Hippodrome 
Brighton and it was there that his 
fatal illness seized him. He died in a 
nursing establishment from rapid con- 
sumption. 



Marie Tempest is fixed for America 
for September of next year. She will 
take with her "Art and Opportunity," 
now filling the Prince of Wales thea- 
tre, and "At the Barn," which pre- 
ceded it. She has also a new play 
by Jerome K. Jerome. 

When "A Young Man's Fancy" has 

ceased to run at the Criterion it will 
be succeeded by "The Inferior Sex" 
in which Maxine Elliott. Frederick 
Kerr and O. P. Clarence appeared in 
America. 



"THE SKIRT" SAYS 

SPEAKING OF WOMAN. MOSTLY 



Mary Marble (.Colonial) has evi- 
dently made a study of Dutch clothes, 
for her costumes are always correct 
The first costume worn is a brown 
and tan stripe with a polka dot effect. 
The second is pink- taffeta, trimmed in 
lace. The caps are dainty and becom- 
ing. 

e 

Two pretty young women are the 
Farber Girls (Colonial). Over white 
accordion plaited frocks are worn white 
brocade opera cloaks, topped by lace 
caps with huge white aigrettes. The 
girls make a stunning pair. 

Myrtle Victorine and Irene Zolar 
(Fifth Ave.) for their opening number 
have chosen yellow accordion plaited 
frocks over which are worn black man- 
darin coats. The girls look well and 
have youth in their favor. 



Some husbands are difficult to keep 
track of. In fact, some are almost im- 
possible. A story repeated to me of 
a rather well-known husband of his 
wife places the better half of this 
couple in nearly a class by himself. 
The husband was recovering in a hos- 
pital from a slight illness. During the 
convalescence his actress-wife thought 
she would lighten his labors by an- 
swering the accumulated mail at home, 
all addressed to him. Tearing away 
the time from her stage duties, the 
wife commenced by opening a pretty 
looking envelope that seemed to have 
a large message inside. The sheets 
when unfolded revealed a $20 bill with 
a message saying the writer could send 
"Dearie" no more just then, but he 
might hope. The mail was very fruit- 
ful. Before going through it all, the 
wife had $150 belonging to her hus- 
band, who thereby had become indebt- 
ed to several young women. Each of 
the donors t